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Breakdown table

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Project by russv posted 1764 days ago 4914 views 13 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My wife asked me for a table she can put together temporarily for big family gatherings (or doing her jigsaw puzzles) and that when not in use, can be stored in a closet. She told me that the tables with the folding legs are ugly, heavy, and not very sturdy. She can’t put it up and take it down by herself and sometimes breaks a nail trying. What I designed and built for her meets her criteria (including not ugly). She can assemble or disassemble this table by herself and doesn’t require tools. I told her “no guaranty you won’t break a nail”. The table can be stored in a closet or hung flat on a wall when not in use. The dimensions of the table are 72”Lx32”Wx30”H and it weighs about 35 lbs. with the plywood top. I made levelers for the base but one could take them off and put 4 threaded casters on it so it can roll around if needed. This makes it useful to be used as a temporary assembly table in a shop or garage. I made this unit out of inexpensive dimensional lumber from my local home improvement store. The only hardware required is a few wood screws, 8 carriage bolts and nuts, and 4 plastic knobs. The construction is simple. I built the base using I-beam techniques for strength and lightness, and used torsion box construction for the primary top. I have put 250 lbs. on the table when assembled and it was both sturdy and had no racking movement. This table can be used as an extra table in the house, as a picnic table outside, or in the shop. The assembly instructions and pictures are as follows:

Here is a table that is sturdy, looks nice and can be assembled and disassembled in less than 2 minutes with no tools. It only takes one person to assemble/disassemble it and can be used for an extra table indoors or outside.

To begin assembling, lay all the pieces out. Note the end piece have levelers on the bottom of these pieces. Put the first end piece on the cross piece and line it up to the bolts through the holes and put a plastic knob on each bolt and tighten lightly. Now you can install the other end. Make sure the end pieces are oriented the same direction when done. Now look at the bottom side of the top piece. Note the recessed areas of the top. These will set into the top of the base unit. Now you can put the top on the base.

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!





7 comments so far

View Sandy's profile

Sandy

137 posts in 2519 days


#1 posted 1764 days ago

Nice table, and well thought out. We could have used it this past weekend as we had over 30 dinner guests and had to make do with Target’s folding plastic thing.

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2841 days


#2 posted 1764 days ago

Why build a broke down table, oh, wait, thats break down table, very cool idea. Good job, and you made wifey happy too. Life is good.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View RetiredCoastie's profile

RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1778 days


#3 posted 1764 days ago

Very nice way to break it down. Well built.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

View dustyal's profile

dustyal

1195 posts in 2070 days


#4 posted 1764 days ago

Isn’t life easier when your customer is happy?

Very nice design and build. Very presentable as something other than a work shop table. I really like the put-it-away storage capability.

-- Al H. - small shop, small projects...

View huff's profile

huff

2779 posts in 1880 days


#5 posted 1764 days ago

Very nice table. Well done.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2172 days


#6 posted 1764 days ago

neat idea

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View choppertoo's profile

choppertoo

295 posts in 1908 days


#7 posted 1763 days ago

Nice Table Russ. I can see something like this for out at the lake when we have guests.
Nice build.

-- The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that our aim is too low and we reach it.. Michelangelo

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