LumberJocks

Bridle Joint Jig

  • Advertise with us
Project by Christopher posted 07-12-2009 02:48 AM 6404 views 3 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I threw together this jig recently to make bridle joints a little easier and more accurate. I set it up so that I can clamp my rail in and cut a kerf, then I flip it and cut the other side. The feather boards insure that the stock is consistently in the correct spot and makes my fingers happy too. Usually I will build a prototype jig and if the concept works well I will build a permanent one with all the bugs worked out. I have yet to do that for this one though.
I added a picture of a completed joint to give an example to those that haven’t seen one (I have yet to clean up the female side so please disregard the looseness!). The first pic of the joint is an example of the rail tenon coming through the style, the second picture is a dry fit taken looking down on the joint.





12 comments so far

View Christopher's profile

Christopher

573 posts in 2573 days


#1 posted 07-12-2009 02:50 AM

Wow Chris that is soo awesome! Well thank you Chris! You bet man.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112083 posts in 2230 days


#2 posted 07-12-2009 03:05 AM

Hey Chris
Thats a great job looks good and works good too. The other Chris liked it a lot .LOL

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Christopher's profile

Christopher

573 posts in 2573 days


#3 posted 07-12-2009 03:06 AM

Thanks Jim!

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#4 posted 07-12-2009 03:57 AM

I can see that this is a great jig for the cut you are making. I’m not familiar with this joint and how you use it, though…

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Hacksaw's profile

Hacksaw

184 posts in 2029 days


#5 posted 07-12-2009 05:12 AM

I am glad to see that I am not alone What is a bridle joint? Is it end to end joinery similar to a scarf joint used in boat building?Perhaps you can add a picture of a completed joint.Love the jig though hell I love all jigs I guess you could say I’m a jig junkie

-- Nothing's impossible...it just gets expensive

View Hacksaw's profile

Hacksaw

184 posts in 2029 days


#6 posted 07-12-2009 05:16 AM

Found an example on wikipedia now it makes sense similar to a mortise and tennon only cut through on 2 sides for example on a face frame you would see the tenon from the top of the rail and the side of the stile.Nice jig

-- Nothing's impossible...it just gets expensive

View Christopher's profile

Christopher

573 posts in 2573 days


#7 posted 07-12-2009 06:29 AM

Charlie, I appreciate your compliments first of all! A bridle joint is a something women smoke on the first day of marriage. It is a tradition dating back to the sixties. OK, that was a lie. In one of the pics you will see some walnut pieces with what might be called a through tenon, both all the way through the wood horizontally and vertically. Greene and Greene used them a lot. I like the joint in that it is strong and I think it looks kinda cool when exposed but I am going to go back to the trusty mortise and tenon. Wood movement alone caused some of the dadoes in the rails to be off nearly an eighth inch, which would be fine in a mortise and tenon but it is glaringly obvious in a bridle joint. The jig works well though. I added some pictures of the joint.

View mzmac's profile

mzmac

94 posts in 2320 days


#8 posted 07-12-2009 01:44 PM

Nice Joint dude pass the jig this way before you blog out. Haha Just kidding Good work. Also thats some good looking walnut.

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2733 days


#9 posted 07-12-2009 02:41 PM

Very nice jig Chris

To all those that are not familiar with the “Bridle Joint” please have a look here…
http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=bridle+joint&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=

niki

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#10 posted 07-12-2009 03:34 PM

A bridle joint is a something women smoke on the first day of marriage. It is a tradition dating back to the sixties.

Now I see the problem…. my bride didn’t smoke hers 29 years ago. She’d be in a better mood if she had.

(Thanks for the explanation, Chris.)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Christopher's profile

Christopher

573 posts in 2573 days


#11 posted 07-12-2009 08:39 PM

Thanks Matt and everyone else! The walnut is some good looking stuff, I appreciate the good deal!

View Geedubs's profile

Geedubs

143 posts in 1882 days


#12 posted 11-11-2010 05:08 PM

I am currently working on a shop cabinet and am using bridle joints on 1 1/2” X 3/4” oak that comprises the framing for drawer faces and cabinet door frames. I used my tenoning jig to produce both the tenons and open mortises. Worked like a charm. Same principles as the jig above. Personally, I really like the bridle joint. I am going to finish each joint be drilling/inserting/gluing a small dowel which I think will add both strength and visual interest.

-- Todos los dias aprendemos algo nuevo.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase