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No Bucket Dust Deputy Shop Vac Cabinet

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Project by The2CarGarageShop posted 08-09-2015 12:02 PM 3413 views 26 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

There are a lot of Dust Deputy vac carts out there. I did not like that that’s all they were, there was no other use for them and they take up valuable floor space in a small shop. I also don’t like the idea of fighting with the bucket lid and hoses every time you need to empty the bucket. This is my answer. The cart surface is 2’x3’ giving me a nice work surface. It’s 36” high like my bench and air compressor cabinet. The dust deputy is protected in it’s “cage” so it can not be damaged while moving things around. It is fixed in place and never moves. It empties into a pull out box in the chamber below. It has 1.7 times the capacity of a 5 gallon bucket. i used a router to recess the handle on the container. The container is just slightly smaller than the compartment. I used weather stripping on the top edges of the container to keep dust from getting outside the container while in the compartment. I used a 15 gauge 15’ extension cord that connects into the power box on the outside. There are two live outlets and a switch to the outlet inside the vac compartment. I have a 110 CFM fan inside the vac compartment that is on continuously to vent the heat. I use a remote switch from Fast Cap to turn the vac on and off. This has worked out very well. There is even a wrist band so you can keep the switch real handy. The vac is connected to the Dust Deputy with 2” PVC pipe. This has worked well in all regards. I have a nice work surface, the dust collection works well, the ease of On/Off with the remote switch is great and the vac is muffled.





14 comments so far

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2595 days


#1 posted 08-09-2015 06:40 PM

Nice design! Looks like you have tailored it for a perfect fit.

Questions – How does the exhaust air escape the large bin? Does the 110 cfm fan help with the exhaust flow?

Thanks – just curious…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View The2CarGarageShop's profile

The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#2 posted 08-09-2015 07:02 PM

Thanks Steve, I put a 6” wide vertical piece in the back left corner. This makes a chase/chimney from top to bottom. There is a 4” hole in the top of this vertical piece where I attached the fan and I drilled exhaust holes in the floor of the cabinet in the back left corner. When I’m going to make dust, I flip the switch on the outside of the cabinet which turns the fan on. The fan runs all of the time and I turn the vac on as needed with the remote switch when I’m running whatever machine it is hooked up to. When I’m done making dust, I flip the switch and it cuts the power to the fan and vac. So far I’ve had no issues with heat build up. The vac is in a larger space and generates less heat than my air compressor – check out that project as it has a similar set up.

You can see what I’m talking about in the picture below

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The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#3 posted 08-09-2015 07:22 PM

After posting above I thought about your question some more. My thoughts on the fan were originally for heat exhaust. I built this right after my compressor cabinet so heat exhaust was on my mind. What your asking is does the 110 CFM fan help exhaust air pressure the vac generates inside the cabinet when it’s rated over 300 CFM…...honestly, I had not thought of that so great question. I suspect the fan foes not help with that. So far, I’ve not had any issues but I think I may put another chase in the back right corner to help with the vac air pressure exhaust but without a fan.

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2595 days


#4 posted 08-09-2015 10:53 PM

Thanks for the reply – I would guess that the fan helps, but maybe not as much as possible. On the other hand as I think about it, if you just took the fan off and had the chase the air would exhaust all on it’s own. That would mean adding a fan is an improvement.

Is there a way for the air to escape the plastic bin? Hope you don’t mind the questions, but I find the concept interesting…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#5 posted 08-10-2015 12:26 AM

Plastic bin – do you mean the shop vac canister? The air just flows right through that. If you are talking about the slide out tray where the dust is collected, then no, air does not leak out of that or the Dust Deputy. Feel free to ask questions, hopefully I learn something.

