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Drunken Cutting Board Revisited

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Project by Peter Brown posted 07-01-2015 02:59 PM 3655 views 34 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Drunken Cutting Board Revisited
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Drunken Cutting Boards

This is my first cutting board. An interesting pattern emerges from the flowing “S” shape and works really well with the high contrast of maple and walnut. I saw this post on here from user Poroskywood in 2009. It’s taken me this long to give it go…

Taking Stock Of Your Stock

The process begins with two board that are the same thickness. In this case my lumber was 7/8 of an inch thick. I used Maple and Walnut because they are easily available to me and they contrast well with each other.

Dimensioning Lumber

I then cut them to 9” in width and 14” in length. Both boards being the same dimensions is key to this project turning out.

Double Stick Tape

The two boards are joined with double stick tape and taken over to the band saw. Double stick tape is a shop staple. I use this stuff for everything!

The First Of A Series Of S Cuts

I just cut an “S” shape at the band saw and repeated the process 5 times. I tried to make them similar but not precise. A free form cut is sorta of what gives this project it’s charm! Who ever heard of drunken precision?

Cleanup

There were some tool marks from the band saw, I lightly sanded them off at the drum sander. What you don’t want to do is change the shape of the curve and ruin the
mating of the two pieces.

Alternate The Pieces

Next, you can alternate each piece and glue up the boards with a cool wavy look. The original design called for 1/8 cherry strips between the waves (you can see them in the picture). That didn’t work out well for me. No, I don’t want to talk about it…

Glue Up #1

Alternate the pieces, add glue and apply clamping pressure. I ended up going with a couple of pipe clamps, but that was after a few false starts. I don’t have a picture because I was in full panic mode at that point. One one of the reasons this project takes so long is that there are 3 separate glue ups. Otherwise it’s pretty simple.

MOAR DOUBLE STICK TAPE!

After the glue dries pass each board through the planer and get two parallel surfaces for joining together again with double stick tape.

A Second Series Of S Cut

This time I swapped out blades in my band saw in hopes of making the process better. It wasn’t a grand idea and I should have stuck with the first blade (3/16 4tpi) Look at those burn marks. LOOK AT THEM!

Glue Up #2

Now, we alternate the boards again and glue up for a second time. Once dried you can sand them flat or use your thickness sander. I used the planer, but it can chip out some of the cross grain. Oh I need a thickness sander in the shop!

Who’s Getting Tired Of Glue Ups?!

Now we glue up for a THIRD time. This makes for a nice heavy cutting board about 1 1/2” thick. Of course this is not required. You could just add some rubber feet and end up with two great looking cutting boards. That was my original plan, but I decided it needed more weight to it.

Sanding & Handholds

I routed two hand holds with a 1/2 rabbeting bit and rounded the corners on the disk sander. Then it’s on to the sanding. I sanded to 220 grit. Take your time and get the surface nice and smooth!

Finish

I used mineral oil. Which is both extremely cheap and easy. Much like myself…

The Original Post In 2009 I made a few changes from the original, but I would be remiss not to link to the post were I first saw this project back in 2009: http://lumberjocks.com/poroskywood/blog/10833 A great idea Poroskywood!

-- Peter Brown - Collector of WD-40 and wood splinters





13 comments so far

View Derek Oliver's profile

Derek Oliver

162 posts in 1613 days


#1 posted 07-01-2015 04:22 PM

You could just as easily hung this on a wall as art. Great job. By chance was this some of the walnut you got off the big pile?

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9120 posts in 2330 days


#2 posted 07-01-2015 05:02 PM

My favourite. Awesome work, perfect presentation, very educational.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Peter Brown's profile

Peter Brown

196 posts in 1139 days


#3 posted 07-01-2015 05:10 PM


You could just as easily hung this on a wall as art. Great job. By chance was this some of the walnut you got off the big pile?

- Derek Oliver

Thanks! Not yet, but I did plane a piece down! https://instagram.com/p/4ffTxIHOmc


My favourite. Awesome work, perfect presentation, very educational.

- majuvla


Thanks!!

-- Peter Brown - Collector of WD-40 and wood splinters

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

376 posts in 1076 days


#4 posted 07-01-2015 09:11 PM

Very nice job. I finally got around to making a few of these myself this year. Fun project and making two at a time is a bonus.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View SteveGaskins's profile

SteveGaskins

646 posts in 2049 days


#5 posted 07-01-2015 10:17 PM

Very nice. I’ve made these before and the are fun to make.

-- Steve, South Carolina, http://www.finewoodworkingofsc.com

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

618 posts in 2826 days


#6 posted 07-02-2015 03:29 PM

2009? Has it been that long?.. lol Nice write up bro! Good fun.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View Peter Brown's profile

Peter Brown

196 posts in 1139 days


#7 posted 07-02-2015 04:16 PM



2009? Has it been that long?.. lol Nice write up bro! Good fun.

- poroskywood

Thanks for the excellent tutorial! I just wish I’d had more luck with my cherry strips… :)

-- Peter Brown - Collector of WD-40 and wood splinters

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3551 posts in 2023 days


#8 posted 07-02-2015 04:47 PM

Peter

I really like what you done. Do you have any plans or templates that I can get from you?

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

618 posts in 2826 days


#9 posted 07-02-2015 05:45 PM

Thin strips and subtle curves go a long way.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

376 posts in 1076 days


#10 posted 07-02-2015 08:59 PM



Peter

I really like what you done. Do you have any plans or templates that I can get from you?

- Arlin Eastman

Don’t really need a template. The idea is to make sweeping cuts. Make sure you check out the two different types. One uses sweeping lines the other uses a chaotic pattern. The tough part for me was getting 10” wide stock I liked.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

3800 posts in 3056 days


#11 posted 07-03-2015 08:43 PM

sweet

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

View abie's profile

abie

818 posts in 3233 days


#12 posted 10-19-2015 03:35 PM

Nice!!
I’ve made several now and the hard part is to get both sides to align so that the pattern wraps around on both sides.

To make the joints look tight, I sand and glue the slight cracks in the glue . Sanding after placing glue in the slight cracks makes to lines disappear.

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.

View  woodshaver (Tony)  's profile

woodshaver (Tony)

4010 posts in 2815 days


#13 posted 11-09-2015 12:29 PM

A great looking board and equally great tutorial! Thanks for sharing!

-- Tony C UAW, St Augustine FL, My high school shop teacher said "You can do it"... Now I can't stop!

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