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Made some Darts and a YouTube Video

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Project by Mike posted 09-06-2015 05:35 PM 682 views 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Made some Darts and a YouTube Video
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Hi all;

I recently completed the Penn State Industries steel tip darts kit (PKDART2).

I also made my first YouTube build video and posted it here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SM0595oZSLI).

Let me know what you think!

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw





5 comments so far

View ken_c's profile

ken_c

314 posts in 2625 days


#1 posted 09-06-2015 09:28 PM

I haven’t seen anyone use a skew that way from start to finish, mesmerizing… :-P

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

781 posts in 2467 days


#2 posted 09-06-2015 09:41 PM

That was cool to watch. We’ve been getting into darts at the office recently.

How do they throw? What is the deal with weight? Do you buy a certain weight set and the wood is negligible or are you somehow shooting for a target wood weight?

Also, what’s the deal with the sawdust? is that polishing trick?

Thank you.

View Mike's profile

Mike

406 posts in 2150 days


#3 posted 09-07-2015 05:46 PM

Thanks Guys!

Todd,

They throw awesome. Way better than the bar darts out there or even a lot that you get in the sporting good stores.

The way the are weighted is that the kit comes with Lead Wool (like Steel Wool, just Lead). You take all your parts and put them on a scale. You weigh out the Lead Wool to calibrate the dart to the final weight. You then install the Lead into the body tube and compress the living hell out of it since there isn’t a lot of room in there. The wood weight for the most part is negligible, but on some of the darts on the scale there was a 0.1 oz (2.8 g) difference.

The saw dust is sort of a sanding trick I learned some where. It helps to burnish and remove small scratches from the work piece. Since it is the same hardness as the work piece it acts as an abrasive.

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

781 posts in 2467 days


#4 posted 09-08-2015 05:43 PM

That is really pretty cool. I am in the process of buying a lathe and this might be a great early project.

Thanks!

View Mike's profile

Mike

406 posts in 2150 days


#5 posted 09-09-2015 02:50 AM

Let me know if you need any help :)

-- look Ma! I still got all eleven of my fingers! - http://www.lepelstatcrafts.etsy.com - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCppWfrYGXCr5lm9uW-Fpqqw

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