LumberJocks

A Nutmeg Table and Chairs

  • Advertise with us
Project by riverguy posted 01-02-2016 05:25 AM 961 views 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My supply of this wonderful wood is about exhausted. (See my recent other nutmeg table post for details on the wood and finishing process.) This table is about 64” x 34” and the plank top is 2” thick. I’ve been having such a positive experience with this “retro-industrial” genre of furniture that I’ve built quite a bit of it now and enjoy the process a lot. It also gave me an excuse to buy a wire-feed welder! As with the other table, the planks are edge-machined and then glued-and-splined with continuous 1/2” x 2” splines. It will never come apart! The legs run through mortise-drilled holes in the cross-pieces.

Folks have been asking for chairs, so I thought a quick way to satisfy the need without tooling up to build chairs was to buy these repro-vintage steel chairs, apply my own antiquing finish and then fit them with seats made of the same nutmeg as the top. I resawed the falls from the top planks and glued-and-splined together two pieces for each seat.

Please excuse the less-than-awesome photo quality. I got sidetracked on this one and just got some shots with my phone.

-- Skip, Forestville, CA, http://www.retro-industrial-chic.com





7 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

295 posts in 1816 days


#1 posted 01-02-2016 01:59 PM

I’ve never seen nutmeg before and those are some big pieces. Is that the grain or saw marks? It certainly defines retro industrial without being to heavy.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1344 posts in 2481 days


#2 posted 01-02-2016 02:22 PM

Vey nice pieces of furniture. Those will last several lifetimes. You didn’t say the source of the chair frames.

Thanks for sharing.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Josh's profile

Josh

1201 posts in 2037 days


#3 posted 01-02-2016 05:00 PM

Nutmeg? That’s so cool!

-- Tree, wood, and box lover from Pennsylvania

View Vincent Nocito's profile

Vincent Nocito

485 posts in 2832 days


#4 posted 01-02-2016 06:06 PM

Really love the mill marks. Give the table a lot of character. smart solution to the chair build. Great project.

View riverguy's profile

riverguy

110 posts in 1532 days


#5 posted 01-02-2016 06:07 PM



Vey nice pieces of furniture. Those will last several lifetimes. You didn t say the source of the chair frames.

Thanks for sharing.

- tyvekboy


Thank you! The chairs came from Overstock.com, although they are available from other sources, too. Overstock.com had the best price and free shipping. Their description: Antique Metal Dining Chair, Item#: 17812293. Price is $70 each. I ordered four and had them in less than a week. The finish is called “antique,” but it’s shiny and doesn’t look very much like an antique. I sprayed various shades of flat light brown to simulate rust, and some flat black to simulate the original failing finish. Then a coat of flat clear over the whole chair. The seats are two pieces of the same nutmeg as the table, resawn from the 2” planks and then splined together. That assembly is then glued and screwed to a 1/2” plywood base that’s about 1-1/2” smaller than the seat, and that is attached to the chair with screws through the original holes in the chair top. Gives the seat a bit of a floating look and raises it to standard 19” chair height.

-- Skip, Forestville, CA, http://www.retro-industrial-chic.com

View riverguy's profile

riverguy

110 posts in 1532 days


#6 posted 01-02-2016 06:16 PM



I ve never seen nutmeg before and those are some big pieces. Is that the grain or saw marks? It certainly defines retro industrial without being to heavy.

- EarlS


Thank you for the kind words! Nutmeg actually has a kind of boring, straight, tight grain. The natural color lf the freshly cut wood is an unappealing yellow, as is the sawdust. The color I ended up with is a result of the marine spar varnish. All of the character in this wood comes from the fact that it had been stored for 50 years in an old barn and in all that time had turned dark gray. I worked the surfaces with 50-grit on a body grinder – very lightly – just until I revealed some of the color of the original wood, but left most of the saw marks still with the gray imbedded. After that, I used a random orbit sander with 180 and then 220 under the varnish. The saw marks are from the huge circular mill saw that cut these planks from a very large tree over 50 years ago. Unfortunately, I’m about out of my supply, and at this time it seems maybe I should have resawn all of it! But the full 2” planks make for some pretty cool table tops!

-- Skip, Forestville, CA, http://www.retro-industrial-chic.com

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1344 posts in 2481 days


#7 posted 01-03-2016 01:39 AM

Thanks for the source of the chairs and detailed description.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com