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Kerf Master my version

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Project by alholstein posted 09-01-2009 05:53 AM 5981 views 21 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My version of the Kerf Master, I made out of scraps of oak and a little bit of redwood. Rather that using a sliding dado I just built a box around the movable part. There is a slit in the redwood top to allow for compression of the wingnut to hold it in it firm. There is a 1/4” slot in the movable part that accepts the 1/4” carriage bolt and wingnut. I just used a deck screw to make the offset adjustment. I personalized it with my initials, using a aluminum foil template, a magnifying glass and the sun. Fun to make, but haven’t really used it yet other than testing it out. Total cost less than 50 cents.

Al

-- Al Holstein "I wood do it"





15 comments so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3146 days


#1 posted 09-01-2009 05:55 AM

Alright another copy. I’m going to find mine.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11684 posts in 2434 days


#2 posted 09-01-2009 06:02 AM

This one is even simpler to build : ) Great job and thanks for the Initial trick : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112828 posts in 2323 days


#3 posted 09-01-2009 07:20 AM

looks good

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BigFoot Products Canada's profile

BigFoot Products Canada

631 posts in 2139 days


#4 posted 09-01-2009 12:56 PM

Cool. The most versions of any jig that I’ve ever seen. I’m still not clear on how you guys are setting the offset with these?? or are you just setting it to one blade only?

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4930 posts in 2628 days


#5 posted 09-01-2009 02:11 PM

Sweet. I like it. The sunburn looks great.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View navyman's profile

navyman

151 posts in 2151 days


#6 posted 09-01-2009 02:37 PM

I know this is a dum question. But what do yoou use it for? But it looks realy nice..

-- Michael . USN ( Ret ) Batesville,AR

View alholstein's profile

alholstein

165 posts in 2787 days


#7 posted 09-01-2009 07:44 PM

David,
I set the offset by trial and error, by screwing in the deck screw more or less depending on what is needed. That isn’t a problem as I will likely be using only one blade. With this I can easily adjust how tight or loose I want the joint to be.
Al

-- Al Holstein "I wood do it"

View alholstein's profile

alholstein

165 posts in 2787 days


#8 posted 09-01-2009 07:50 PM

Michael,
The sliding piece functions like a caliper for measuring the width of the piece you are wanting to inset into a dado or rabbet. The end that sticks out minus the screw offset is the is the width that you need to move the wood from a stop to achieve this amount of kerf.
The following link has a movie showing how their version can be used.

http://www.bridgecitytools.com/Products/KM-1+KerfMaker+Pre-Order
Al

-- Al Holstein "I wood do it"

View navyman's profile

navyman

151 posts in 2151 days


#9 posted 09-01-2009 08:48 PM

Man i’m going to have to make one. i’ve been useing scrap to try and set things uo /// thanks a lot

-- Michael . USN ( Ret ) Batesville,AR

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1194 posts in 1939 days


#10 posted 09-01-2009 09:37 PM

Al,

You said to David that you set the offset by trial and error? Watch the Bridge City’s video closely, precisely the last minute. They show how to set the offset by ripping a scrap piece of wood partially, then crosscut half of it, slide the cutoff against the remaining part and adjust the set screw until the offset is equal to the gap. No need here for trial and error, only to tighen or loosen a joint, as you mentioned. The same technique applies setting the offset with a dado blade set.

And thanks for sharing your free pyrography technique. This is clever. However, it must take a while to cut the letters out of the aluminum foil.

Best,

Serge

http://www.atelierdubricoleur.spaces.live.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View alholstein's profile

alholstein

165 posts in 2787 days


#11 posted 09-01-2009 10:20 PM

Serge,

The template didn’t take too long. I glued almuinum foil on the the wood with a glue stick and then glued my paper pattern, which was a word printout of the initials, on the aluminum foil. Then cut through both layers with an exacto knife and used twezzers to pull up the lettering that I cut around.

Having a fixed holder for the magnifying glass allow me to just hold the wood with both hands and move it around to complete the burning. It goes pretty quick. Then removing the foil and doing a little sanding gives a finished look to. A homemade laser print, without the cost, but missing some of the fine details.

You are right about using the technique to determine the offset, I was only thinking about using it for a single blade rather than a dado blade set.

Al

-- Al Holstein "I wood do it"

View ChuckM's profile

ChuckM

505 posts in 2412 days


#12 posted 09-02-2009 02:19 AM

Nice way of doing it. As I said, “Keep it comin’.” Together we’ll be making the longest chain project here!

Btw, Serge, Congrats to you for another top tip in the Wood magazine. You sure sets the bar high for us tipsters. At the current rate, for every 5 tips you’d produce, I might only, with much effort, squeeze in one.

-- The time I enjoy wasting is not time wasted

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1194 posts in 1939 days


#13 posted 09-02-2009 02:20 AM

Thanks Al for the details of your technique. I copied/pasted it in Word so I won’t forget it. This is very clever.

I believe your technique would work as well with contours of pictures and/or drawings. Something new to try. I’m actually making twin hutches for my kitchen and I wanted to camouflage the screw heads which hold the shelves from the sides with hand painting or pyrography. Using your pattern should be a good way to go. To be followed! Thanks again.

Best,

Serge

http://www.atelierdubricoleur.spaces.live.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View Innovator's profile

Innovator

3584 posts in 2159 days


#14 posted 09-02-2009 03:56 AM

Looking good.

-- Whether You Think You Can or You Think You Can't, YOU ARE RIGHT!!!

View kimball's profile

kimball

323 posts in 2043 days


#15 posted 07-23-2010 04:41 PM

Al, nice looking interpretaion. These little guys are gr8. We really need to thank who ever made the first adaptation.
Kimball

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