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YUKON GOLD FEVER. REWARD offered to the catskinner that can find the mother lode

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Project by bushmaster posted 01-13-2016 04:12 AM 3291 views 7 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

REWARD offered to the first person who can discover how the blade and the ripper is raised and lowered, no it is not remote control. I will check morning noon and night for a winner.

I will now post the solution as its been a day, THE AIR CLEANER AND EXHAUST STACK SHAFT GOES TO THE BOTTOM OF THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT, IT HAS A SHORT PIN THROUGH IT AT BOTTOM. JUST PULL EITHER ONE UP AND TURN, A LITTLE PIN STICKS UP SO YOU CAN PUSH BACK DOWN TO SECURE AT ANY HEIGHT. NYLON FISHING LINE IS USED AS A CABLE TO RAISE AND LOWER. AIR CLEANER OPERATES THE BLADE AND THE EXHAUST STACK OPERATES THE RIPPER

Comments and question are appreciated, I have many more pictures of the parts and pieces but mainly wanted to post how to make tracks easily, it may look hard but it isn’t, the end result is worth it.

I was inspired to build one of these model by a number of these toys that has been posted recently and I wanted to develope an idea that I had to build an easy to make wood track. I hope the idea I have had will help many of you to duplicate the idea for bulldozer projects.
I had no plan and just built and designed it as I went along, the construction process turned out to be entirely different than I had originally envisioned. I am happy with what I did and would do it again. The major componets of the project are attached to the main frame by screws. It is not to scale, just chose sizes that looked good, if I had found a scale picture on the internet at the beginning of the construction it could have been abit better.
The first decision I made was to make the tracks 22 inches around and and 2 inch idler and drive sprocket and then went from there. I am going to attempt to post pictures of making the tracks.
My idea was simple, glue pads to a flexible strap which I obtained from the sewing supply store, 3/4 inch wide. On this model I lapped sewed it together, but the next morning, it dawned on me I could have joined it but to but. I experimented and it worked very good. crazy glue the ends together then sew back and forth, then glue a pad over the joint.

I then took this band and arranged it on paper and board using 2 inch disks to see how it would look

The next thing was to make the pads and and a jig to glue them on, the pads where made by shaping a long stick on table saw using a dado blade, then chopped to length, I set the saw to a 20 degree angle so the pads look like they overlap abit, the lower part on the other side has to be also slanted so it will roll around the idler, I did that free hand on a disc sander. All that has to be done now is rip a thin slot for the cleat and glue a small piece of wood in. Right, clear as mud…

The wood between the end rollers is 3/4 inch wide to aid in lining up the pads and alowing you to apply pressure when glueing, Important, a small space is necessary between the pads, use 5 minute epoxy, lat dry and move around, leave as large as apace to glue the last pads. that way you can adjust the space equally between the last pads, it is better to be alittle short and then slightly sand some off each one that to leae a space that looks bigger. I should NOTE. beforE the band is cut you must lay the all out on the band with the spacing between the pads, THEN CUT THE BAND TO LENGTH.

All done, Now if you have a lathe, lathe idlers, rollers etc, I made each side separately and glued them to a spacern then everything was built on that, the upper roller is attached to a slide the has two tension adjustment screws. Everything was built on top of that. The cab can be removed with one screw to get to the track adjustment screw. I will just post another couple pictures of this part

It takes just one bucket to hold all the parts before final assembly

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia





22 comments so far

View hunter71's profile

hunter71

2734 posts in 2654 days


#1 posted 01-13-2016 04:35 AM

I like the fact that you did this all yourself. Plans are OK, but a one of a kind build is best in my book.

-- A childs smile is payment enough.

View CO_Goose's profile

CO_Goose

120 posts in 1259 days


#2 posted 01-13-2016 04:37 AM

Looks like the Air intake is raised or lowered, which activates a pair of micro motors in the top of the hydraulics that spin screws inside the hydraulics that turn into the threaded lower section of the hydraulics.

