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Maple-Walnut swirl table

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Project by exsubsailor posted 01-17-2016 11:33 PM 1721 views 12 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My swirl accent table. I liked the way that the swirl looks, and once I figured out the best way to achieve the swirl I’ve incorporated one or two swirls in 3 different tables. This is the 3rd table so far, each one a different design. I used store bought banding on top of the legs to dress it up a little. The top is about 25” in diameter and the height is 27”. As in the title, I used maple and walnut and turned the feet on the legs on my mini lathe . I used the old trick of turning the legs on my friends regular size lathe by glueing 4 equal size walnut boards that had been jointed smooth together to make a square, The trick is to glue heavy brown paper like what the paper shopping bags were like. For safeties sake You MUST secure the 4 pieces that have been glued together with hose clamps or strong tape in case they come apart while turning them. After you turn them to the shape you want they will be much easier to separate because of the brown paper into 4 pieces. That’s enough to make 2 legs. Now do it again for the other 2 legs. Now do it for the short filler leg pieces. 2 for each leg. The 4 teardrop shapes around the outside are the original hight of the top before routing, carving, shaping, and sanding.

-- Art, Florida





19 comments so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

900 posts in 446 days


#1 posted 01-18-2016 12:11 AM

very cool super creative man I love your leg design and id love too see more on how you did the swirl,so if you can post more pics on the process im shure many will want to know your technique.ya gotta give us more this is just a beautiful table.if this is what you do please post more often thanks.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7167 posts in 2260 days


#2 posted 01-18-2016 12:25 AM

Nice one!
I love your creativity. The center feature makes me think of a prop and its swirling wash.
Lots of details to keep us coming back for another look.
Thanks

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5042 posts in 2609 days


#3 posted 01-18-2016 01:02 AM

Another beautiful table of yours! I like the contrast of the walnut and maple—and that maple looks like a vanilla ice cream swirl!

-- Dean

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3661 posts in 1727 days


#4 posted 01-18-2016 01:19 AM

I agree, another beautiful piece your of craftsmanship.

View gimmo's profile

gimmo

39 posts in 1344 days


#5 posted 01-18-2016 04:49 AM

for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

-- Stan, Southville, Ky

View Colin's profile

Colin

158 posts in 825 days


#6 posted 01-18-2016 07:07 AM

Too good for a table – it’s a work of art!
love those legs dude

-- Live Forever...............or Die Trying

View eddie's profile

eddie

8433 posts in 2075 days


#7 posted 01-18-2016 07:43 AM

awesome

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7480 posts in 1469 days


#8 posted 01-18-2016 01:36 PM

Wow. At first glance I thought it was a set of two stackable tables ! Beautiful

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View scrollingmom's profile

scrollingmom

1091 posts in 1926 days


#9 posted 01-18-2016 02:17 PM

Very nice looking table. You did a terrific job.

-- Kelly, Allen,KS

View exsubsailor's profile

exsubsailor

39 posts in 1343 days


#10 posted 01-18-2016 04:01 PM


for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- gimmo


You guessed wrong about the inlay. Maybe I shouldn’t give away the secret because it’s not that difficult, but it took me a long time to figure out the process, and now everybody will start making items with a swirl in it. However, I’ve used so many of my inspirations from other L-J woodworkers projects it wouldn’t be fair not to share. So here it is. 1- I started with a 8/4” thick maple board. 2- With a bandsaw, cut 1/2” (approximate) off each side (top & bottom). With the center of the board (4/4”) cut a square block out of the board where you want the swirl the be positioned, i.e. if the board is 6” wide, cut the block 6” long. You now have the 1” board in 3 pieces. Cut a piece of walnut to the same exact size. It won’t have to be 1” thick. 3 – Slice each block on the bandsaw into thin pieces. 4 – The slices are then glued together alternating the walnut and maple, ending with a walnut on top. You will need to have both sides of each slice smooth so no voids will appear when you carve down into the swirl. You won’t need all the slices because you need the block to be the same thickness as the other 2 pieces from the center board. You can change the thickness of the slices. The thiner the slices, the more contrasting slices in the swirl. 5 – Glue the 2 other ends of the board onto each end of the block. 6 – Glue each 1/2” piece back ( mark top & bottom and pay attention to grain direction for continuity , and they must be flat. You won’t be able to see what will be the center of the swirl, so mark where the center will be. 7 – Start carving. You will have wider bands at the top of the swirl because of the shallower slope of the carving. Hope this helps.

