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inlay banding jig

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Project by woodbutcher posted 07-10-2009 02:19 AM 5420 views 38 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I built this jig to assist in cutting thin strips for inlaying. Basically it is two fences mounted on 1/2” plywood. There are two runners screwed to the plywood underneath and fitted in the mortise slots of the tablesaw. The front fence is made using threaded rod, tee niuts,lock and flat washers, while it’s rear stationary assist fence uses the same threaded rod with nuts,washers and wing nuts. The front fences adjustment feature allows me to cut any thickness needed and works superbly. If you decide to make something similar. I offer one sincere word of caution. Cutting any very small pieces on the tablesaw, can be very dangerous. I pay particular attention to the cut off pice and use very tiny push stick devices. However with due caution, this thing works very well for its’ intended purpose. Hope it may be of use,or give you some ideas to try as well.

Sincerely,
Ken McGinnis

-- woodbutcher north carolina





23 comments so far

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2409 days


#1 posted 07-10-2009 02:35 AM

Nice idea, Ken. Looks like a good way for cutting thin strips. What do you think about the idea of a feather board opposite of the adjustable piece? Might make it a little easier to keep the wood feeding in the right direction. Thanks for the post.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112152 posts in 2242 days


#2 posted 07-10-2009 03:01 AM

well done Ken

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15702 posts in 2883 days


#3 posted 07-10-2009 03:06 AM

Ken, that looks like a great idea. I might be missing something, though. What is the reason for sending the thin cutoff away from the blade at such a steep angle? At first look, it seems like a shallower angle on the rear fence would accomplish the same thing with less stress on the piece.

(I’m just trying to make sure I fully understand your idea before I steal it.)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1417 posts in 2161 days


#4 posted 07-10-2009 03:45 AM

What a great idea and jig…......... I had the same question as Charlie and also can see more uses for a jig like this for thins strips other than banding. Thanks for posting ….............

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3066 days


#5 posted 07-10-2009 03:57 AM

A great idea and others seem to making revisions already.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View griff's profile

griff

1206 posts in 2427 days


#6 posted 07-10-2009 03:58 AM

Looks great Ken,

-- Mike, Bruce Mississippi = Jack of many trades master of none

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

625 posts in 1938 days


#7 posted 07-10-2009 04:10 AM

That is brilliant, Ken!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View darryl's profile

darryl

1792 posts in 2991 days


#8 posted 07-10-2009 04:27 AM

that’s pretty cool… I can see that coming in handy.

nice leg work too!

View woodbutcher's profile

woodbutcher

592 posts in 2831 days


#9 posted 07-10-2009 04:45 AM

tenontim, a featherboard would work well as long as it was completely flat on the bottom of the fingers. In other words there could be no radius on the underside of the fingers, which could allow the thinner strips to ride underneath, unexpectedly. a1jim, TY Sir. CharlieM1958, excellent observation and correct call. I am actually going to modify my angle on the rear fence tomorrow. Less of an angle on the rear fence will eliminate stress on the thin cut offs. I haven’t had one break due to this stress as of yet, however all the banding I’ve cut thus far is white oak and it is very resilient. majeagle1, hope I was able to handle your question with my comment to CharlieM1958 and I hope that it can be of some benefit to you as well. The jig I mean. Karson, I’m sure glad that they are making those revisions. Maybe I can figure out how to use it properly now-LOL. griff, TY Sir. FirehouseWoodworking, TY for the compliment. But as you can see there is room for a lot of refinement yet. Ty, again Guys, I always feel better after I’ve run something by you and recieved your input, after all I’m still trying to learn something about this finicky medium we like so much!

Sincerely,
Ken McGinnis
p,s, CharlieM1958 it is however still necessary to take the square corners off two edges to form a taper prior to inlaying in the groove for the best fit-LOL

-- woodbutcher north carolina

View James's profile

James

162 posts in 1946 days


#10 posted 07-10-2009 05:03 AM

Nice jig, I’ve been looking for something of this nature. Do you experience any kickback or tearout from the thin strips? Especially when at the end of your rip cut?

-- James, Bluffton, IN

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15702 posts in 2883 days


#11 posted 07-10-2009 05:18 AM

p,s, CharlieM1958 it is however still necessary to take the square corners off two edges to form a taper prior to inlaying in the groove for the best fit-LOL

Bull…. an 8 lb. sledgehammer works fine for that. :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View woodbutcher's profile

woodbutcher

592 posts in 2831 days


#12 posted 07-10-2009 06:32 AM

hackman24, there would be kick back at the end of the rip cut if it were not for using a push piece. There must be attention paid to the ripping and adequate pressure applied both lateraly and forward all the way through the cut! CharlieM1958 suggested earlier that the angle on the rear fence appeared to be quite acute, I agree with him and will be modifying this fence tomorrow. It very well may alleviate some of the tendency to kick back the offcut, we’ll see!CharlieM1958, now I gotta buy a heavier hammer I suppose! Well I guess I still learn something new everyday.

-- woodbutcher north carolina

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14793 posts in 2341 days


#13 posted 07-10-2009 06:48 AM

Great idea. I think I’ll do one one of these days. The first thing I thought of when I saw it was the angle previously discussed. Might make the front block adjustable too for varying width and add feather boards to keep the material against it and ther rear fence.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View woodbutcher's profile

woodbutcher

592 posts in 2831 days


#14 posted 07-10-2009 06:55 AM

darryl, TY for the compliment on the leg work! I didn’t see your post earlier. I must have been too busy typing my first response. The leg is going to be used with the aprons, I believe you can just make out in the background of one of the pics’. I’m constructing a table to show my first attempt at inlaying. I hope to post the finished project here before much longer. TY again for looking.

Sincerely,
Ken McGinnis

-- woodbutcher north carolina

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2804 days


#15 posted 07-10-2009 07:53 AM

Ken -

Excellent! I am thinking we explore similar sites . . .

David

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

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