LumberJocks

Hot Tub in Macrocarpa

  • Advertise with us
Project by andyboy posted 1904 days ago 2798 views 4 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This has been a fun project. $9000. to buy and about $400. to make. I heat it with a wood fired wet back that I paid $20. for. Made from Macrocarpa. 1500mm diametre. Takes about 2 and a half hours to get toasty. Never thought I would get it too hot….but I did. Added some cold and all was well. Wife burnt her leg on it one night….not a popular boy!

-- Andy Halewoodworker. You can't finish if you don't finish. So finish it, because finish is everything.





8 comments so far

View tomakazi's profile

tomakazi

645 posts in 1914 days


#1 posted 1904 days ago

Great job Andy, what an idea!! looks like it’s going to lasta while. If your wife keeps burning herself you can always use it to make wine.

-- I didn't go to college, I was too busy learning stuff - Ted Nugent

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2315 days


#2 posted 1904 days ago

i was wondering who uses Macrocarpa outside of NZ :-)
Should be handy for those cold winter nights…

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#3 posted 1904 days ago

Hey Andy
This id one cool hot tub. How did you put the bottom in?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2382 posts in 2069 days


#4 posted 1903 days ago

Yes, like Jim I’m wondering about the build. I’m fascinated by this I’d love to see more revealing pictures.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View andyboy's profile

andyboy

492 posts in 1904 days


#5 posted 1903 days ago

If you are going to have a crack at this, If you can afford cedar then that is the best, or maybe redwood. I drew up the 1500mm dia on sketchup and worked out about 36 staves. make 40. I made a knife for the spindle moulder. With this I concaved and convexed the edges of the staves so they interlock.
The bottom of each stave is cut out with the same cutter used for the staves. Next time I would use a square dado cut…better seal.
Slap it all together with help from the kids and a tie down then install the stainless steel straps.
As I had a few problems with leaks, I painted the beast. I tell you, there is more to these than I thought, but fun learning.

-- Andy Halewoodworker. You can't finish if you don't finish. So finish it, because finish is everything.

View andyboy's profile

andyboy

492 posts in 1904 days


#6 posted 1408 days ago

Sorry I don’t have any more pics of the build. I made a jig for the spindle moulder that enabled me to run a cove across the grain about 4 inches from the bottom of each stave. I rounded the edge of the bottom and pieced the staves together around the bottom. The bottom is just coved together. I always new this would be the problem area. I named this tub the “Eddisen Tub” as I learnt 500 ways not to make a hot tub.

I did end up trying to glue the bottom because I was loosing a bit much water. I let it dry out too much and the bottom severely shrunk. Not to be out done I had some weed mat in the garage that I painted on to the bottom. That stopped the leaks and it is still functional. I also put hemp around the edge of the bottom. Hope that goes a little way toward explaining how the bottom is done.

Next time I would do the bottom out of marine ply or try to do a kind of spiral from the centre out. Probably the best thing to do is to use the tried and proven timber “Cedar” or “Red Wood” but my percentage of Scottish blood is too great….he he.

-- Andy Halewoodworker. You can't finish if you don't finish. So finish it, because finish is everything.

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

1941 posts in 883 days


#7 posted 813 days ago

Nice work, andyboy. I want to make a cistern and this is kinda what I was thinking, only a bit taller. Also, what is the angle of the hot tub’s side wall? Looks like a right angle but I’m not sure. I am thinking about a 7-10 degree side wall angle for the cistern.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View andyboy's profile

andyboy

492 posts in 1904 days


#8 posted 812 days ago

Hey Don. I worked out how many I need using sketch up. The joints are knuckle joints so they can pivot to suit whatever the angle. If you do go for an angle joint I would put a bead groove in each join and even go as far as putting a length of rubber down each join.

Cheers,

Andy.

-- Andy Halewoodworker. You can't finish if you don't finish. So finish it, because finish is everything.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase