LumberJocks

pippy oak table, first wedged tennon

  • Advertise with us
Project by Ollie posted 06-08-2009 10:23 PM 1738 views 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This table I made just because i loved the crazy grain and pattern of the pippy oak board .
The legs and shelf are made from new kiln dried oak, while the stretchers are from a reclaimed oak floorboard but the colour matches fine once I planed the first few mm of the floorboard. The wedges are american black walnut. I just thought i would try them out and i really like the contrast in colour.
I removed the bark from the outside edges and did A LOT of sanding to smooth the edges of the top.
The shelf is just one piece and can be removed, its just rebated to fit over the lower stretchers.

-- Ollie, UK.





11 comments so far

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2649 days


#1 posted 06-08-2009 10:32 PM

I really like the table but I have a question regarding the wedges. Aren’t they supposed to be in the middle of the tenon (or at least not right on the sides)

Like this

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Ollie's profile

Ollie

146 posts in 1932 days


#2 posted 06-08-2009 10:38 PM

Hi yes perhaps you are right, but I have seen this method of wedge used in the old sliding sash and venitian windows I used to repair. The main reason I put the wedges to either side is because i did not want to split the very hard oak pin as it is quite small. thanks for commenting Damian..

-- Ollie, UK.

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2649 days


#3 posted 06-08-2009 10:40 PM

Fair enough, I do like the way it looks, that’s quite a slab :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2101 posts in 2386 days


#4 posted 06-08-2009 11:10 PM

i guess that in this case, you rely on the glu bond to be the strength of the wedge. While this doesn’t make sense to me if you were to build this project without a strong glue, I can’te really see a problem with it if the glue gets the job done. That is some beautiful timber. a nice simple design lets the wood speak for itself. nice.

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 1983 days


#5 posted 06-08-2009 11:56 PM

Also curious as to how long you actually sanded to get the tenons looking that smooth.

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 1983 days


#6 posted 06-09-2009 12:00 AM

How angled are the wedges? I tried this (angled wedge) for a bench and had a very difficult time. I was supposed to be able to squeeze the tenons to assure a super tight fit. I made the bench in pine on purpose figuring it should be easy to squeeze. I ended up having to almost remove all the angle and make it a straight tenon. Is there a trick you know?

View Ollie's profile

Ollie

146 posts in 1932 days


#7 posted 06-09-2009 12:33 AM

Hi mtkate. I just kind of free handed the angle but i guess about 15 degrees . first i cut the mortise square and checked for fit then i chiselled the angles, I just guessed what looked good and transferred it to each corner. So I suppose the angle was governed by the timbers thickness really. Then i cut some wedges, again by eye but a little big and just planed each one with a block plane until they fitted nice, then some glue and a tap from my hammer. It didn`t take long after the first one. As for the sanding of the tenons , I trimmed them first with a flush saw (japanese style) then a quick plane with a low angle block plane which was quite smooth, then through to 320 grit.

-- Ollie, UK.

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2649 days


#8 posted 06-09-2009 01:52 AM

@mtkate: I think the trick is to drill a small hole in the tenon and then cut to that, the hole allows the wood either side of it to bend (I’ve never done it, but I think that’s the idea)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View jason434's profile

jason434

18 posts in 1935 days


#9 posted 06-09-2009 03:47 AM

amazing lumber, where do you get your pippy oak from? i would love to try it out sometime

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3161 posts in 2481 days


#10 posted 06-09-2009 03:04 PM

That a beauty of a table, and the wedge make a nice accent as well. This should bring great years of uses, thanks for posting…Blkcherry

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 1983 days


#11 posted 06-11-2009 01:49 AM

Ollie – very impressed for freehand. Even when I go to 320 it always never seems to be enough to make it look as nice as yours does.

Damian – that sounds scary to me but I just might try it someday. Interesting tip!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase