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Panel Gauge Swap with JordanP

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Project by fatandy2003 posted 11-07-2015 01:23 PM 1438 views 2 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

JordanP and I have had the pleasure of swapping a few items in the past tool and tobacco pipe swaps, so when he asked if I wanted to do a personal tool swap I immediately said “Yes.” He suggested we do panel gauges and, since I did not have a panel, it sounded good to me.

This is the panel gauge I made and sent to Jordan. It is made from curly cherry with black walnut appointments. I made the cutter from an angle bracket that I cut to size, shaped and then hardened. The beam is 24” long, and the face is about 6-1/2” by 3-1/2”.

-- -- Andy, “Those who expect to reap the blessings of liberty must undergo the fatigues of supporting it” - Thomas Paine





7 comments so far

View Pointer's profile

Pointer

369 posts in 574 days


#1 posted 11-07-2015 02:34 PM

Nicely done. I really like the contrasting black walnut. He should be pleased with this gauge.

-- Joe - - Laughter is like a windshied wiper, it doesn't stop the rain but allows us to keep going.

View Brit's profile

Brit

6716 posts in 2305 days


#2 posted 11-08-2015 12:22 AM

Very nice gauge you made there. Great job!

-- Andy -- "I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free." (Michelangelo)

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2528 days


#3 posted 11-08-2015 01:38 PM

Andy, is there something in between the brass hold down screw and the beam so it doesn’t dig in? Great looking project. Have my cutter shaped but am looking for a hardening technique, any pointers or videos you could share? Thanks Pat

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View jim65's profile

jim65

810 posts in 1396 days


#4 posted 11-08-2015 04:34 PM

Nicely done! A great addition to any tool box!

-- Jim, Marostica Italy

View fatandy2003's profile

fatandy2003

258 posts in 1706 days


#5 posted 11-08-2015 08:01 PM

Thanks for the comments!

Pat,

Nothing between screw and beam which was my biggest failure. I rounded out the bottom of the beam to avoid digging in, but it does indent the wood still.

I used a simple hardening technique that does not get it as hard as you might need for a chisel or plane. Ultimately, you are only using it to score a line in the wood with very little (if any impact). I used an acetylene torch to slowly heat the cutter until the cutting edge and a bit more were glowing red. I quenched the cutter in a cup of metal cutting oil coolant. I cleaned it off and then repeated the steps to temper the steel. Depending on the carbon content of your steel, you can also case harden it. I am no metal worker, so others may have a better process for hardening…

-- -- Andy, “Those who expect to reap the blessings of liberty must undergo the fatigues of supporting it” - Thomas Paine

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

966 posts in 2528 days


#6 posted 11-12-2015 11:55 AM

I have heard,read and watched video of this technique but don’t have any idea of the carbon content so will try it with the cutter I made and see how it works, like you said its not for banging on like a chisel. This is what I plan to use for mine. Very basic solution, right up my alley. ;-)

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View fatandy2003's profile

fatandy2003

258 posts in 1706 days


#7 posted 11-12-2015 10:59 PM

Nice, I like the brass piece above the beam. I was looking for something similar, but just counldn’t find something that fit right :(

-- -- Andy, “Those who expect to reap the blessings of liberty must undergo the fatigues of supporting it” - Thomas Paine

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