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Feedback Needed for Student-Made Wooden Shelf Project

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Project by ycisdtstudent posted 01-12-2016 08:17 PM 1636 views 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hello, I am a student taking a Design Technology class.
For one of my final project, I decided to make a shelf that had a “customizable–storage” function. I would like to have some feedbacks, so that I can further improvement my current prototype. It will be very helpful if feedbacks and comments are posted (All feedbacks and criticisms are all appreciated)! All of the comments and feedbacks will be used for my final project assessment :)

Thanks!





15 comments so far

View farmerdude's profile

farmerdude

608 posts in 1506 days


#1 posted 01-12-2016 10:22 PM

Wow, that is a unique idea. I can see where this would be useful. I like the idea of being able to make adjustments, and still be able to reverse them if you change your mind. The only problem I can see, is if it were mine I would want it much larger, haha. I like it, great job!

-- Jeff in central Me.

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5314 posts in 3179 days


#2 posted 01-12-2016 10:54 PM

A unique approach! Could you use both sides to double the amount of storage? Would a place to store unneeded pins (say holes in the tops or fronts of the sides) make the used area look less cluttered and perhaps allow more room. I look at the bracelet like object in the lower middle and think that it would hang nicer if all the other pins were not there.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2632 posts in 2527 days


#3 posted 01-13-2016 12:56 AM

This is a very unique, original idea. The size does limit its application, but, no doubt, its innovative design and good use of area would be attractive to many who work with small parts, maybe in repairs or in building. This could also serve as a prototype for a much larger unit. Good work and well done!

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#4 posted 01-13-2016 01:25 AM

Unique, out of the box idea. It is versatile for right applications.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2451 posts in 1875 days


#5 posted 01-13-2016 02:30 AM

It is an interesting design, very unique. Will you be graded for practicality?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 919 days


#6 posted 01-13-2016 02:51 AM

Wood is a live material that is essentially the bones of a living creature. Respect the bone by not wasting materials. Don’t cut down a redwood to make a toothpick. Re-examine with an eye to conserving materials and see what effect that has on your design. Is there a simpler way to achieve the same effect?

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View Therockingestlobster's profile

Therockingestlobster

18 posts in 582 days


#7 posted 01-13-2016 03:54 AM

A good thought and sort of reminds me of french cleat shelf systems that I’ve seen. The knobs look a bit clunky and seems when a certain piece is not in use that it takes up a lot of space in the back, though unless you found a way to make each one telescoping I don’t know how you’d get around it. Would be really slick if it was built into a wall but not sure how well it would work as free standing. Very inspirational idea though! It takes guts to come up with something like that and to accept the criticism!

-- Write drunk, edit sober. -EH

View Tootles's profile

Tootles

780 posts in 1968 days


#8 posted 01-13-2016 05:05 AM

As a Tech teacher, I like what I am seeing. You have obviously put quite a bit of thought into it and should be able to demonstrate the full design cycle.

Some thoughts:

  1. Could the knobs on your pins have a smaller diameter? The photo with the white shelf (like that way that is made by the way) shows that it does not need the pins to have such a diameter.
  2. Could the knobs on your pins be shorter (measuring along the length of the pin)? Along with the diameter of the knobs and their spacing apart, they just seem “clunky” and dominate the overall design.
  3. Related to the comment above, could you get by with fewer pins or with them further apart? Or could you use that number of pins on a larger unit?
  4. When pushed back, perhaps the front of the pin knob should align with the front of the frame. This would give you the capacity to put on a shelf that extends outside of the frame. At the moment they appear to be quite a bit back from the front edge of the frame and so you are limited to only using the space that is within the frame.
  5. Related to the point above, you may be able to either reduce the width of the planks used to make the frame, or you may be able to keep the same width but install longer pins.
  6. I like the base. It is novel, interesting and adds weight to the unit low down, which is good for the center of gravity. Also by having it extend outwards in front, that helps to prevent the unit from toppling forwards.

Overall, I think you are doing a good job and making your teacher proud. I know I would be excited to have a student come up with such an interesting project.

Oh, since this is just a prototype, please be sure to post the final product when it is done. I’m pretty sure we would all love to see it.

-- I may have lost my marbles, but I still have my love of woodworking

View devann's profile

devann

2202 posts in 2159 days


#9 posted 01-13-2016 06:44 AM

Well done, that looks cool. You have put a bit of work in your project. I see you like to think about alternative ways to do things.

For another angle I’m thinking making some bins and shelves that would hang from the pegs rather than sit on top of them.

