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Forming the Round Doors for the Home office

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Project by Lee A. Jesberger posted 07-11-2007 03:36 AM 3507 views 4 times favorited 25 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In the home office project, there are large curved door. At the time of writing about the project, the pictures showing the form work were mixed in with over a thousand other pictures.

Well, we found them, and I thought some people would like to see how it was done. To be honest I forgot how it was done, and had to ask my employee / partner. I guess old age is setting in early.

He is the same guy that introduced me to vacuum systems originally.

See: http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com/Vacuum_Systems_pg_1.html

The two layers of 3/8” bendy ply is inside the bag, already glued. The plywood is clamped at the bottom of the form, bent over the form, and then clamped at the top. The the bag is turned on and the vacuum is pulled. The green felt is inside the bag to permit the air to be pulled out of the entire length of the glued up parts. Without the felt, the bag would suck tight to the plywood, and leave air in the far end of the bag.

If this form were to be placed in the bag, it would be crushed in short order.

Add this technique to your repertoire and your woodworking can move up to another level with possibilities.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com





25 comments so far

View Roger Strautman's profile

Roger Strautman

649 posts in 2888 days


#1 posted 07-11-2007 03:56 AM

Lee, it looks like the door was made wider than needed because of the screwed board along the front bottom. I assume this was done cut it a to perfect width and fit? Thanks again Lee!

-- " All Things At First Appear Difficult"

View Karson's profile

Karson

34916 posts in 3155 days


#2 posted 07-11-2007 04:11 AM

What did you have as the caul on top of the veneer?

great perspective.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dan'um Style's profile

Dan'um Style

13270 posts in 2737 days


#3 posted 07-11-2007 04:50 AM

thanks for the posting. I’m following your project contributions and getting many ideas. Keep them coming. Show and tell is a great way to learn.

-- keeping myself entertained ... Humor and fun lubricate the brain

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2746 days


#4 posted 07-11-2007 04:56 AM

Karson, no caul needed as that’s what the vacuum bag is used for (applying lots and lots of pressure evenly across a surface) – if that’s what you meant.

To form the bendy ply had you just clamped it to that form previously?

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#5 posted 07-11-2007 05:21 AM

Hi Roger,

We make them oversized to permit us to square it up later. Pieces have a tendency to slide in the glue up process. The extreme pressure and the glue cause it to move rather easily.

When made oversized, we don’t have to be overly concerned about it.

Although, even if they were made to exact size, filling the holes with bondo wouldn’t be a problem.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#6 posted 07-11-2007 05:23 AM

Hi Karson,

No cauls were needed with this process. One of the fine points of vacuum bags is there is no need for cauls.

The pressure is evenly applied.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#7 posted 07-11-2007 05:24 AM

Thank you Dan.

I’ll try!

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#8 posted 07-11-2007 05:29 AM

Hi Damian,

Correct, clamp the bottom , making sure both sheets are tight to the table, bend the bendy board, clamp it at the top and turn on the vacuum.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2746 days


#9 posted 07-11-2007 06:18 AM

Oh cool, I didn’t know that would work. When I said just clamp and glue I didn’t think the press was involved. I’d assumed the bag would have tried to flatten itself pulling the sheets towards a horizontal plane. Do you use felt in the bottom of the bag too then so all the air can escape or is having it just on top good enough? I’d also just like to say thanks again for all the hints, tips and how-to’s you’ve posted, I’ve already learnt a huge amount from your posts so much appreciated.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2840 days


#10 posted 07-11-2007 06:38 AM

Your methods astound me Lee. Great stuff.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#11 posted 07-11-2007 07:29 AM

Hey Damian;

No, no need for the field on the bottom of the bendy ply. The vacuum is strong enough to pull air thru the plywood!

Thank you for the kind words. Sharing what I’ve learned is becoming one of my biggest pleasures!

A good friend friend of mine in his early seventies, was a master plasterer with skills that took a lifetime to learn.
His worst fear, which did happen, was dying before being able to share his knowledge. He was a third or fourth generation plasterer, who was absolutely incredible. I hope one day to be as good at what I do, as he was at what he did. A terrible waste!

That may have something to do with my desire to pass along what I’ve learned. And the fact that someone taught me, whether it be a book, employee,(as is often the case), or the school of hard knocks. I do have a P.H.D. from that fine institution!

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#12 posted 07-11-2007 07:31 AM

Hi bob;

Not really my methods Bob, just things shared with me, added to, and passed along!

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Don's profile

Don

2603 posts in 2931 days


#13 posted 07-11-2007 03:22 PM

When I see beautiful work processes like this, it make me feel a little foolish showing the small items that I make.

Thanks, Lee.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6704 posts in 2734 days


#14 posted 07-11-2007 03:37 PM

Don,

Some of my most favorite projects have been small items like dead blow hammers, or the cook book stands, and the like. If I can find the pictures of the dead blow hammers, I’ll post some of them. The are beautiful, and we get to use them while making other things.

They are not overwhelming like larger projects can be, take only a small amount of space, and the pride in what you made part comes along much quicker.

A work of art, is a work of art, regardless of size. (at least that’s what I tell my wife anyway) LOL

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2791 days


#15 posted 07-11-2007 08:20 PM

I don’t even know what to say to this, Lee. I’m looking at those pictures like a Labrador dog that you are speakin Chinese to. A head tilt and confused look. I truly look at your work with awe and wonder. As you can see, I haven’t had a chance to get on the site in a few days, so I’m just engorging myself with the amazing content that such skilled and knowledgeable people are providing here. Lee, you are upper echelon!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

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