LumberJocks

Demiline Tables - Part Two

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Project by Lee A. Jesberger posted 07-06-2007 05:22 PM 2432 views 5 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Continuing with the demilune tables, the legs can be made up from solid lumber, or in the case of the table shown, veneered.

Photo one shows the glue we use. Photo two shows the cutting tools we use. Photo three shows the cutting guides we use. The far right hand one is perfect for making accurate cuts, as it has a handle to apply pressure downward, and prevents the veneeer from slipping. Again using blue painter’s tape on finished cuts is important.

Typically I used veneered legs due to the fact they are cheaper to make from poplar, and covering them with a fancy wood. The process is rather simple. After cutting the legs to the desired shape, we cut veneer slightly wider and longer than the leg blanks.

Once the pieces are ready, we coat all four sides of the legs with a coat of Tite Bond II glue. We make the legs a little longer than needed, and screw them vertically to a piece of plywood. This way it’s easier to coat all four sides of all the legs with the glue. We also glue all the strips of veneer, on one side, with the same glue. This does cause the veneer to curl up like a spiral, so it’s important to keep them under control. Maybe some push pins to hold them down will help.

After a hour or two, depending on the humidity in your area, the glue will be completely dry, and ready to be used.

Now is where you go in the house and steal your wife’s iron. ( Later, just deny stealing it, with a line like, “yeah right, I stole your iron, I’m a closet ironer”). She’ll accept that.

Starting with the back side of each leg, and the iron set to medium high, place the veneer, glue to glue against the leg, and slowly iron it on. You’ll need a veneer roller or block of hardwood with rounded edges, to firmly “seat” the veneer to the leg blank. Work from one end to the other. After it cools, tap on the veneer with your fingernail, along the entire length. If any areas aren’t adhered well, you’ll hear a hollow sounding noise.

Once your happy with the adhesion, use a laminate trimmer with a bearing bit, and working with the grain, trim the veneer tight to the leg. An easy way to determine which way to go is look at the grain. The proper way is to verify that if the router bit grabs the veneer and tries to rip it, the rip will head out of the veneer, away from the leg, instead of deeper into the veneer towards the leg.

After all the backs are done, do the sides of the legs, using the same technique. after the sides are completed, do the fronts.

When done in this order, you won’t see the edge joints. As far as the glue goes, a molecular cross linking take place with this type of glue when heated. If you need to adjust something, you can reheat it an shift it. After 24 hours, this will no longer be possible. It’s permanent.

If you decide to do this using satinwood, be advised it is on of the more difficult veneers to work with, as it chips very easily, and is kind of tough to cut with a scapel.

To be continued…

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com





21 comments so far

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2783 days


#1 posted 07-06-2007 05:26 PM

Lee, you have become an amazing asset to this community. I’m really enjoying your projects, descriptions and writeups. Thank you! This is very informative!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2738 days


#2 posted 07-06-2007 05:37 PM

Agreed, thanks for sharing. I recently built a vacuum press system so all this veneering info is really interesting to me (looking at tackling something along the lines of a Ruhlmann desk for my next project..) Have you used hot hide glue at all, seems as though it would be perfect for things like legs. I’d probably just veneer two sides of all four legs in the bag, trim then flip and do the remaining faces for no other reason than I’d get to play with my new toy :)

I do like the closet ironer excuse though, could have come in handy last week when I stole it to do some edge banding :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2885 days


#3 posted 07-06-2007 05:44 PM

Lee -

I agree with our Canadian Spiderman Superhero’s comments. I really enjoy reading your posts. I am a novice veneering student trying to learn all I can about different veneering techniques so this was an especially interesting post for me to read.

Your cutting guides photo – How are the guides on the left of the photo used?

I had some trouble following the part where you describe the veneer application. As I understand the process, you have coated the veneer and table legs with glue that has dried and you are using heat to reactivate the glue when you apply the veneer. Are you putting on all 4 veneer faces and then trimming? If so, do you butt one edge up against an over hanging perpndicular face?

Sorry for all the questions! Part of the learning process . . .

Thanks!

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#4 posted 07-06-2007 05:56 PM

Hi Tom,

Thank you very much. When do you have time to save the world?

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#5 posted 07-06-2007 06:02 PM

Hi Damian,

Yeah, new toys are great. I do use hot hide glue, but for this application, it’s not worth the trouble.

As for doing two sides at a time in the bag, it would an undesirble edge exposed. that’s why I do it in the order that I do. Just a quirk on my part I suppose. I like the process I am using though.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#6 posted 07-06-2007 06:15 PM

Hi David;

Feel free to ask all the question you want. That way I can learn too, as I make it up! LOL

The use of the other cutting guides are fully explained, with photos @

http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com/Veneered_Borders.html

Regarding the heat process, you got it!

Regarding the legs, no, I trim each piece prior to starting the next side.

Hope this helps,

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2833 days


#7 posted 07-06-2007 07:35 PM

Ditto to all of the above Lee. Great contributions, your methodology is very interesting.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2738 days


#8 posted 07-06-2007 09:35 PM

To be honest I’d skimmed the bit where you mention the order you apply the veneer, and it does make sense to do it that way. Is hide glue a pain to work with? Never used it myself, only read about it.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#9 posted 07-06-2007 10:28 PM

Hi Damiam ,

Just made it to your projects page. Great Work!

Yes, hide glue is a pain to work with, especially for the aminal they get from.

There is a learning curve invovled, it is smelly, messey, sticky, but useful, particulary when working on antiques.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 3057 days


#10 posted 07-07-2007 02:24 AM

Great posting, Lee. This is the second time I’ve heard of putting the glue, letting it dry and then using an iron to make the veneer adhere to the wood. Between you and Karson, I’m going to become a veneering junky, soon. LOL. Thanks for the play by play.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#11 posted 07-07-2007 02:26 AM

Hey Os;

My pleasure. It really take your projects to a whole new level.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Don's profile

Don

2603 posts in 2923 days


#12 posted 07-07-2007 06:55 AM

Good information, Lee.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#13 posted 07-07-2007 08:53 AM

Hi Don;

Thanks, I’m looking around for photos of other tables I’ve done. Some of them are really beautiful!

You know what’s funny is after a while I forget about having made certain things.

I went to a clients house one day, one that I renovated in Philadelphia. I had to go to the third floor home office with the clients wife to check some furniture.

When I walked into the room, I noticed a cherry bookcase. I said wow, that’s a beautiful bookcase. She looked at me kind of funny. I asked her why she looked at me like that. She said You built it.

Nothing like feeling like a dummy.

One other time I met with a potential client, who wanted wall panels and chair rails, and a few other goodies.

She had a magazine to show me what she wanted. I explained to her she should have a designer help with laying the wall panels out, as the proportions are critical to a good looking job. She didn’t know any, so I made arrangements to bring a designer I worked with. This guy was very talented.

When she showed him the magazine picture, he asked me if I recognize it. I said no, which I didn’t. He said you should, you built it. Sure enough I read part of the article, and it was a job I did! Tht lady was thrilled to death to get the same designer and contractor as the one in the picture.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2993 days


#14 posted 07-07-2007 04:09 PM

Thanks for the info, I want to learn veneering, this will be helpful.again thanks jockmike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6699 posts in 2726 days


#15 posted 07-07-2007 08:49 PM

Hi Mike, and thank you.

Go for it, it’s great fun.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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