LumberJocks

“barber chaired” stump

  • Advertise with us
Project by TopamaxSurvivor posted 06-10-2009 05:32 AM 2816 views 0 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I found this “barber chaired” stump along a logging road near our Tree Farm. Thought it might make a good post for any potential loggers looking to make their own lumber. Notice in the picture, the under cut and back cut are the same elevation. This is a relatively small tree, about a foot or 16” in diameter. This can happen even if the under cut and back cuts are properly done. It is quite dangerous if the logger is standing behind where the end of the tree kicks out and back. It can go down either direction too. It is especially common cutting alder in the Pacific Northwest. This is a maple stump.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence





19 comments so far

View Christopher's profile

Christopher

573 posts in 2606 days


#1 posted 06-10-2009 05:51 AM

It is gorgeous where you live. I am here in South Dakota, the land of flatness and wind…

View Andy's profile

Andy

1538 posts in 2594 days


#2 posted 06-10-2009 05:57 AM

I agree,this is very dangerous,and very common in Alder and heavy leaning trees.
The problem here is that the face cut is too shallow,which did not allow the tree to hinge(bend over) enough before the two faces touched.Not good!
As a professional timber faller,I learned to cut out a shallow face on leaners( front to back) but deep (top to bottom )which gives it lots of hinge room before it closes up.And instead of just cutting straight in for the back cut,try boring in just behind your hinge,and cutting backwards,stopping just a few inches from exiting out the back.This leaves a “strap” which you then snip off with the tip of the bar.Another safe way to cut a heavy leaner is to not face the tree under the lean,but off to the side,which takes the stress off.I find this the safest method to fall Alders.This cant always be done because the tree may need to be felled in the direction it leans.Jacks can often be used on a larger tree and tipped where you want.
If you dont have experience cutting these types of trees..Then dont! These types of trees can kill you.
Get a professional.

-- If I can do it, so can you. www.artboxesbyandy.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14849 posts in 2361 days


#3 posted 06-10-2009 06:32 AM

Andy, you’d get a kick out of my wife’s cousin. He has a falling business in Oregon. He sends a guy out with 5 gallons of gas and 5 gallons of oil. They empty the cans falling timber in a day! He will set up a fall of 100 or 200 trees. When he gets to the key tree, it will knock the whole hillside down :-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View kiwi1969's profile

kiwi1969

609 posts in 2127 days


#4 posted 06-10-2009 07:40 AM

The very reason I buy my timber from the mill. Definiatly a pro,s job this one.

-- if the hand is not working it is not a pure hand

View degoose's profile

degoose

7038 posts in 2040 days


#5 posted 06-10-2009 09:39 AM

Christopher. My catapult is bigger than your catapult and you can’t have my money. :LOL.
Bob, love the area you have chosen to live in.,.
Kiwi how’s the P.I. Still lovely like it was when I was there in the 70’s

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View stefang's profile

stefang

13251 posts in 2020 days


#6 posted 06-10-2009 06:25 PM

Thanks for the warning Bob and Andy. I’ll be sticking to the smaller trees. We have a lot of alder here in Norway. It is very nice wood, but underused, I don’t know why. Maybe it doesn’t lend itself to manufacturing processes. It’s a shame more hobby woodworkers don’t use it more. I get a hunk of it once in a while and find it particularly nice to carve in. It carves like hot butter compared to Birch.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14849 posts in 2361 days


#7 posted 06-10-2009 10:03 PM

I didn’t know alder was so easy to carve. I have some big blocks, but haven’t gotten around to trying it yet. My daddy-in-law taught me to fall. The barber chair issue was a constant warning. He’d been a logger. He dropped 80-100’ firs right by his cabin and along a power line. Every one fell right where he wanted it.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View fred4999's profile

fred4999

107 posts in 2170 days


#8 posted 06-30-2009 06:05 PM

Good comments all. My pet peeve is that some folks who buy a chain saw is automatically an expert feller. I see that in the logs I saw for people. Some of the butt cuts are splintered so bad the whole log is almost ruined.

I grew up helping my dad cut pulpwood here in Georgia, loading by hand before the cable loaders. Nothing like the pine aroma of a freshly cut tree.

-- Fred, Georgia

View baldoctor's profile

baldoctor

6 posts in 1365 days


#9 posted 01-25-2011 12:45 AM

In my research of the name ‘Baldock’, I found several references that in England the name used for the spike on a stump after felling tree was called a ‘Baldock’.

I came to your name because my friends say you are my ‘Doppelganger’. What do you think?

-- baldoctor

View oleCB's profile

oleCB

77 posts in 1367 days


#10 posted 01-25-2011 04:54 AM

I learned the hard way that if you donno how to fell a big tree properly, DON’T. I ruined a very nice walnut tree last year in just the same manner. I thought I’d cut into the sides far enough, I didn’t have my side cut aligned very well. The tree split right up the middle for over 8 feet. It should have knocked my d$%k in the dirt but I felt if give in time and jumped away!

-- There was only one perfect carpenter... It wasn't me!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14849 posts in 2361 days


#11 posted 01-25-2011 05:02 AM

Not sure about Merry O’l England, but the loggers here in Water World call ‘em barber chair for some unknown reason?? At least that is all I have heard them called.

Not sure about ‘Baldock’, stunt double, maybe ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14849 posts in 2361 days


#12 posted 01-25-2011 05:17 AM

oleCB Must be a lag in cyberspace, you weren’t there when I posted. 8 minutes is a long way at the speed of light ;-))

The stump in the picture is obviously by a fellow who has absolutely no business trying to fall trees!! I was taught by my daddy-in-law. He could lay 100’ firs down and literally drive a stake with the top. The worst one i ever felled was for a friend on his home site before the build. 120’ doug fir. I got lucky, it was rotten in the center, but the sides grew even or the rot was concentric. You never know what will happen when you find the tree is hollow;-(( They can turn around on the stump ;-(( That one went where I wanted it to go by the grace of God.

WE have a lot of alders here. They are notorious for splitting when you fall them. They are always showering the place with limbs in the wind ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View oleCB's profile

oleCB

77 posts in 1367 days


#13 posted 01-26-2011 06:28 PM

The young guy I contracted with had cut a lot of walnut. He would cut from the center through and leave 4 corners (ears) holding the tree up and in place. He would then cut the 2 ears down (vertically) closest to the direction of the fall and last the 2 corners back. He cut 91 trees here and I don’t think he split any.

-- There was only one perfect carpenter... It wasn't me!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14849 posts in 2361 days


#14 posted 01-26-2011 07:51 PM

Sounds like he had a lot of experieince with walnut and knew how to prevent problems. Guess we had better keep my wife’s cousin (mentioned above) out of the walnut grove. A couple hundred walnuts in one fall might result in kindling instead of a train full of logs ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View oleCB's profile

oleCB

77 posts in 1367 days


#15 posted 01-28-2011 05:04 AM

Top, I’d say.. We still have a bunch of seconds laying around here still! A large part of which will be firewood!

-- There was only one perfect carpenter... It wasn't me!

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase