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"Cookie Monster" Stool/End Table

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Project by ChicagoHiker posted 01-04-2016 02:16 PM 811 views 4 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made from two “cookies” (cross-sections of a wood log) of white oak (top) and hickory (shelf) and 3/4-inch copper pipe, this end table/stool is my most rustic piece to date. It measures approximately 18” high x 16” wide x 14” deep.

I used a clear polyester casting resin to fill the wedge-shaped voids on the two cookies. I felt I got mixed results with this process. The resin was messy and difficult to keep in the void while drying.

-- Paul Segedin, Chicago, IL http://urbanprairiedesign.com/





7 comments so far

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2543 days


#1 posted 01-04-2016 06:02 PM

Interesting look.

I have used epoxy to fill voids in the past. I use masking tape to make dam and then sand or carve the epoxy to the final shape.

-- Chris K

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1414 days


#2 posted 01-04-2016 08:07 PM

Very creative – I like the wood and copper combination. Copper should mellow nicely over time, or you can keep it highly polished. How are the copper pipes attached to the wood? Just glued into drilled holes or is there more to it?
Thanks for posting and Happy New Year!

-- Leafherder

View ChicagoHiker's profile

ChicagoHiker

42 posts in 1267 days


#3 posted 01-04-2016 09:26 PM

Thanks for your comment. I used PC-7 epoxy on this piece. It probably wasn’t necessary. I get a very tight fit just hitting the pipe into the drilled holes.


Very creative – I like the wood and copper combination. Copper should mellow nicely over time, or you can keep it highly polished. How are the copper pipes attached to the wood? Just glued into drilled holes or is there more to it?
Thanks for posting and Happy New Year!

- leafherder


-- Paul Segedin, Chicago, IL http://urbanprairiedesign.com/

View ChicagoHiker's profile

ChicagoHiker

42 posts in 1267 days


#4 posted 01-04-2016 09:29 PM

Do you use a clear epoxy? Even though the void is narrow on this I like that light can shine through.

I used cardboard and tape and wood and clamps to make a dam, but still had leakage. I made a mistake in trying to fill the entire gap at once. Should have done a few pours, allowing each to dry first. Since I was working in a cold garage I rushed it!


Interesting look.

I have used epoxy to fill voids in the past. I use masking tape to make dam and then sand or carve the epoxy to the final shape.

- ChrisK


-- Paul Segedin, Chicago, IL http://urbanprairiedesign.com/

View TinWhiskers's profile

TinWhiskers

179 posts in 414 days


#5 posted 01-05-2016 12:56 AM

How about cutting a wedge of similar or disimilar wood big enough to cover all the splits. Outline it over the splits and cut out. Insert. Bowties?

I do like the ideas you came up with.

View ChicagoHiker's profile

ChicagoHiker

42 posts in 1267 days


#6 posted 01-06-2016 02:47 PM

I’ve seen bowties used recently. My handtool skills are lacking, but that might be a good way to learn!

Thanks for your comments.


How about cutting a wedge of similar or disimilar wood big enough to cover all the splits. Outline it over the splits and cut out. Insert. Bowties?

I do like the ideas you came up with.

- TinWhiskers


-- Paul Segedin, Chicago, IL http://urbanprairiedesign.com/

View learnin2do's profile

learnin2do

889 posts in 2313 days


#7 posted 01-12-2016 07:25 PM

i like filling them with tiny twigs (upright in the crack to show end circles) and epoxy. it has a nice effect; folks like it.
that is not an easy project you accomplished there!

-- ~christine @ used2btrees

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