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And yet even more zero clearance inserts.

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Project by Routerisstillmyname posted 09-04-2009 03:27 AM 4252 views 16 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Not much to say. It was kind of challenging making these since the Ridgid 3660 table saw, the 10” blade doesn’t drop far enough. But there’s always a way. (pic #2).I made few for each blade. I use mostly UMHW.
If you own a table saw or any kind of saw, zero clearance is a must. I even made few for my skill and jig saws before I got a table saw.

-- Router è ancora il mio nome.





17 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112944 posts in 2332 days


#1 posted 09-04-2009 03:35 AM

good job

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 2059 days


#2 posted 09-04-2009 04:22 AM

I picked up a $10.00 phenolic cutting board from Wal Mart the other day, it’s large enough to make two or three zero clearance inserts for my Rigid table saw. I just need to find the time to get them done.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2137 days


#3 posted 09-04-2009 06:48 AM

You have inspired me to do this myself. I knew you used a router to make the plates, but now that I see you just pattern the original piece with a flush trim bit, I’m slapping my head at the obvious, simple solution. I have a RIDGID saw, too. This just got added to my list of projects.

Two questions:

1) how do you level it with the top? Do you keep removing it and playing with the screws underneath it until it’s flush?

2) what’s holding it down to the table, or is it just in there by gravity?

Thanks!

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2843 days


#4 posted 09-04-2009 12:48 PM

I don’t know how anyone else does it but for me the simple thing is to drill 4 holes and use set screws. Them you adjust if from the top.

Lee

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View RexMcKinnon's profile

RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 1950 days


#5 posted 09-04-2009 04:34 PM

I like the UMHW inserts. They look thicker than the original. If they are do you thin the whole thing or just rabid the edges.

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

View NedB's profile

NedB

659 posts in 2321 days


#6 posted 09-04-2009 05:10 PM

I’ve got a Ridgid 3650 and just picked up a splitter kit for it, so I’ll be firing up a set of new ZCIs. If you have a dado stack, using one of the 8” blades will usually get you in the ball game when making the initial cut. I’ also seen tips where you can rout out a section on the back of the insert to about half the depth to help clear the 10” blade. Same idea can help get you to depth without using set screws simply make the blank thicker, then rout out the areas where the supports are.

-- Ned - 2B1ASK1 http://nedswoodshop.blogspot.com

View Routerisstillmyname's profile

Routerisstillmyname

713 posts in 2264 days


#7 posted 09-05-2009 01:37 AM

THX for the comments.

how do you level it with the top? Do you keep removing it and playing with the screws underneath it until it’s flush?

I like the UMHW inserts. They look thicker than the original. If they are do you thin the whole thing or just rabid the edges.

No screws. No rabid or thinning. I use UMHW and ply that are same thickness as depth of throat not thickness of the plate.for 3660 it was slightly over 7/16. use a dial caliper to measure the depth.

what’s holding it down to the table, or is it just in there by gravity?

It’s there by slight force. Before you use a flush trim with the plate, carefully add two rounds of scotch tape to the outside of plate all around. This way when you use the flush bit, it will cut slightly over and the inserts will fit in nice and tight.

-- Router è ancora il mio nome.

View Gary Fixler's profile

Gary Fixler

1000 posts in 2137 days


#8 posted 09-05-2009 02:22 PM

Thanks for the info, Router!

-- Gary, Los Angeles, video game animator

View Routerisstillmyname's profile

Routerisstillmyname

713 posts in 2264 days


#9 posted 09-05-2009 07:54 PM

Any time. the UMHW is exact thickness but the ply is slightly under which makes no difference. as long as it’s not over.

-- Router è ancora il mio nome.

View kcrandy's profile

kcrandy

285 posts in 2187 days


#10 posted 10-20-2009 03:19 AM

I wish there was a forum called “lumberjocks for dummies” I’m a novice and would love to read basic instructions and explanations about things. Hate to ask stupid questions and waste people’s time, but would love to have a forum where the experts would be willing to go and answer newbie questions.

-- Caulk and paint are a poor carpenter's best friends

View NedB's profile

NedB

659 posts in 2321 days


#11 posted 10-21-2009 02:06 PM

Randy, I think you’ll find you’re On one of the more helpful forums, ask away!

-- Ned - 2B1ASK1 http://nedswoodshop.blogspot.com

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11688 posts in 2443 days


#12 posted 06-28-2010 01:50 AM

Where did you find the 7/16” UHMW plastic ?
You said it doesn’t matter that the plywood you use is not as thick as the insert is deep….doesn’t that defeat the purpose of having a ZCI in the first place ? Are you saying that you don’t get any tear out on the bottom of your cuts ? What thickness ply are you using ?
How do you get the inserts out without damaging them if they are a force fit ? I didn’t notice any fingerholes in the ones pictured today.
In your final picture , why is the bearing off of the router bit ?
Thank you : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Routerisstillmyname's profile

Routerisstillmyname

713 posts in 2264 days


#13 posted 06-28-2010 04:19 AM

Bearing is out because if you look close, you will see a small piece of double ended tape on the bearing shaft. It’s an extremely dangerous trick that use to eliminate the protruding screw.

Finger holes not necessary on contractors TS since the back is open and motor hangs out the back. Reach through the back and pop it out.

Wood approximately 0.460 inches, No tear outs if slightly under. You can always use adjustment screws if you like.

Plastic was a local junk bin purchase in Houston about 5 years ago from somewhere I don’t remember the name.

-- Router è ancora il mio nome.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11688 posts in 2443 days


#14 posted 06-28-2010 12:08 PM

Yup , it could get real messy if that bearing came off…..wow !
I was wondering what type of saw you had …..mine is a cabinet model so I’d need the holes : ) Thanks for the feedback and have a great day.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Philip "Pip" Storm's profile

Philip "Pip" Storm

130 posts in 1091 days


#15 posted 12-01-2012 01:02 PM

I recently saw a video on youtube that solved the “blade not going low enough issue”. They used an electric hand saw blade (skill saw or what ever you want to call them) ,which has a smaller diameter, to cut the slot in the ZCI. Then you reinstall your 10” to finish it off. These blades tend to have a smaller kerf so you may have to double them up. I’ve seen these blades as low as $4 dollars.

-- Well, I'll be screwed, glued, and tattooed!

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