LumberJocks

Simple shop stool

  • Advertise with us
Project by Dorje posted 06-22-2007 07:06 AM 2821 views 9 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

We all tire at the bench and need to have a stool that is “just right” for our body size and all that…so this is what I came up with. It’s recycled from a scrappy old fir bookcase. It even has the pith running through the middle of the seat! Typically a real “no-no,” but I kind of liked it on this!

I shaped the seat and the legs with spokeshaves and joined it all up with through mortise and tenons, wedged with walnut. Didn’t bother to sand this one – didn’t want to waste the time on it! Just put a couple coats of oil and called it good.

What I didn’t do, but should’ve…I didn’t use compound angles but rather splayed the legs only out in one direction. I would have preferred the compound aesthetically, but not sure that it was necessary on this piece. It’s certainly as sturdy as I wanted it to be and as it needs to be. However, I haven’t built any chairs – yet. And, I haven’t done much reading on the subject either, so if you all would give me some feedback on what you know about the use of angles for legs and what have you, I would appreciate that! Thanks!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA





19 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2750 days


#1 posted 06-22-2007 07:09 AM

Very charming. It invites you to sit on it.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View hermanv's profile

hermanv

17 posts in 2675 days


#2 posted 06-22-2007 07:33 AM

Perhaps you could add as an entry to the fine woodworking contest hosted by Lumberjocks. Jointery looks like its no glue or fasteners.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2649 days


#3 posted 06-22-2007 08:02 AM

oh, there’s glue in them there joints!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View hermanv's profile

hermanv

17 posts in 2675 days


#4 posted 06-22-2007 08:03 AM

Suppose you don’t want to be falling on your

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2739 days


#5 posted 06-22-2007 09:04 AM

Very nice…beautiful in it’s simplicity.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2963 days


#6 posted 06-22-2007 03:15 PM

It looks nice. I don’t know if I could have used that piece with the knot in the center for a seat. It looks like it is just waiting to split at any moment. I like the through tenons and wedged rungs.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2689 days


#7 posted 06-22-2007 03:20 PM

Dorje, how are the through mortises cut. Did you taper them to take the wedge? Can you talk a little about the joinery?

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View TreeBones's profile

TreeBones

1823 posts in 2676 days


#8 posted 06-22-2007 04:09 PM

Maybe I’m doing something wrong cause I never have a chance to sit down at my work bench. Nice stool.

-- Ron, Twain Harte, Ca. Portable on site Sawmill Service http://westcoastlands.net/Sawmill.html http://westcoastlands.net/SawBucks2/phpBB3 http://www.portablesawmill.info

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2649 days


#9 posted 06-22-2007 04:19 PM

Mot – no tapers – didn’t use any “advanced” techniques here. Just cut the kerfs with a backsaw and wedged them. The round mortises are just drilled out; the mortises in the seat I chopped out by hand.

Ron – you should try it sometime! Ha! I sit for a lot of chopping and paring tasks. I also stand quite a bit!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2649 days


#10 posted 06-22-2007 04:21 PM

oscorner – that board’s been around for 25-30 years – most of it’s life outside. Not too worried about a split on this one!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2899 days


#11 posted 06-22-2007 04:49 PM

Very nice stool, very cool, just love the finish and texture, jockmike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2814 days


#12 posted 06-22-2007 05:09 PM

Looks like a comfortable seat to me! A nice job .

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2739 days


#13 posted 06-22-2007 09:19 PM

Did you intentionally leave your construction marks on the seat to save time? I actually like it as a design element…especially considering what the stool is to be used for. It enhances the simplicity by showing disregard for a polished finish, and yet also highlights the technical craftsmanship of the joints.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Karson's profile

Karson

34876 posts in 3053 days


#14 posted 06-22-2007 09:45 PM

Very comfortable looking stool. I made a second workbench that 24” off the floor so that I can sit on a chair when I’m working on it.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2649 days


#15 posted 06-23-2007 12:19 AM

Thanks for all the great comments!

Bob- I did leave the cutting gauge lines to save time and just ‘cause it was a rough piece from beginning to end. Also, the tenons on the top of the seat are just a hair proud and chamfered. I would have had to plane those down to remove the marks…

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase