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New Shop Cabinets

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Project by Tony1212 posted 11-30-2015 08:28 PM 1888 views 4 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I built myself some new cabinets for the shop.

Rather than futz around with the traditional tenon in the frame and panel doors, I decided to try simple half laps. I also figured that would be stronger to hold all the tools on the doors. It doesn’t look the best, as you can see in the last picture, but the edges are hidden when the doors are closed.

The carcasses were all made of 3/4” ply for the top, bottom and sides, and 1/2” for the back. I used pocket screws on all of it because I don’t have enough clamps to clamp all of that up at the same time. For the cabinets, I used ACX ply that I bought new. The drawer carcass was made from some birch cabinet ply that I had leftover from some other cabinets I made for the house.

The cabinets are about 22” wide x 22” deep x 43” high. The drawers are pretty much the same except only about 10” wide.

I use peanut butter jars for my screws and nails. The small ones hold about a 1lb box and the big ones hold a 5 lb box. Then I just rip the label off and put it in the jar so I can see what is in that jar. The jars are plastic, but don’t shatter even in the deep freeze of a Chicago winter. Then I can unscrew the lid and dump a small number of fasteners into it to grab easily. Kind of like a small bowl.

Keeping those plastic jars in the cabinets, it was impossible to see what I had at the back. Now I can pull the drawers out and see exactly what I have easily. Screws in the bottom drawer since I use them the most, and nails in the upper drawer.

The peg board you see on the wall in the 3rd pic will become a french cleat system. At that same time, I will add french cleats to the side of the drawer carcass. I figured that french cleats would be too heavy for the cabinet doors. In the spring, I will be re-doing my shed and I plan on using some house wrap on the back of the cabinet doors to keep dust out.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs





10 comments so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23199 posts in 2333 days


#1 posted 11-30-2015 09:26 PM

These are great organizational cabinets for your shop.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 554 days


#2 posted 12-01-2015 02:43 AM

I like how you did the drawers – kind of like a kitchen pull out pantry, that’s a good idea!

-- Learn Relentlessly

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2457 posts in 1876 days


#3 posted 12-01-2015 03:05 AM

Nice, always good to have things organized so you can find them and not spend hours looking for them. Never have seen anyone put pegboard on doors and then add tools. Would like to hear how well that works over time.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Autorotate's profile

Autorotate

36 posts in 386 days


#4 posted 12-01-2015 04:17 AM

Very nice! I think this is going to be my next project. I need to get organized! Haha.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

111 posts in 1201 days


#5 posted 12-01-2015 04:16 PM


I like how you did the drawers – kind of like a kitchen pull out pantry, that s a good idea!

- dyfhid

That is where I got the idea. I originally wanted to do a single pull out, but pantry hardware is rather expensive. I got the 100 lb, full extension drawer slides for about $9 per pair.


Nice, always good to have things organized so you can find them and not spend hours looking for them. Never have seen anyone put pegboard on doors and then add tools. Would like to hear how well that works over time.

- woodbutcherbynight

My last set of cabinet doors were just pegboard with a pine frame nailed to the front. That worked well for over 8 years. I wasn’t sure if the strength came from the pegboard being stiffened by the frame, or the frame itself. Here, the pegboard floats in the frame and the strength is all in the glued and screwed half lap joints. We’ll see how that lasts.


Very nice! I think this is going to be my next project. I need to get organized! Haha.

- Autorotate

Steal away! I’ll be waiting to see what new ideas you add.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

337 posts in 1719 days


#6 posted 12-01-2015 04:21 PM

Nice!

any racking issue with the pullout drawers?

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

111 posts in 1201 days


#7 posted 12-01-2015 04:34 PM


Nice!

any racking issue with the pullout drawers?

- PaulHWood

Nothing other than installation issues. Since the space was so narrow, I had to install the drawer slides before assembling the carcass. Once the carcass was together, it turns out the top right slide was slightly lower than the upper left slide. And both my lower slides are slightly angled down toward the front. Everything glides nice and easy, even when full of screws and nails. Once I put the drawer fronts on, it is pretty much unnoticeable.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View RJRosa's profile

RJRosa

33 posts in 1615 days


#8 posted 12-01-2015 05:29 PM

My only question is how long have you been saving the peanut butter jars? That’s a lot of peanut butter!

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

296 posts in 700 days


#9 posted 12-01-2015 05:45 PM

Nice! I love the drawers and the peanut butter jars. We go through peanut butter like it’s a required daily supplement. So I could totally start stocking up on empty ones.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

111 posts in 1201 days


#10 posted 12-01-2015 06:07 PM

I get the peanut butter jars by eating the peanut butter. :D I may be a grown man, but I still love peanut butter. PB on toast. And PB on celery. And PB cookies. And… well, you get the idea.

I purposely buy the small jars because that size is perfect for so many things. And my parents buy the large jars. I’ve got a full rubbermaid bin full of extras waiting to be used.

I find they’re not only good for holding screws and nails, but also paint, stain, shellac, dye, mineral spirits and such in an air tight, disposable environment. I’ve been afraid to try acetone since it might eat the plastic.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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