LumberJocks

Frames

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Project by Blogarican posted 09-21-2015 08:12 PM 479 views 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These are couple of framing projects that I made as I was learning exactly how in the world to make a frame, Note: don’t attempt to make multiple anythings when you have never made one of any-thing… lot’s of learning going on here, I made a jig to cut the 45 angle on my table saw, also learned that no matter how careful you are when framing a mirror, “it will break!” oh and one last thing I learned. Paint does wonders to cover up my lack of woodworking skills… I had a great time making these, great project to hone your skills, routing, cutting angles, making jigs. I’ve gotten much better but it’s still a work in progress, also for wood I like select pine or poplar it’s cheap enough that I don’t mind painting it and it’s nice enough to accept a decent stain. As usual thanks for this forum, there are some amazing projects and information.

-- Gabe, North Carolina www.blogarican.com





2 comments so far

View albachippie's profile

albachippie

758 posts in 2502 days


#1 posted 09-23-2015 03:17 PM

Nicely done Gabe. The finish really suits the style. How did you achieve the weathered look?
Great work, keep learning,

Garry

-- Garry fae Bonnie Scotland - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Garry-Macdonald-Woodwork/425518554215355?ref=hl

View Blogarican's profile

Blogarican

17 posts in 463 days


#2 posted 09-24-2015 08:18 PM

Nicely done Gabe. The finish really suits the style. How did you achieve the weathered look?
Great work, keep learning,

Garry

Thanks Garry, I do a number of things to achieve the weathered, or patina, or distress looks, once I’m done painting the project, I will apply a coat of stain with an old rag or shirt, very light on the stain and I wipe it off almost immediately after applying, once it dries I polyurethane the piece and lightly sand. If it’s a distressed look well then I try and replicate a distress point where a piece would incur some damage, corners, legs etc. I sand down and around until I am satisfied with it, and then I use a “dry brush” technique to add some depth to the piece. Dry brush is nothing more than lightly dipping a small brush into some flat black paint, and almost dusting the area you want to apply the mark.. well hope this answers your question. have a great day!

-- Gabe, North Carolina www.blogarican.com

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