Like the blue bin at lower left with the bottle in it. Imagine it hanging by the upper rear portion of the bin instead of sitting on the pegs.

The small size seems to work against you, I’d consider going bigger. And then to take it a step further, make it so the entire unit could be hung on a wall.

I just posted a shelf myself a few days ago. You might like to look at photo #4. It’s showing how I keep the necessary spacing of the hooks with a piece of plywood. You might get some ideas to adapt a way of hanging the bins. Another idea could be the use of a keyhole bit used with a router.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

326 posts in 998 days


#10 posted 01-13-2016 12:59 PM

Could you modify the design by inserting pegs rather than sliding wheels and axles back and forth? Google key mod , it is a type of modular firearm accessory attachment. That type of system could give you some ideas for further design work. Slot cutting bits could be used to make that type of system in wood. Good luck, I remember my design class in the fall of 2000. Many all nighters and alot of mtn dew

View ycisdtstudent's profile

ycisdtstudent

4 posts in 332 days


#11 posted 01-13-2016 02:30 PM

Thanks for all these comments! They are all useful!

View ycisdtstudent's profile

ycisdtstudent

4 posts in 332 days


#12 posted 01-13-2016 02:33 PM


As a Tech teacher, I like what I am seeing. You have obviously put quite a bit of thought into it and should be able to demonstrate the full design cycle.

Some thoughts:

  1. Could the knobs on your pins have a smaller diameter? The photo with the white shelf (like that way that is made by the way) shows that it does not need the pins to have such a diameter.
  2. Could the knobs on your pins be shorter (measuring along the length of the pin)? Along with the diameter of the knobs and their spacing apart, they just seem “clunky” and dominate the overall design.
  3. Related to the comment above, could you get by with fewer pins or with them further apart? Or could you use that number of pins on a larger unit?
  4. When pushed back, perhaps the front of the pin knob should align with the front of the frame. This would give you the capacity to put on a shelf that extends outside of the frame. At the moment they appear to be quite a bit back from the front edge of the frame and so you are limited to only using the space that is within the frame.
  5. Related to the point above, you may be able to either reduce the width of the planks used to make the frame, or you may be able to keep the same width but install longer pins.
  6. I like the base. It is novel, interesting and adds weight to the unit low down, which is good for the center of gravity. Also by having it extend outwards in front, that helps to prevent the unit from toppling forwards.

Overall, I think you are doing a good job and making your teacher proud. I know I would be excited to have a student come up with such an interesting project.

Oh, since this is just a prototype, please be sure to post the final product when it is done. I m pretty sure we would all love to see it.

- Tootles

Thanks for the extensive feedback!

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9165 posts in 2334 days


#13 posted 01-13-2016 06:09 PM

I don’t know what to say, looks like it holds things, so it’s working. You can always make it more pretty.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

295 posts in 1815 days


#14 posted 01-14-2016 12:08 AM

As an engineer and a woodworker for 20 years, my feedback would be that this first and foremost is a really a creative approach to flexible storage. I agree with others that it needs some refining and pizzaz to make it really pop.

Of course that is also the same issue that we face continually in woodworking. How do you get the functionality and the curb appeal into the design and then into the final product. I struggle with that on every project I make. There are numerous projects that have wound up on the scrap pile because the aesthetics are all wrong. If the project has promise I keep trying things until they come out the way I want them to look. I also shamelessly “borrow” ideas from other projects that catch my eye. I have thousands of pictures of projects, close-ups, and anything that caught my eye and made me stop and say “I like that”.

Keep looking around and pondering “what if”. You are off to a great start.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View ycisdtstudent's profile

ycisdtstudent

4 posts in 332 days


#15 posted 01-14-2016 01:13 AM



As an engineer and a woodworker for 20 years, my feedback would be that this first and foremost is a really a creative approach to flexible storage. I agree with others that it needs some refining and pizzaz to make it really pop.

Of course that is also the same issue that we face continually in woodworking. How do you get the functionality and the curb appeal into the design and then into the final product. I struggle with that on every project I make. There are numerous projects that have wound up on the scrap pile because the aesthetics are all wrong. If the project has promise I keep trying things until they come out the way I want them to look. I also shamelessly “borrow” ideas from other projects that catch my eye. I have thousands of pictures of projects, close-ups, and anything that caught my eye and made me stop and say “I like that”.

Keep looking around and pondering “what if”. You are off to a great start.

- EarlS

Thank you! I will keep it in mind

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