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Cherry Bed

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Project by twist posted 11-16-2015 08:19 PM 1518 views 25 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

King sized bed made from cherry, with walnut details and poplar framing. Book-matched center panels were from a tree from the clients family home.

-- Every tool is a weapon if you hold it right -Ani DiFranco





16 comments so far

View CiscoKid's profile

CiscoKid

335 posts in 2334 days


#1 posted 11-16-2015 08:44 PM

Absolutely gorgeous! How did you bring out the warmth of the cherry like that, if you don’t mind me asking???

-- Al, Culpeper VA

View Ottacat's profile

Ottacat

424 posts in 1312 days


#2 posted 11-16-2015 08:49 PM

Really beautiful bed, love the book matched panels.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23127 posts in 2327 days


#3 posted 11-16-2015 08:52 PM

This bed is absolutely beautiful. Congratulations and welcome to Lumberjocks.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3652 posts in 1726 days


#4 posted 11-16-2015 11:28 PM

That is very beautiful.

View twist's profile

twist

11 posts in 385 days


#5 posted 11-16-2015 11:51 PM

The finish was a (light) coat of Watco oil which was thoroughly wiped off and allowed to dry for a few days. This was followed by my “standard” finish of Vinyl sealer and Satin, pre-catalyzed lacquer. Both are Mohawk products.

If you ask the experts they will say you cant spray over oil, however Ive been doing for it for decades on cherry. Just let it dry well and use a good sealer. It adds a great deal of depth to Cherry.

The Wood I used had been sitting in my clients basement for 20 years or so and had oxidized right through the thickness of the boards, so the color your looking at is essentially an aged patina. Just beautiful stuff. The center, book-matched panels were from a fruit-bearing tree from the clients parents home and were really split up. They required extensive epoxy repairs (dyed black) just to be usable lumber. They were worth it though for the figure, not to mention the sentimental value to the client.

-- Every tool is a weapon if you hold it right -Ani DiFranco

View yvrdennis's profile

yvrdennis

27 posts in 538 days


#6 posted 11-17-2015 01:46 AM

Nice bed! I’ve been looking at bed designs for a while now and this is the best one I’ve seen.

I assume it’s designed to be used without a box spring? The designs I’ve seen used slats but your mattress supports look like joists. Do you mind sharing some construction details? My wife has had a new bed on my to-do list for a long time so I’m looking for some design ideas.

As to the finish, that’s pretty similar to what we did with our maple kitchen cabinets. Dye, 1 coat of Watco danish oil, followed a week or so later by about 4 coats of pre-cat lacquer. 15 years later it still looks perfect.

View twist's profile

twist

11 posts in 385 days


#7 posted 11-17-2015 11:02 AM

No box spring. The client supplied most all of the solid wood for this, including 4/4 poplar for the slats. I thought they were too thin to lay flat so I turned them on edge like floor joists. Not flimsy any more! Traditional bed hooks joining the rails to the head and foot boards.There is notched ledger running down the inside of each rail, (glued and screwed), with matching notches on the ends of the “joists”. They just drop into place. The finished mattress height was important to the client. A bit higher than normal, 30” if I recall. The rest of the joinery is mostly floating-tenon construction, done with my multi-router. Edges were sawn, shaped, routed and rasped, then sanded. I don’t sand to nearly as high a grit as people think, I just do a really good job, and all surfaces have been dressed by hand (scrapers and planes), and had the grain raised before sanding. I only really sand to 120 or 180 depending on how much the part shows. I scuff with 180 prior to oiling to remove any fingerprints or dirt. 220 (lightly, don’t want to sand through) after oiling, 220 after sealer, then 320 between first and final coat of lacquer. Rarely do I have to rub my finished out.

Try using a sealer, you can probably eliminate two or three coats of lacquer.

-- Every tool is a weapon if you hold it right -Ani DiFranco

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

5811 posts in 1753 days


#8 posted 11-17-2015 02:37 PM

Beautiful piece—well deserved DT3.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

1731 posts in 2614 days


#9 posted 11-17-2015 02:53 PM

My goodness is this stunning.
Incredibly well done.

-- Directions are just the Manufacturer's opinion on how something should be assembled. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16951 posts in 2649 days


#10 posted 11-17-2015 03:50 PM

Great bed.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

1984 posts in 1306 days


#11 posted 11-17-2015 04:08 PM

Very nice!

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View groland's profile

groland

152 posts in 2872 days


#12 posted 11-17-2015 08:02 PM

A beautiful job—sturdy, clean lines and restrained, exquisite grain matching and detailing. I’m jealous!

View CiscoKid's profile

CiscoKid

335 posts in 2334 days


#13 posted 11-17-2015 10:09 PM



The finish was a (light) coat of Watco oil which was thoroughly wiped off and allowed to dry for a few days. This was followed by my “standard” finish of Vinyl sealer and Satin, pre-catalyzed lacquer. Both are Mohawk products.

If you ask the experts they will say you cant spray over oil, however Ive been doing for it for decades on cherry. Just let it dry well and use a good sealer. It adds a great deal of depth to Cherry.

The Wood I used had been sitting in my clients basement for 20 years or so and had oxidized right through the thickness of the boards, so the color your looking at is essentially an aged patina. Just beautiful stuff. The center, book-matched panels were from a fruit-bearing tree from the clients parents home and were really split up. They required extensive epoxy repairs (dyed black) just to be usable lumber. They were worth it though for the figure, not to mention the sentimental value to the client.

- twist

Thank you for sharing that.

-- Al, Culpeper VA

View twist's profile

twist

11 posts in 385 days


#14 posted 11-18-2015 01:18 AM

Large interior panels are veneered.maybe that’s obvious but I thought I’d mention it. Thick-ish veneer over 3/8” mdf for about a 1/2”
Panel that I glued into the frame. Really strong.

-- Every tool is a weapon if you hold it right -Ani DiFranco

View majuvla's profile (online now)

majuvla

9101 posts in 2328 days


#15 posted 11-18-2015 09:54 AM

Beautiful bed! Incredible craftmanship!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

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