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Small Bud Vase "Rose Fist"

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Project by Mark Wilson posted 07-17-2015 08:24 AM 800 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

What I call a Rose Fist is that part of a Rose Tree where the trunk ends and the branches begin. I planted this Rose Tree in my yard a number of years ago, and, in the last year or so, it died. (I know, weird. You can’t kill a Rose around here if you try – extremely hardy species.) Anyhow, it died, and I was removing it from said yard, from the top down, when I notice this gnarly “fist”. I separated it from the trunk, and it sat around for a while.
What are you gonna do with that, besides move it out of the way every time you step on it? Well, I shall examine it to see if there’s any way to mount it.
What say you flatten enough of one end to get at least three faceplate screws into it?
Okay.
Under constant concern over just how firmly attached any of this chunk of compacted material was, I turned a simple vase shape. Then, I wanted to open it up just enough to get a plastic tube-type container in to hold water for a bud. I didn’t measure the container That’s 5/8”, mebees 9/16”, says Mr. Smartypants.

I drilled it out carefully with a 5/8” Forstner. It doesn’t fit.
So, Sillyhead, stick a tool in there and open it up til it does.

While I’m following his advice, I start seeing some plate movement in the vicinity of that huge fissure, visible in photos 1 & 5. I stop immediately, shake my head at him, and begin sanding and polishing (and closing my ears to any more suggestions).

I slathered the thing, inside and out, with more shellac than I can remember. Polished up, it became something unlike anything else ever.

I hope I can find more “Rose Fists”.

-- Mark





11 comments so far

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1753 posts in 528 days


#1 posted 07-17-2015 08:29 AM

After thoroughly shellacking this thing with shellac (really gave it what-for, I did), I took it in the house to see if it’d hold water. It didn’t.

-- Mark

View peteg's profile

peteg

3857 posts in 2288 days


#2 posted 07-17-2015 08:36 AM

love the photo path Mark, a real gnarly old piece kind of fitting for an old prickly Rose, great job in getting there, but I can understand the water having a laugh at your attempt agin it :)
cheers
Pete

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View BobWemm's profile

BobWemm

1812 posts in 1391 days


#3 posted 07-17-2015 08:55 AM

You can never tell what is under the mass of bark and dirt.
A beautiful piece of wood.
I saw a pen made from the root section of a “Rosemary” garden plant. That was spectacular.
Keep having fun with these lumps.

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1753 posts in 528 days


#4 posted 07-17-2015 09:04 AM

Bob, if I can find more of these “lumps”, I will go to town.
Thanks, Peteg. Another Aussie. Three notches on my Buddy Belt.

-- Mark

View Bob Collins's profile

Bob Collins

2320 posts in 3148 days


#5 posted 07-18-2015 12:10 AM

That came up very nicely Mark, once the bark is off the mystery begins. That doesn’t hold water either.

-- Bob C, Australia. I love sharing as long as it is not my tools

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1753 posts in 528 days


#6 posted 07-18-2015 06:47 AM

Thanks, Bob. This is one of my favorite things. And, certainly, the most out-there.

-- Mark

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21564 posts in 3316 days


#7 posted 07-19-2015 03:44 AM

Very attractive piece of wood.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1753 posts in 528 days


#8 posted 07-19-2015 05:50 AM

A dead piece of wood that’s just full of life.

-- Mark

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1417 days


#9 posted 10-04-2015 08:54 PM

Missed this when you first posted it, must have been busy that day. Great job! Amazing what a rose bush (or tree) can do. We have the opposite problem around here – hard to keep the rose bushes alive with our cold winters and humid summers. Which is why I love my Rugosa Rose so much, not only is it cold tolerant, pest resistant, and immune to mildew, and it thrives close to my Walnut Trees (which tend to poison the soil for other plants) – the wood makes beautiful sturdy canes. Of course it takes YEARS for the wood to get big enough for that but 1 is done and three more are on the drying rack, so life is good.

Take care and good luck with future rose wood projects.

John

-- Leafherder

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1753 posts in 528 days


#10 posted 10-04-2015 10:44 PM

I didn’t know that about Walnut. Roses are extremely hardy (hearty?) in most places, and grow wild in the Frozen North – MT, ND, WY. I’m really surprised that the cold in OH kills them. Oh. They grow wild in the Mojave Desert, also. Naturally, they’re not of the Floribunda Family, but, Roses nonetheless. And, of course, there’s the famous Rose of Texas, which, given the size of the state, has weather extremes that do hold a candle to most other places. How about Rose Trees in OH. Do you have those? If you do, and, if they die, what do I have to do to get you to send me some of the “Fists”, like that from which I made this piece? The “Fist”, as I said in the description, is the point where the trunk branches out. As for future Rose projects, there won’t be any, unless I can find dead Roses.
Thanks for the word. This really is one of my favorite creations. Because it’s so doggone unique.

-- Mark

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1417 days


#11 posted 10-05-2015 10:37 PM

Yes we have hardy wild roses around here – tiny blooms, huge thorns – commonly called briars (as in Briar Rose from the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale) or dog rose. But most people plant the floribunda, hybrid tea types that are not suited to our climate and require special rose cones of mulch to survive the winter. Most are grafted on to hardier root stocks so when the cold kills off the tender floribunda top the plant sprouts from the roots but reverts to the species stock which is not what was planted so it gets dug up and thrown out. Tree varieties are not common around here because the top parts die too easily – although my Rugosa is probably taller than most tree roses at about 6 feet tall, but it is definitely a shrub variety. Recently the “knockout Roses” have gained popularity as landscape plants because of their resistance to cold but those are low growing shrubs. Rose root balls I might be able to get, but not until Spring/Summer when folks are digging out the old plants that died during the winter.

And yes you can google search “walnut toxicity” to learn all about how walnut trees do not play well with others.

-- Leafherder

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