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End Grain Pine Cutting Board

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Project by ChrisK posted 01-14-2016 03:03 PM 1660 views 2 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is my third one of these boards in as many months. I showed a good friend the first two I made and he was interested in one as well. He had a board that split so I offered to make him one. It is 13-1/2” X 21” by 2-3/8”.

The 13-1/2 width made it so it would not fit in my 13” Delta planer. Not a problem I thought, I have a belt sander. I should have made a router planer. The belt sander worked, but my shop looks like the dust fairies had a week long party in it.

A router plane design is now in the works.

-- Chris K





16 comments so far

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

325 posts in 992 days


#1 posted 01-14-2016 03:36 PM

I use both methods. Router mill the top and bottom, then belt sand.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#2 posted 01-14-2016 04:51 PM

Interesting, wonder how durable the pine will be

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1037 days


#3 posted 01-14-2016 05:13 PM

Looks cool, but I’d think they’d get some extra seasoning when they’re cutting stuff up.

View pottz's profile

pottz

900 posts in 445 days


#4 posted 01-14-2016 06:35 PM

Interesting, wonder how durable the pine will be

http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/
yeah soft woods arnt usually the best choice for cutting boards a lot of expansion and contraction,keep it well oiled.i love the look of the grain pattern though.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

1731 posts in 2614 days


#5 posted 01-14-2016 06:45 PM

Plus the soft wood will be a breading ground for bacteria hiding in all the knife slices that will be scored in it.
Typically not a very good idea to use such soft wood.

-- Directions are just the Manufacturer's opinion on how something should be assembled. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

346 posts in 1607 days


#6 posted 01-14-2016 06:52 PM

I was wondering about the durability too. I saw one posted here a few months back, can’t remember who, and the same concerns were brought up. The poster was adamant that they held up great, but I don’t know… Maybe designate it as a bread board.

But….. I do really like how this looks. Looks awesome.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2278 days


#7 posted 01-14-2016 06:53 PM

Among domestic woods, softwoods are more dimensionnally stable than hardwoods (that yellow pine will move less than any major American hardwood except cherry), don’t think that will be a problem. I’d worry more about durability myself, although some yellow pine species can be pretty hard.

Edit: I forgot to say, looks great…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View DCooksey's profile

DCooksey

35 posts in 556 days


#8 posted 01-14-2016 06:53 PM

Looks great. I love how the grain really pops.

This probably will work for personal use and maybe as a gift. However, if you sell items at craft fairs, be aware that per FDA guidelines, you will not be able to sell any item intended for use with food that is not considered a “hardwood”.

-- There are rarely any mistakes made in turning, but there are a lot of on-the-fly design modifications!

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#9 posted 01-15-2016 05:02 AM



...that per FDA guidelines, you will not be able to sell any item intended for use with food that is not considered a “hardwood”.

- DCooksey

You cannot use pine cutting boards in a retail food restaurant but as far as I know, there are no laws against selling pine cutting boards.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

325 posts in 992 days


#10 posted 01-15-2016 04:30 PM

From http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/ucm188064.htm

4-101.17 Wood, Use Limitation.

(A) Except as specified in ¶¶ (B), (C), and (D) of this section, wood and wood wicker may not be used as a food-contact surface.
(B) Hard maple or an equivalently hard, close-grained wood may be used for:
(1) Cutting boards; cutting blocks; bakers’ tables; and utensils such as rolling pins, doughnut dowels, salad bowls, and chopsticks; and
(2) Wooden paddles used in confectionery operations for pressure scraping kettles when manually preparing confections at a temperature of 110°C (230°F) or above.
(C) Whole, uncut, raw fruits and vegetables, and nuts in the shell may be kept in the wood shipping containers in which they were received, until the fruits, vegetables, or nuts are used.
(D) If the nature of the food requires removal of rinds, peels, husks, or shells before consumption, the whole, uncut, raw food may be kept in:
(1) Untreated wood containers; or
(2) Treated wood containers if the containers are treated with a preservative that meets the requirements specified in 21 CFR 178.3800 Preservatives for wood.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


#11 posted 01-15-2016 04:43 PM

Interesting, I don’t have the time to do research but I wonder about:

Oval Shaker Boxes that people buy and use to hold ingredients.
Turned wooden coffee scoops. If the wood was only for the handle it would be within the regulation.
Spoons, ladles, etc.


From http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/ucm188064.htm

4-101.17 Wood, Use Limitation.

(A) Except as specified in ¶¶ (B), (C), and (D) of this section, wood and wood wicker may not be used as a food-contact surface.
(B) Hard maple or an equivalently hard, close-grained wood may be used for:
(1) Cutting boards; cutting blocks; bakers tables; and utensils such as rolling pins, doughnut dowels, salad bowls, and chopsticks; and
(2) Wooden paddles used in confectionery operations for pressure scraping kettles when manually preparing confections at a temperature of 110°C (230°F) or above.
(C) Whole, uncut, raw fruits and vegetables, and nuts in the shell may be kept in the wood shipping containers in which they were received, until the fruits, vegetables, or nuts are used.
(D) If the nature of the food requires removal of rinds, peels, husks, or shells before consumption, the whole, uncut, raw food may be kept in:
(1) Untreated wood containers; or
(2) Treated wood containers if the containers are treated with a preservative that meets the requirements specified in 21 CFR 178.3800 Preservatives for wood.

- TechTeacher04


-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#12 posted 01-15-2016 06:28 PM

As I said, the rules are for retail, you can use all the wood you want at home. And you are allowed to sell them.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View XquietflyX's profile

XquietflyX

289 posts in 421 days


#13 posted 01-15-2016 06:39 PM

looks really great!!!

-- You can tell a lot about your wife by her hands, for example if they are around your throat she's prolly pissed off at you...

View DCooksey's profile

DCooksey

35 posts in 556 days


#14 posted 01-15-2016 07:16 PM

Thanks for the clarification Rick & WoodNSawdust.

-- There are rarely any mistakes made in turning, but there are a lot of on-the-fly design modifications!

View Bob Rodrigues's profile

Bob Rodrigues

47 posts in 334 days


#15 posted 01-20-2016 12:18 AM



This is my third one of these boards in as many months. I showed a good friend the first two I made and he was interested in one as well. He had a board that split so I offered to make him one. It is 13-1/2” X 21” by 2-3/8”.

The 13-1/2 width made it so it would not fit in my 13” Delta planer. Not a problem I thought, I have a belt sander. I should have made a router planer. The belt sander worked, but my shop looks like the dust fairies had a week long party in it.

A router plane design is now in the works.

- ChrisK


Isn’t pine too soft for an end grain cutting board?? I thought hardwoods are a better option. How does a pine board hold up??? Very nice board though

-- Bob, Fall River, Ma

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