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Walnut cutting board with laminations

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Project by crsowa posted 01-04-2016 06:40 PM 1432 views 10 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made a few of these Walnut cutting boards in December. They are solid walnut with Sapele, koto, cherry and maple laminations that go all the way through.

-- Chris, Chef by day, wood worker by night... And most weekends...





6 comments so far

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2544 days


#1 posted 01-04-2016 06:52 PM

Very nice looking design. I am almost ready to try one of these.

-- Chris K

View WistysWoodWorkingWonders's profile

WistysWoodWorkingWonders

12664 posts in 2620 days


#2 posted 01-05-2016 06:21 AM

cool lines you’ve created, adds to the details of this board…

-- New Project = New Tool... it's just the way it is, don't fight it... :)

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majuvla

9139 posts in 2330 days


#3 posted 01-05-2016 11:08 AM

Colours you choose are realy incredible good looking. More dark colour with some light coloured stripes look awesome.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View DavidI's profile

DavidI

5 posts in 817 days


#4 posted 01-13-2016 02:15 AM

I love this board! You did a great job.

I want to do something similar, but want to go end grain. My concern with end grain is creating the inlays. I suspect because of the thinness, I’ll have trouble with stock that just has a small glue joint holding it together at the time I try to clamp it into the curve. Any ideas on how to accomplish without issue.

View crsowa's profile

crsowa

36 posts in 1454 days


#5 posted 01-13-2016 04:31 PM



I love this board! You did a great job.

I want to do something similar, but want to go end grain. My concern with end grain is creating the inlays. I suspect because of the thinness, I ll have trouble with stock that just has a small glue joint holding it together at the time I try to clamp it into the curve. Any ideas on how to accomplish without issue.

- DavidI

David,
I see what your saying, but i don’t think the glue joints will be the problem, as much at the wood fibers. Glue nowadays is usually stronger the the wood fibers themselves. I have not tried this on endgrain, but I have been it done where, instead of laminations running all the way through the board, the pattern is just a 1/4’ deep inlay. MTM wood does it here…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x--skm2qf5I

hope this helps
Chris

-- Chris, Chef by day, wood worker by night... And most weekends...

View DavidI's profile

DavidI

5 posts in 817 days


#6 posted 02-15-2016 03:49 AM


I love this board! You did a great job.

I want to do something similar, but want to go end grain. My concern with end grain is creating the inlays. I suspect because of the thinness, I ll have trouble with stock that just has a small glue joint holding it together at the time I try to clamp it into the curve. Any ideas on how to accomplish without issue.

- DavidI

David,
I see what your saying, but i don t think the glue joints will be the problem, as much at the wood fibers. Glue nowadays is usually stronger the the wood fibers themselves. I have not tried this on endgrain, but I have been it done where, instead of laminations running all the way through the board, the pattern is just a 1/4 deep inlay. MTM wood does it here…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x--skm2qf5I

hope this helps
Chris

- crsowa

Thanks for the ideas. You know, I’m almost wondering if it would be ok to do the board end grain, but not the inlay. If you think about it, the two would still be meeting at edge grain. So I think separation possibilities wouldn’t be an issue. Only question is how knives would react, but I think with such a thin line, it’d be alright. What do you think?

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