I probably made it way too complicated…

-- Just making sawdust

View crowie's profile

crowie

1499 posts in 1419 days


#3 posted 01-13-2016 05:00 AM

Now that is one superb looking bull dozer, you certainly got me with the bucket of parts Brian….Well done sir..

PS – Where is the snow???

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2022 posts in 1636 days


#4 posted 01-13-2016 11:56 AM

Very nice Brian.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22052 posts in 1806 days


#5 posted 01-13-2016 12:16 PM

Awesome work as always. I love the attention to detail.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Dee1's profile

Dee1

193 posts in 1357 days


#6 posted 01-13-2016 02:11 PM

Very Nice great project

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1344 posts in 2481 days


#7 posted 01-13-2016 02:29 PM

Brian—very nice project. Love all the detail … especially the wood tracks.

Thanks for all the progress pictures.

You know in the back of my mind I said “Tape from the sewing store?? Why not use tyvek? You could have used a marker and color it black and no one would know the difference? ” ... lol

Now who’s getting that toy?

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Julian's profile

Julian

1040 posts in 2158 days


#8 posted 01-13-2016 03:20 PM

It came out great. Like your track idea. Added to my favorites.

-- Julian

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1096 posts in 1171 days


#9 posted 01-13-2016 03:51 PM

Very well done. I have no idea on the raising of the blade.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View KentInOttawa's profile

KentInOttawa

63 posts in 1264 days


#10 posted 01-13-2016 04:37 PM

This “toy” is an awesome build.

Looking at the pictures, I would guess that the blade and the ripper are raised and lowered “handraulically”. It looks to me like they need to be manually moved. The neat part is that it looks like the hydraulic actuators that you fabricated actually have pistons that move and that hold the blade and the ripper in place. I this is the correct answer, it is very well done, indeed.

My second guess would be that the black electrical wires simulating the hydraulic lines to the actuators actually do actuate an electromagnet within the actuators. (Did I use enough variations of actuate in that sentence)? If that is it, the engineering, the care and the attention to detail are all mind boggling.

Regardless of how the blade and the ripper are truly raised and lowered, this is an impressive “toy” that you should be very proud of building.

-- Natasha: You got plan dollink? Boris: I always got plan! They don't ever work, but I always got one. (http://bullwinkle.toonzone.net/rbplan.wav)

View htl's profile

htl

2223 posts in 627 days


#11 posted 01-13-2016 05:55 PM

Bushmaster you hinted that you were up to something and man it’s turned out really great.
Love it all but really like the way you did the roller covers got some of that smooth shaped wood working you do so well.
Also really like the way you did the tracks was thinking in those lines myself but couldn’t come up with the right material. Well done.
In the third to last picture it’s showing the power axial is this mounted and you use the screw above it to raise and lower the tracks on each side for track tension?
How about using air pressure for the valves in the hydraulic lifters.
Maybe one for in and one for out?

Really great build and love the props too.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9171 posts in 2335 days


#12 posted 01-13-2016 06:03 PM

Maschine at work! Those hydrulics looks amaizingly detailed, so small.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1377 posts in 1750 days


#13 posted 01-13-2016 06:08 PM

The solutions so far have been very interesting, but much too complicated for me, I like your imagination though. There is two bread knife blades on the line, I can mail them easy.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

1331 posts in 1445 days


#14 posted 01-13-2016 07:26 PM

Wow, what detail. The front picture caught my eye but when I saw the back with the rippers….unbelievable. As I scrolled through and saw how the belt was made, it made me want more. I have to try this someday! Thanks for posting such a beautiful model!

As for my guess, The lines are part of the detail and it’s adjusted by hand. I believe that even with all this detail, you are a “keep it simple” guy. The track is why I made this my guess.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way thats says "I meant to do that".

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1377 posts in 1750 days


#15 posted 01-13-2016 09:17 PM

yes you use your hand but not by touching the blade or ripper. nothing is hidden.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

showing 1 through 15 of 22 comments

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