Scott

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

2896 posts in 2487 days


#6 posted 08-10-2015 09:19 AM

Great idea and build. Something we can all use I’m sure. I have had vac’s in boxes before and didn’t know it would get so hot in there even with holes drilled into the cabinet…until I burnt up a vac. Perhaps leaving the back of the cabinet off where the shop vac sets. Instead of the back, run a couple 1×4” across the back to hold everything together. This way the back would be solid but also allow the heat to excape better

-- Larry in Hawaii,

View The2CarGarageShop's profile

The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#7 posted 08-10-2015 01:55 PM

Thanks Larry, I looked at a lot of vac cabinets while trying to come up with this one. None of them had a dust deputy/cyclone hooked up to them. I think part of the over heating issue with those is that the filter would get clogged/was not cleaned out as frequently as needed. A clogged filter stresses the motor by itself but throw it in a cabinet with minimal heat exhaust and you get a dead motor. Some had fans but a lot did not. A lot of older computer fans were in the range of 65 CFM, this one is 110 CFM. I also think the remote control On/off switch makes a big difference in that I can turn the vac off easily but the fan still runs. I did a bunch of cuts on my table saw yesterday and I’d turn the vac on, then the saw and make my cut. Turn the saw off and then turn the vac off when the blade stopped ( I just arbitraily decided that was long enough to suck out the last of the dust). As I measured the next cut, the fan was still running exhausting the heat. I’ll have to monitor things as time goes by but so far so good. I think having the cyclone in front of the vac, keeping the filter clean, havcing the exhaust fan and the remote on/off switch will make a lot of difference

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2595 days


#8 posted 08-10-2015 02:19 PM

I was referring to the blue bin with the gray lid…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View The2CarGarageShop's profile

The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#9 posted 08-10-2015 03:52 PM

Steve – that is the shop vac – you can see it better in one of the other photos. So yes, air just runs right through it.

Scott

View DadoDog's profile

DadoDog

7 posts in 642 days


#10 posted 08-11-2015 12:10 AM

Impressive. I like the fact that this vac/cyclone cart does double duty as a work surface, even though the footprint is larger than the vertical, “stacked” designs I’ve considered. Bonus points also for not having to worry about supporting a wobbly Dust Deputy. Plus, you’ve reduced the noise of a screaming shop vac. One question I have is about the dust collection chamber… Instead of a close-tolerance inner box, do you suppose an ordinary lightweight bin would do, provided that the top edge had weatherstripping on it to help contain the dust? Also, may I ask if the hinged door for that compartment is a air-tight fit, and if so how did you achieve that?

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2595 days


#11 posted 08-11-2015 01:39 AM

Got it -Thanks!!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View The2CarGarageShop's profile

The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#12 posted 08-11-2015 02:06 AM

You could use anything to collect the dust. I was trying to maximize the dust bin capacity. I think I have 1/16 clearance on either side so keeping the dust in the bin is more important. To me, it’s the same concept as the chamfer on the bottom of the fence on a cross cut sled – a small amount of dust can cause a significant interference. A smaller size bin should not be affected by dust getting outside it into the chamber. I don’t think the weather stripping would be needed. The drawer I made was not difficult. I used scrap would and rabbets for the joints. The chamber is air tight. The four sides to the front of the chamber are all even. The door is flat. I clamped the door in place when I put the hinge on to make sure it was tight. The latch on top Is adjustable so it is very tight. I had purchased a strip of “gasket” material to put around the edge but ended up not needing it. I used rabbets and dados to put this together so the joints are solid and air tight. That chamber needs to be air tight or it won’t work. I did do a test run part way through the build to see if it was worth going on – I was pleasantly surprised. See photo below

Hope this helps and thanks for the kind comments. Feel free to ask other questions. I did take a lot of photos of the build process.

View DadoDog's profile

DadoDog

7 posts in 642 days


#13 posted 08-12-2015 02:23 AM

Can you tell me where you picked up the hardware, i.e, the adjustable clamps used to secure the dust chamber door? And do you happen to know what those things are called?

Thanks. Again, nice design. I’m predicting this will catch on with those who get tired of trying to secure buckets and fumbling with stubborn bucket lids.

View The2CarGarageShop's profile

The2CarGarageShop

18 posts in 878 days


#14 posted 08-12-2015 02:26 AM

Here’s what I used – from Amazon

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