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CEDAR BOWL

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Project by twirlygirl posted 12-21-2015 06:49 PM 487 views 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a late wedding/Christmas gift for a coworker. She had used 2 pcs of Cedar in her wedding as display props. She gave them to me and I wanted to make her something special.

The 4th picture is what happened to the first piece I turned. I love the rustic and raw look. So the wood had some cracks and bug holes I wanted to keep. Well, just in case you did not know, when you finish turning a piece of wood that has cracks in it and turn your lathe up to a high rate of speed to finish it, it can EXPLODE! I have a few nice bruises to prove it. Luckily, that was the worst of it for me. However it did take a chunk out of the ceiling and the wall.

I do feel like I have been “officially” initiated into the turning club now – LOL

So out came the 2nd piece. Learning from my first mistake, I finished it off the lathe with some toungue oil and wax.

-- I turn wood into 'things' ..... what is your superpower?





12 comments so far

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

2005 posts in 1732 days


#1 posted 12-21-2015 07:27 PM

Nice bowl.

I do love cedar.

I also learned the same way—; I just caught a chisel too deep though!

I did manage to find the pieces and with rubber bands (CLAMPS!!!) saved it. If I look hard I can see where I glued it.

My lathe is very small (one of the H-F cheapies) so I did not have as dangerous of shrapnel flying around the shop.

-- just rjR

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2571 days


#2 posted 12-21-2015 11:12 PM

That came out beautiful, Michelle. The one one is wood shrapnel!! I had a hollow sphere do that when the pith released on both ends!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View LesB's profile

LesB

1237 posts in 2909 days


#3 posted 12-22-2015 12:19 AM

You did a nice job on the second one.
Turning an end grain center cut like that will always be a hazard and 8 times out of 10 they will eventually develop cracks (even after they are finished); especially if they are not completely dry. I would expect over time that this one will crack. I see two or three places in the wood grain that are just waiting for an excuse to do it…...

One effective way to hold pieces together when you notice cracks forming during the turning process is to fill them with medium or thick super glue (as early as possible). Put plenty in the crack and let it seep in, adding more as it sinks down. Let the piece set for several hours so the glue hardens. As you continue the turning watch for more cracks or that you have cut through the glue you put in and need to add more. Often I will first fill larger cracks with the fine shavings from the piece then add the glue. The end result is a crack repair that matches the rest of the wood.
If you catch cracks as they just start you can stop them with the glue and then cut through and past them into clean wood. With very fine cracks I put the thin glue on and then a little medium. The thicker glue seems to seep in better with the thin glue “primer”.

-- Les B, Oregon

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#4 posted 12-22-2015 12:34 AM

Nice bowl. Looks good … Dont ya just hate when they decide to self-destruct like that? :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View peteg's profile

peteg

3857 posts in 2289 days


#5 posted 12-22-2015 11:24 PM

Good on you for sticking to the task, you’re lucky by the sounds of it can be dammed scary when a piece just lets go on you,
well done
cheers Pete

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View John's profile

John

468 posts in 736 days


#6 posted 12-23-2015 12:06 AM

I find these end grain bowls really interesting to look at. It is surprising that they don’t split while drying. How were you holding the first bowl when it let fly?

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View Dust_Maker's profile

Dust_Maker

41 posts in 1787 days


#7 posted 01-13-2016 06:19 PM

The polished end grain is beautiful in this bowl. Good work. By the way, I think that piece of “cedar” came from an oak tree.

Stay creative and safe.

-- 2Cor. 4:6

View twirlygirl's profile

twirlygirl

61 posts in 947 days


#8 posted 01-13-2016 07:45 PM

Thanks Dust_Maker.
I sincerely appreciate you letting me know that this is not cedar. I was told it was Cedar. After I posted this, I started looking at it better and wondered. I am not sure if it is oak or something else. But it was a great learning experience all around.
Thank you for the kind words.


The polished end grain is beautiful in this bowl. Good work. By the way, I think that piece of “cedar” came from an oak tree.

-- I turn wood into 'things' ..... what is your superpower?

View twirlygirl's profile

twirlygirl

61 posts in 947 days


#9 posted 01-13-2016 07:51 PM

John,
I had it still mounted on the lathe. Turned the speed up and moved the wax stick about an inch away from it and …BAM! That was it. Didnt even have to touch it.


I find these end grain bowls really interesting to look at. It is surprising that they don t split while drying. How were you holding the first bowl when it let fly?

-- I turn wood into 'things' ..... what is your superpower?

View twirlygirl's profile

twirlygirl

61 posts in 947 days


#10 posted 01-13-2016 07:56 PM

Les,
It is hard to see, but some of the cracks I had filled with the glue & wood shaving concoction. I love that trick. I will have to try the other glue ‘trick’ next time. Thanks for the input!!


You did a nice job on the second one.
Turning an end grain center cut like that will always be a hazard and 8 times out of 10 they will eventually develop cracks (even after they are finished); especially if they are not completely dry. I would expect over time that this one will crack. I see two or three places in the wood grain that are just waiting for an excuse to do it…...

One effective way to hold pieces together when you notice cracks forming during the turning process is to fill them with medium or thick super glue (as early as possible). Put plenty in the crack and let it seep in, adding more as it sinks down. Let the piece set for several hours so the glue hardens. As you continue the turning watch for more cracks or that you have cut through the glue you put in and need to add more. Often I will first fill larger cracks with the fine shavings from the piece then add the glue. The end result is a crack repair that matches the rest of the wood.
If you catch cracks as they just start you can stop them with the glue and then cut through and past them into clean wood. With very fine cracks I put the thin glue on and then a little medium. The thicker glue seems to seep in better with the thin glue “primer”.

- LesB


-- I turn wood into 'things' ..... what is your superpower?

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23189 posts in 2333 days


#11 posted 01-13-2016 09:59 PM

This is a beautiful bowl.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1369 posts in 1749 days


#12 posted 12-08-2016 10:48 PM

This turning of end grain is outstanding. Yes high speed on thin endgrain cool be a problem. Gland you lived to tell about it.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

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