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Project by littlecope posted 05-27-2009 11:48 PM 2039 views 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I had occasion to drag out my old drafting board recently and thought I’d share the stand that I made back in “79 or “80. Amazingly, I still have all the parts, even the pegs! I got the idea for the construction of the thing from an old Woodwright’s Shop episode about brick making. They used original and newly fashioned molds, similarly made, with opposed wedges in slots to hold them together, for the formation of bricks. I substituted pegs for the wedges, so the stand could be easily broken down and stored.
I wish I had pictures, but I also made a snow mold from that idea that was a real gas! I never really did much more than experiment, but the first winter I had it, I built a wall with it several feet high, with a couple jogs in it, about 30’ long in about 2 hours! The wall was the last thing to melt in the yard, lasting all the way into April. Every snow storm to this day, while shoveling, I imagine what a 2-3 person determined crew, with a few of those molds and unlimited material ready at hand, could do in a day’s work! I always thought a maze would be cool, but one could build a garage if they had a mind to. Or…?
I can never discuss Drafting without paying respects to my old shop drafting teacher, Mr. Bowers. It was he who challenged me to draw the third picture in high school. He was the nicest old fella, and a great teacher, one of the ones that taught because they genuinely loved to do it. A former machinist and avid woodworker, we missed him for a few weeks that year due to an accident he suffered in his home work shop. When he returned, he sat all us kids around him and told us his simple, but unfortunate story. Working on the table saw in his basement shop, his son came down the stairs to tell him he had a phone call. In that moment of distraction, when he turned to his son, he removed the top joints of his pinkie and ring fingers on his right hand. The lesson for that day, with graphic illustration and missing parts of fingers, was to pay attention and stay focused on what you’re doing! A good lesson, which I’ve always tried to remember!
The picture itself is of the drawing that I made of the “Raritan”, gleaned from the construction series of drawings from old issues of Live Steam magazine.
Oh, the drafting board was store-bought, along with the T-square, from the local Arts Supply Shop for the ungodly amount of $12.49! Outrageous! In 1974 money…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.





14 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112076 posts in 2228 days


#1 posted 05-27-2009 11:55 PM

Thats a great idea

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BarryW's profile

BarryW

1015 posts in 2558 days


#2 posted 05-28-2009 12:51 AM

Excellent…and why not…as much as I like learning the computer drafting programs and whatever…sometimes just drawing it makes it seems simpler inside the mind…something about actually drawing….that’s organic.

-- /\/\/\ BarryW /\/\/\ Stay so busy you don't have time to die.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2327 days


#3 posted 05-28-2009 08:32 AM

great idea. Do they teack real drafting anymore? Seems like one would have to know the basics to do a good job in CAD.

Your story of 1974 dollars reminds me of spending about $20 1967 for a Pickett slide rule, Now for less than $20, 2009 (< $4 1967) you can get a basic scientific calculator that will do everything the slide rule will do and keep track of the digits to infinity!!

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2905 posts in 2153 days


#4 posted 05-28-2009 01:28 PM

Thanks, Guys! BarryW: Drawing on paper is the only way to go for me. I haven’t used this in many years, usually drawing freehand, but I needed some precision on a simple plan I wanted. I admire and respect those who use computer programs to produce drawings, but it’s beyond me. I would rather just draw what I need to, rather than trying to figure out the process of creation. I’m somewhat old fashioned. One of my favorite quotes is from an old farmer friend of mine who, when computers were first starting to proliferate, asked, “I’m sure these computers are great things, but can they shoe a horse?”
TopomaxSurvivor: I couldn’t tell you if they still teach Drafting, but they surely ought to! It’s been almost 35 yrs. since I went to high school. I pass by it almost every day and still see the Wood Shop class in full swing! Those kids are lucky! They have the best surface planer I’ve ever seen, an absolute beast of a machine, 24” throat, solid cast iron construction, a real antique but a great performer! It’s funny you should mention a slide rule. I, too, have one of those quaint calculators, a Sterling, purchased for about $20 in the early seventies. To be honest, I’ve hardly ever used it. As you say, they have calculators that do the job quicker and more accurately for a fraction of the cost, and you don’t need an engineering degree to operate them ;-)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2327 days


#5 posted 05-29-2009 03:25 AM

When I was an apprentice electrician, i asked the teachers if slide rule accuracy was good enough since you can only do about 3 digits accurately. They always said if i knew how to use it, it was good enough! :-))

My son was selected a one of the 10 best drafting students in high school in the late 80’s. He thought he wanted to be a draftsman, but I told him it would all be CAD within a few years. He became a network engineer. Now he can link all the CADs ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4368 posts in 1688 days


#6 posted 07-24-2010 09:19 PM

Mike, I dearly remember my old Technical Drawing days. The drawing board, the tee square, set squares, compasses etc. I learn’t to do everything by hand, nowadays I use CAD, and think that people must find it hard if they don’t understand the basics. To understand the mundain behind the magic is a powerful thing. It must be part of the reason people marvel at the everyday geometric stuff I come up with. They never had the basic training.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View patron's profile

patron

13033 posts in 1992 days


#7 posted 07-24-2010 09:42 PM

i have a drafting table set up in my living room
and use it whenever i need detailed drawings

i may get to understand sketch-up someday

but for now drawing is good

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4368 posts in 1688 days


#8 posted 07-24-2010 09:44 PM

Drawing is always good. The manual route never goes down due to power failure. So is basic math. I cannot believe this. I blew out the yard manager at work. We had a coil of pipe. Three turns. I said about 1.3m across times pi times three approx.’ 12 metres. He gave me a strange look. Measured around the outside, did the times three and said ‘Yeah OK’ still with the dirty look. His manager said ‘you’re wasted here’. ‘No’ i said’ after the third beer tonight I’ll be wasted’. Is basic maths not taught anymore?

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View patron's profile

patron

13033 posts in 1992 days


#9 posted 07-24-2010 09:50 PM

all i have to worry about

is a faulty operator !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2905 posts in 2153 days


#10 posted 07-24-2010 10:28 PM

I came across my old drawings from those days and can’t get over how good it was… and how much I produced… I was taking Geometry at the same time, in the head of the math dept. Mrs. Vogel’s Class… and loving it!! Scored 100% out of a possible 100, and the bonus 25% question as well for 125… on the final…
Where did I go wrong? :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View patron's profile

patron

13033 posts in 1992 days


#11 posted 07-24-2010 10:41 PM

round hamburgers

and

square meat loaf ?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4368 posts in 1688 days


#12 posted 07-24-2010 11:14 PM

None of us went wrong. We just know more than we need to….... Knowledge is power, power to the people.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Leonard5's profile

Leonard5

366 posts in 1344 days


#13 posted 07-11-2014 07:08 PM

Hi Mike. Is there anyway i can get a copy of that plan of the train?

-- Leonard H.

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2905 posts in 2153 days


#14 posted 07-11-2014 08:01 PM

Here's one place…
The plans were featured (in about 26 installments) in Live Steam Magazine many years ago…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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