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Concentrated Pegboard Storage for My Tools

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Project by poopiekat posted 01-11-2016 01:29 AM 1755 views 5 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been trying to come up with a design for intensified tool storage for quite a while. I first wanted to make a wall cabinet with folding doors, similar in design to the “Studley” tool chest. Problem with that design is the wasted space for swinging the doors open. Just dead air space.

I wanted to make a wall structure with panels that slide laterally, like those hardware fastener displays, but cripes the slide parts cost a fortune!

So, I realized, after looking at the counter at NAPA how a 6-foot run of catalogs was organized.

And voila! Bi-fold door hardware!

So I assembled seven shadow boxes, pegboard wrapped in hardwood.

Using upper and lower pivots from closet bi-folds, the doors swing quite well. The lower pivots are sunk into finishing washers, the tops simply pop into pre-drilled 1/4” holes.
I’ve only laid out a preliminary tool placement for photo purposes. The shadow boxes will get another sanding and a final coat of shellac.

I use both sides of the pegboard, which doubles the capacity! Not too much of a problem with hooks protruding from the other side.

The individual panels open to about 110 degrees, sufficient for easy access.

This way, I have 42 SF of pegboard storage in a 48” W by 36” high alcove.

Hope you like it!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!





13 comments so far

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3646 posts in 1725 days


#1 posted 01-11-2016 01:43 AM

That’s quite an ingenious way of storing your tools.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17955 posts in 2027 days


#2 posted 01-11-2016 11:17 AM

A good use of space.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 2240 days


#3 posted 01-11-2016 12:33 PM

Well thought out and done .. Good job, like it and may have to “borrow” this idea ;-)

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

3256 posts in 1694 days


#4 posted 01-11-2016 12:53 PM

It stood out to invite me in to look more closely, PK. Nice. I like it very much.

Now. Devils advocate. What happens when the upper board holding the doors decides it has too many holes for the weight and splits? While it seems unlikely at first glance, consider the leverage.

Oh, and be sure the lathe is off when reaching over… (OK. I’ll be quiet now! :)

On my lathe, much of the fine dust hangs in a cloud right where your tools would be. Reminds me to set up a dust collector for my lathe. As tricked out as it is, no dust collection on mine.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com There are three types of people...those who are good at math and those who aren't.

View JimInNM's profile

JimInNM

226 posts in 676 days


#5 posted 01-11-2016 01:47 PM

You must think highly of your tools. Great project

-- JimInNM........Space Case

View ptofimpact's profile

ptofimpact

347 posts in 1776 days


#6 posted 01-11-2016 02:47 PM

Wonderful work and creative

-- Pete in NC

View robert triplett's profile

robert triplett

1566 posts in 2564 days


#7 posted 01-11-2016 06:55 PM

I did some very similar and it worked great. Just took it all apart to change the set up of my work bench, but I kept the parts to use again.

-- Robert, so much inspiration here, and now time to work!!!

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#8 posted 01-12-2016 12:18 AM

Thanks, Everyone, for the great comments!
To me, a woodworker with far too many tools, my workshop has gone through many redesigns. I’ve tried everything, cupboards, drawers, plastic organizers, rollaway chests, I’m just never happy with what I’m using. It’s the small items that tend to get waylaid, so getting them out from under the pile of larger tools was a logical step.

My lathe is on wheels, and when I run it I roll it over to a 48” shop light, and I’ll run my shop-vac or dust blower to make the air clean, though yes I can easily keep these shadowboxes clean with a brush attachment on my vac.

Although there are lateral forces tugging at the upper pins, it is the lower pivots that bear the brunt of the weight. My two wooden brackets above and below are made of 4/4” hard white maple and I do not have any cause for concern about the structural integrity. One shadowbox with approx 35 pounds of stuff hanging in it survived my load test, I pulled down on it with an estimated 50 lbs of force and it didn’t move at all.

For all the times I’ve installed or repaired bifold closet doors, I’m still unsure about one thing. The typical lower doorframe pivot engages into a serrated bracket. I thought that would be ugly if used on this, so I seated them on countersunk finishing washers, because I’m just not sure whether the screw is supposed to thread itself up and down in the lower nylon bushing or not. A theoretical 90 degrees of rotation? I’ll keep an eye on this, I don’t want these screws to gradually spin them selves tighter or looser.

All the kind comments are truly appreciated!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

106 posts in 519 days


#9 posted 01-12-2016 07:11 PM

I am adoring this use of space project! I am wondering what the attachments at the lower shelf are used for? It looks like a beefy string or cord or tie of some sort. It goes through the peg board and under the bottom of the next swing board frame. And did you use two sheets of peg board in the frame to allow in-between space? I really need something like this in my tiny space for those small tools that get buried! Before the cold set in here at the high desert this winter, I had made peg board holders against the shelf sides and was making my way into incorporating the peg board into the door to save space. I am working out of a metal structure so all of my shelves are 2×4 and away from the wall. I just might be able to add this to and end.
Thanks for posting!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#10 posted 01-13-2016 01:51 AM

@ Suzanne: No, I see what you’re looking at, it was just a piece of masking tape holding the shadow boxes together for the sake of the photo. I discovered that the single pegboard sheets, with hooks inserted from either side, was the way to go. There is just minimal intrusion from one side to the other, solved by creative placement of the hooks. Here in the pics, you see small C-clamps on hooks on one side of a pegboard, and hammers on the other. The inserted ends of the hooks don’t interfere with what’s hanging on the other side:

And, that’s just a small wedge of wood holding the panel open for the sake of the photo. The panels have a natural tendency to all hang fairly uniformly outward.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View atouchofoz's profile

atouchofoz

106 posts in 519 days


#11 posted 01-13-2016 01:58 AM

Thank you! I did study it a while. I couldn’t figure it out!
I am wanting to do this for my shop!
I bet you are so glad it is finished.
It is an answer for those straggling hard to find tools!~Suzanne

-- Suzanne, A Touch Of O.Z.

View B0b's profile

B0b

101 posts in 2150 days


#12 posted 02-05-2016 03:35 PM

You just saved me quite a bit of time. I was trying to figure out how to hing a similar application, and I am about to throw away several old bi-fold doors. Thank you!

-- Time to get started

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3194 days


#13 posted 02-05-2016 05:02 PM

Thanks, Bob!
I did not use the bifold foot brackets, because I thought they’d look clunky. I did use the hardware of the door itself, upper and lower. I used finishing washers recessed into a 1/8” deep bore on the bottom pivots, and a simple 1/4” hole for the upper brackets. On regular bi-fold installations, the lower pivots lock into the serrated feet, offering some lateral fudging as you fit door to frame. On this, I simply used finishing washers for the bottom rail, to receive the door hardware.
I only gang-drilled the upper and lower ledges so that I KNOW they would hang straight and plumb. It will come down once more to get some final finishing and a revision of the peg layout. Hope you like it!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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