LumberJocks

Highly Spalted Maple Bowl & Vase

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Project by Ted posted 01-23-2016 03:14 PM 1485 views 1 time favorited 29 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Digging through my stash of spalted maple I found two pieces with exceptionally wild and crazy pattern in the grain. Not knowing how they might turn out, I gave it a shot. These are the results. The bowl measures 1 3/4” high by 4” wide, and the vase 7” tall by 2-7/8” wide, all outside dimensions. The vase was particulary challenging to hollow out evenly all the way down to the bottom. But with patience and keeping my tools sharp, I managed to get the the sides and bottom a consistent 3/16” in thickness.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.





29 comments so far

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#1 posted 01-23-2016 03:18 PM

Nice looking bowl. That is certainly beautiful spalted maple! Where is a good source for spalted wood?

Sometimes I see bowls with thicker sides and sometimes the sides seem almost paper thin. Is there a reason to choose one thickness over another? Someday I hope to dust off the lathe and learn how to do turning.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8758 posts in 1306 days


#2 posted 01-23-2016 03:22 PM

Love that spalted stuff! Great job, Ted.

-- God bless, Candy

View Ted's profile

Ted

2785 posts in 1678 days


#3 posted 01-23-2016 03:40 PM

Hi WoodNSawdust. I find most of my wood from trees cut down. One good source is the Free Stuff section of http://craigslist.org, I just search for free wood. People will often have a tree cut down and don’t know what to do with the logs, so they post an ad on craigslist telling people to come and get it. Often, it will sit on the ground for a long time, thus the spalting.

The thickness of the sides is mostly personal preference but also some like the challenge of seeing just how thin they can make it. I could have made the vase a bit thinner but I want people to actually use my stuff.

Thanks Candy, I got lucky with this wood.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

View Gary's profile

Gary

8968 posts in 2899 days


#4 posted 01-23-2016 03:48 PM

Ted, that’s some really beautiful work. That wood is outstanding. Good job…..

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#5 posted 01-23-2016 03:52 PM

Ted, thanks for the pointer for the free wood. I have looked for lumber for sale but never thought of free wood. I assume that you have a mill and kiln to dry it?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19180 posts in 2142 days


#6 posted 01-23-2016 04:16 PM

Nice looking pieces there.
Ya done did the wood good!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Ted's profile

Ted

2785 posts in 1678 days


#7 posted 01-23-2016 04:22 PM

WoodNSawdust, no mill or kiln needed. I use a chainsaw to cut the logs into manageable size pieces, then cut them further on my bandsaw. Before I had a chainsaw I used my reciprocating saw, circular saw, ax… whatever it takes. Of course the chainsaw is a heck of a lot faster.

Some of the wood I get has been sitting for a long time, so is already somewhat dry. If it’s wet then I leave some pieces to dry and turn some pieces still wet. The finished pieces may distort some after they’re turned, but that’s okay… just part of my preference to keep it natural. Sometimes they distort too much or develop cracks. That’s just the way it goes, sometimes we win and sometimes we don’t. I still enjoy the craft of turning and that’s what matters most. So just get some wood and do what you can with what you have, and have fun. :)

Thanks, Gary. The vase is my favorite turned piece so far. I’ve use up most of the wood these pieces came from. I’ll have to check if that pile of wood is still there and grab some more of it.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

View Ted's profile

Ted

2785 posts in 1678 days


#8 posted 01-23-2016 04:25 PM

Thanks Randy, but I have to say the wood did me good. As Monte says “Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.” or in this case, I just turn it. ;)

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

View John's profile

John

469 posts in 736 days


#9 posted 01-23-2016 05:09 PM

Great results Ted.

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View Cricket's profile

Cricket

1885 posts in 1059 days


#10 posted 01-23-2016 05:59 PM

Simply beautiful!

-- "Show respect even to people who don’t deserve it, not as a reflection of their character, but as a reflection of yours."

View eddie's profile

eddie

8443 posts in 2080 days


#11 posted 01-23-2016 06:14 PM

it turned out great , ,love that wood too

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View branch's profile

branch

1107 posts in 2621 days


#12 posted 01-23-2016 07:07 PM

hi the look great love the wood
branch

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22043 posts in 1805 days


#13 posted 01-23-2016 09:32 PM

Great job, beautiful wood.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

13522 posts in 1827 days


#14 posted 01-23-2016 10:24 PM

Sweet…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1732 days


#15 posted 01-24-2016 12:48 AM

That’s some amazing looking wood.

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