-- Art, Florida

View gimmo's profile

gimmo

39 posts in 1344 days


#11 posted 01-18-2016 06:30 PM

for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- gimmo

You guessed wrong about the inlay. Maybe I shouldn t give away the secret because it s not that difficult, but it took me a long time to figure out the process, and now everybody will start making items with a swirl in it. However, I ve used so many of my inspirations from other L-J woodworkers projects it wouldn t be fair not to share. So here it is. 1- I started with a 8/4” thick maple board. 2- With a bandsaw, cut 1/2” (approximate) off each side (top & bottom). With the center of the board (4/4”) cut a square block out of the board where you want the swirl the be positioned, i.e. if the board is 6” wide, cut the block 6” long. You now have the 1” board in 3 pieces. Cut a piece of walnut to the same exact size. It won t have to be 1” thick. 3 – Slice each block on the bandsaw into thin pieces. 4 – The slices are then glued together alternating the walnut and maple, ending with a walnut on top. You will need to have both sides of each slice smooth so no voids will appear when you carve down into the swirl. You won t need all the slices because you need the block to be the same thickness as the other 2 pieces from the center board. You can change the thickness of the slices. The thiner the slices, the more contrasting slices in the swirl. 5 – Glue the 2 other ends of the board onto each end of the block. 6 – Glue each 1/2” piece back ( mark top & bottom and pay attention to grain direction for continuity , and they must be flat. You won t be able to see what will be the center of the swirl, so mark where the center will be. 7 – Start carving. You will have wider bands at the top of the swirl because of the shallower slope of the carving. Hope this helps.

- exsubsailor

for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- gimmo

You guessed wrong about the inlay. Maybe I shouldn t give away the secret because it s not that difficult, but it took me a long time to figure out the process, and now everybody will start making items with a swirl in it. However, I ve used so many of my inspirations from other L-J woodworkers projects it wouldn t be fair not to share. So here it is. 1- I started with a 8/4” thick maple board. 2- With a bandsaw, cut 1/2” (approximate) off each side (top & bottom). With the center of the board (4/4”) cut a square block out of the board where you want the swirl the be positioned, i.e. if the board is 6” wide, cut the block 6” long. You now have the 1” board in 3 pieces. Cut a piece of walnut to the same exact size. It won t have to be 1” thick. 3 – Slice each block on the bandsaw into thin pieces. 4 – The slices are then glued together alternating the walnut and maple, ending with a walnut on top. You will need to have both sides of each slice smooth so no voids will appear when you carve down into the swirl. You won t need all the slices because you need the block to be the same thickness as the other 2 pieces from the center board. You can change the thickness of the slices. The thiner the slices, the more contrasting slices in the swirl. 5 – Glue the 2 other ends of the board onto each end of the block. 6 – Glue each 1/2” piece back ( mark top & bottom and pay attention to grain direction for continuity , and they must be flat. You won t be able to see what will be the center of the swirl, so mark where the center will be. 7 – Start carving. You will have wider bands at the top of the swirl because of the shallower slope of the carving. Hope this helps.

- exsubsailor

for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- gimmo

You guessed wrong about the inlay. Maybe I shouldn t give away the secret because it s not that difficult, but it took me a long time to figure out the process, and now everybody will start making items with a swirl in it. However, I ve used so many of my inspirations from other L-J woodworkers projects it wouldn t be fair not to share. So here it is. 1- I started with a 8/4” thick maple board. 2- With a bandsaw, cut 1/2” (approximate) off each side (top & bottom). With the center of the board (4/4”) cut a square block out of the board where you want the swirl the be positioned, i.e. if the board is 6” wide, cut the block 6” long. You now have the 1” board in 3 pieces. Cut a piece of walnut to the same exact size. It won t have to be 1” thick. 3 – Slice each block on the bandsaw into thin pieces. 4 – The slices are then glued together alternating the walnut and maple, ending with a walnut on top. You will need to have both sides of each slice smooth so no voids will appear when you carve down into the swirl. You won t need all the slices because you need the block to be the same thickness as the other 2 pieces from the center board. You can change the thickness of the slices. The thiner the slices, the more contrasting slices in the swirl. 5 – Glue the 2 other ends of the board onto each end of the block. 6 – Glue each 1/2” piece back ( mark top & bottom and pay attention to grain direction for continuity , and they must be flat. You won t be able to see what will be the center of the swirl, so mark where the center will be. 7 – Start carving. You will have wider bands at the top of the swirl because of the shallower slope of the carving. Hope this helps.

