LumberJocks

K.I.S.S. Hold Downs

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Project by HokieKen posted 11-16-2015 01:01 PM 2021 views 22 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have tried a few different types of shopmade hold downs that I’ve seen online over the last year or so that have a profile that allows use without spacers on the backside. One excellent example is this LJ project. I made a few different sizes with geometries along those lines to “test” but I found myself always returning to my machinist’s hold downs. Those hold downs are simple and will work with any size/shape and type of material I throw at them. The only problem is that, being steel, they can mar the surface of the wood unless you pad them with something.

So I thought, why not just make some of these out of wood? So, that’s what I did. I had a piece of scrap 5/4 red oak that looked perfect. So I milled it down to 1” and ripped it to about 1-7/8” wide. My steel hold downs are only about 1” wide but I wanted to increase the width to give a little more contact area on the work piece. Then I crosscut my board into 6 pieces that ended up being about 5” in length and milled the center recess on the bottom and cut a 3/8” slot up the center.

I initially intended to make some stepped blocks to use to shim up the back end of the clamps for different material heights. But, I decided that was too many pieces to keep up with. So, I sank a counterbored tee-nut into the back ends and threaded in a 2” carriage bolt as an adjustable shim. The wing nut on top is just to lock the bolt position so it doesn’t back off from vibration and probably isn’t necessary. The carriage bolt works for material up to 1-1/2” thick. When I have material thicker, I just use steel blocks or scrap material for spacers as shown in the last picture.

Finally, to increase the friction between the clamps and the material, I coated the bottom of the clamp toes with plasti-dip which should also help prevent marring softer woods. I put 2 coats of BLO on the clamps to finish them off.

Thanks for looking and comments and questions are always welcome!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!





10 comments so far

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#1 posted 11-16-2015 01:17 PM

Nice set of hold downs. Simplicity is always best.

By plasti-dip are you referring to the stuff that is sold to dip pliers handles in? How did the BLO interact with the plasti-dip?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1807 posts in 605 days


#2 posted 11-16-2015 01:26 PM



Nice set of hold downs. Simplicity is always best.

By plasti-dip are you referring to the stuff that is sold to dip pliers handles in? How did the BLO interact with the plasti-dip?

- WoodNSawdust

Yep, that’s the stuff. I put the plasti-dip on first and let it cure then when I put the BLO on, it just wiped right off of the rubberized material.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#3 posted 11-16-2015 01:29 PM

Thanks for the clarification.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

875 posts in 1751 days


#4 posted 11-16-2015 02:05 PM

Love this idea!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View Julian's profile (online now)

Julian

1038 posts in 2157 days


#5 posted 11-16-2015 04:27 PM

Great idea. Added to my favorites. Thanks for sharing.

-- Julian

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23199 posts in 2333 days


#6 posted 11-16-2015 04:30 PM

Nice work. They will be very useful.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Hitia17340's profile

Hitia17340

11 posts in 1047 days


#7 posted 11-16-2015 08:30 PM

Straight from the engineering workshop. We used these – in metal – on milling machines, pillar drills, shapers; even occasionally on faceplate turning on a large lathe. I note also that your hold-down bolts are placed as close as possible to the workpiece, which is where they should always be for maximum security. I need to make some!

-- Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too? Douglas Adams' take on religion.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1807 posts in 605 days


#8 posted 11-16-2015 08:43 PM



Straight from the engineering workshop. We used these – in metal – on milling machines, pillar drills, shapers; even occasionally on faceplate turning on a large lathe. I note also that your hold-down bolts are placed as close as possible to the workpiece, which is where they should always be for maximum security. I need to make some!

- Hitia17340

Yep that’s exactly where they’re from. And, I probably should have mentioned to bolt as close to the toe as possible. Thanks for pointing that out!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

1369 posts in 1749 days


#9 posted 11-16-2015 10:11 PM

Filed this one away in my brain when I need something like this. Good job and thanks

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17191 posts in 2572 days


#10 posted 10-13-2016 12:08 PM

Great idea. I love ‘em!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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