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Gimmicky Turning

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Project by stefang posted 06-11-2009 06:31 PM 1838 views 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a portable drinking vessel. I found the concept in a book a few years back. The decorations are mine. It is about 2” high and 2” in dia. It has stickwork inlaid into the top. If you’re not sure what that is just ask and I will tell you about it. The main wood is birch. It is usable and is watertight. Just made it for a laugh. Hope you like it.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.





11 comments so far

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 3160 days


#1 posted 06-11-2009 07:16 PM

Ingenious. Like the Russian Dolls concept. What tools did you use to make the round segments?

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 3169 days


#2 posted 06-11-2009 07:26 PM

I used a miniature parting tool (hot and dusty job). The whole thing was made out of one small piece of Birch.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View kerflesss's profile

kerflesss

182 posts in 3203 days


#3 posted 06-11-2009 07:41 PM

Mike, I remember seeing one a long time ago. Truly a test of patience.

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 3169 days


#4 posted 06-11-2009 08:03 PM

Not too bad kerfless, but a little nitty picky. By the way I liked your fishing rod rack. I’ll have to show it to my son, he’s a fly fisher fanatic. Looks like you might be too. I tried fishing (never mind with flies), but never caught anything so I turned to woodworking. I’m not much better at that, but at least there isn’t anyone around to see all my dumb mistakes. My oldest grandson just looks at the water and the fish jump out and surrender to him. Is it aptitude or luck?

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View kerflesss's profile

kerflesss

182 posts in 3203 days


#5 posted 06-11-2009 08:09 PM

Hey Mike, the technique works for all kinds of things. My rack for my lathe tools is based on the same thing. The angle on the bottom makes it work… By the way FISHING + 6 Pack + fresh air + the out doors = Whooo cares what you catch (heh, heh).

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3996 days


#6 posted 06-11-2009 08:32 PM

I bet a lot of skill and meticulous detail went into making this.
Great job.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 3169 days


#7 posted 06-11-2009 08:34 PM

That’s true Kerfless, but what is fresh air compared to 1 micron dust particles? I’m not sure MsDebbieP how much went into making it, but the original designer was pretty clever.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

18087 posts in 3511 days


#8 posted 06-12-2009 12:35 AM

Neat little gadget :-))

What did you do? Cut all the parts of one little wood cylinder and they have never been apart?

What is stick work? Making the design out of tooth sticks? :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 3169 days


#9 posted 06-12-2009 11:29 AM

That’s about it Bob.

Stickwork is made by taking a board and cutting the end off it at a 45 degree angle and in a length equal to the thickness of the board. The result is a diamond shaped cutoff.

If you cut a bunch of these with contrasting woods, you can then glue them together to form patterns, a star for example. I first make pairs then quads and so forth and use tape and/or rubber bands as clamps. In the end you wind up with a rough cylinder shape as long as the width of your boards, and with a nice side grain pattern on the ends. The individual pieces have to fit perfectly together or they don’t look good. You need to get very clean cuts on your saw.I also do a little careful hand sanding with the sandpaper adhered to a very flat surface.

You can then take this rough cylinder and turn it smooth on the lathe. Then you can cut off 1/16” thick slices of it in the bandsaw whenever you need an inlay for a project. If you want to shape the inlay after it is glued into your project then a thicker slice would be necessary.

You don’t really need to turn the glue-up. I made a star shape piece for a box that wasn’t turned. I’ll be posting it in the near future, so you can get a better idea of what it is. The diamonds in the pattern on the little vessel above were cut from 1/4” thick boards. I didn’t have any contrasting boards in that one, so it doesn’t show up very well in the photos.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Splinterman's profile

Splinterman

23072 posts in 3196 days


#10 posted 06-12-2009 12:57 PM

Sweet job Stefang….nice concept.

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

3820 posts in 3429 days


#11 posted 07-28-2009 10:12 PM

nice job

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

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