- exsubsailor

that was my first thought but I could not find any lines of the joints where you cut the board and glued back together. you did another excellent job hiding them.
I don’t think you will have many trying this and very few that will succeed. Myself I cannot carve anyway but would like to try something similar using a router with a rosette bit. I’m in the middle of making a flag case for a cousin that I have been trying to figure out a design to put in a 3 inch square area. This may be just what I was looking for. The rosette bit does not cut very deep so will have to have some very thin layers to get much detail. Getting them smooth with a uniform thickness will be the hard part. Maybe the thickness being off a little will not show much in the outcome. Excited now to see what I can do with this idea, gotta go to the garage and get started! THANK YOU very much for explaining your process.

for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- gimmo

You guessed wrong about the inlay. Maybe I shouldn t give away the secret because it s not that difficult, but it took me a long time to figure out the process, and now everybody will start making items with a swirl in it. However, I ve used so many of my inspirations from other L-J woodworkers projects it wouldn t be fair not to share. So here it is. 1- I started with a 8/4” thick maple board. 2- With a bandsaw, cut 1/2” (approximate) off each side (top & bottom). With the center of the board (4/4”) cut a square block out of the board where you want the swirl the be positioned, i.e. if the board is 6” wide, cut the block 6” long. You now have the 1” board in 3 pieces. Cut a piece of walnut to the same exact size. It won t have to be 1” thick. 3 – Slice each block on the bandsaw into thin pieces. 4 – The slices are then glued together alternating the walnut and maple, ending with a walnut on top. You will need to have both sides of each slice smooth so no voids will appear when you carve down into the swirl. You won t need all the slices because you need the block to be the same thickness as the other 2 pieces from the center board. You can change the thickness of the slices. The thiner the slices, the more contrasting slices in the swirl. 5 – Glue the 2 other ends of the board onto each end of the block. 6 – Glue each 1/2” piece back ( mark top & bottom and pay attention to grain direction for continuity , and they must be flat. You won t be able to see what will be the center of the swirl, so mark where the center will be. 7 – Start carving. You will have wider bands at the top of the swirl because of the shallower slope of the carving. Hope this helps.

- exsubsailor


-- Stan, Southville, Ky

View exsubsailor's profile

exsubsailor

39 posts in 1343 days


#12 posted 01-18-2016 08:37 PM


for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- gimmo

You guessed wrong about the inlay. Maybe I shouldn t give away the secret because it s not that difficult, but it took me a long time to figure out the process, and now everybody will start making items with a swirl in it. However, I ve used so many of my inspirations from other L-J woodworkers projects it wouldn t be fair not to share. So here it is. 1- I started with a 8/4” thick maple board. 2- With a bandsaw, cut 1/2” (approximate) off each side (top & bottom). With the center of the board (4/4”) cut a square block out of the board where you want the swirl the be positioned, i.e. if the board is 6” wide, cut the block 6” long. You now have the 1” board in 3 pieces. Cut a piece of walnut to the same exact size. It won t have to be 1” thick. 3 – Slice each block on the bandsaw into thin pieces. 4 – The slices are then glued together alternating the walnut and maple, ending with a walnut on top. You will need to have both sides of each slice smooth so no voids will appear when you carve down into the swirl. You won t need all the slices because you need the block to be the same thickness as the other 2 pieces from the center board. You can change the thickness of the slices. The thiner the slices, the more contrasting slices in the swirl. 5 – Glue the 2 other ends of the board onto each end of the block. 6 – Glue each 1/2” piece back ( mark top & bottom and pay attention to grain direction for continuity , and they must be flat. You won t be able to see what will be the center of the swirl, so mark where the center will be. 7 – Start carving. You will have wider bands at the top of the swirl because of the shallower slope of the carving. Hope this helps.

- exsubsailor

for the life of me I cannot figure out how you inlaid the walnut swirl into the maple swirl in that center section. EXCELLENT JOB

- exsubsailor

that was my first thought but I could not find any lines of the joints where you cut the board and glued back together. you did another excellent job hiding them.
I don t think you will have many trying this and very few that will succeed. Myself I cannot carve anyway but would like to try something similar using a router with a rosette bit. I m in the middle of making a flag case for a cousin that I have been trying to figure out a design to put in a 3 inch square area. This may be just what I was looking for. The rosette bit does not cut very deep so will have to have some very thin layers to get much detail. Getting them smooth with a uniform thickness will be the hard part. Maybe the thickness being off a little will not show much in the outcome. Excited now to see what I can do with this idea, gotta go to the garage and get started! THANK YOU very much for explaining your process.

- gimmo


The top and bottom 1/2” boards that cover the whole length of the project hide the segmented center block, and the full width and length and thickness boards on either side of the swirl board hide where the walnut/maple block is glued up in the middle of the top.

-- Art, Florida

View RussJohnson's profile

RussJohnson

53 posts in 1284 days


#13 posted 01-18-2016 10:04 PM

Damn…

We’re going to need a video of the swirling.

View SteveGaskins's profile

SteveGaskins

646 posts in 2049 days


#14 posted 01-18-2016 11:36 PM

Extremely nice table and thanks for the information for making the swirl. Love your work.

-- Steve, South Carolina, http://www.finewoodworkingofsc.com

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

643 posts in 2275 days


#15 posted 01-19-2016 01:54 AM

Sharp table

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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