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Dyed oak plate with FIMO feature ring

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Project by Yuval Eitan posted 06-28-2015 09:59 AM 1071 views 2 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Dyed oak plate with FIMO feature ring

An experimental piece, in more than one aspect

I turned a plate from a leftover piece of oak that a friend found in a carpentry workshop dumpster.
I turned two recesses, one in the rim, another round the center of the piece, and it was haded over to a FIMO (polymeric clay) artist, to decorate at her will.
I found the oak & fimo plate somewhat plane, and started to go wild on it.
Some red fabric dye that was left, and some black India ink I “borrowed” from work.
After sealing with shellack, I filled the pores with some black ink to accentuate them (sea close-ups).
The whole thing was finnished with orange shellac.

People who saw this were controversial in what it made them feel. Some liked, other not so much. One outdid nit, saying it reminds him of the melamine plates from the 1970’s…. /-;

Feel free to criticze!
Cheers,
Yuval

-- Knowlege is just like love - it never dilutes, only grows! Sharing it with others just strengthens it





12 comments so far

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 642 days


#1 posted 06-28-2015 11:44 AM

I love the flower decorations along the edge.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View Eli Adamit's profile

Eli Adamit

660 posts in 2755 days


#2 posted 06-28-2015 11:47 AM

Very nice, I like the composition with the two materials. Each material flatters to the other one.

-- Eli Adamit, Israel

View Yuval Eitan's profile

Yuval Eitan

114 posts in 793 days


#3 posted 06-28-2015 12:44 PM

Thank you WoodNSawdust,
Thank you Eli (for this favorite as well as the others…)
Yuval

-- Knowlege is just like love - it never dilutes, only grows! Sharing it with others just strengthens it

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1418 days


#4 posted 06-28-2015 12:59 PM

Great job and a great example what can happen when different people work together. Each person involved saw the potential for beauty and added their skill to produce the final result. Thank you for posting.

-- Leafherder

View Yuval Eitan's profile

Yuval Eitan

114 posts in 793 days


#5 posted 06-28-2015 01:18 PM

Thank you WoodNSawdust,
Thank you Eli (for this favorite as well as the others…)
and thank you Leafherder for these beautiful words, by which I try to live!
Yuval

-- Knowlege is just like love - it never dilutes, only grows! Sharing it with others just strengthens it

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2800 days


#6 posted 06-28-2015 06:09 PM

Looks very nice to me Yuval. I like the idea of collaborating with others on projects. A nice creative process that benefits all the participants. I never ask for criticism because I know it will be difficult to find anyone more critical of my work than anyone else. That is probably true of most others too. Besides, one man’s gold is another’s garbage. The technical part is maybe a little different because we can all improve our woodworking skills and there are many very highly skilled people on this site to learn from.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dreggy's profile

Dreggy

60 posts in 1070 days


#7 posted 06-28-2015 08:03 PM

I like! I always like pieces that are so original. The FIMO addition makes this quite a unique piece. You guys should do a few more collaborations.

-- No matter how many mistakes you make or how slow your progress, you're still way ahead of everyone who isn't trying.

View Yuval Eitan's profile

Yuval Eitan

114 posts in 793 days


#8 posted 06-28-2015 08:53 PM

Thank you Scandimarican Mike. The way I see it, It isn’t how much one criticizes ones own work relative to others, but the perspective he sees it. When I ask for criticism, it isn’t necessarily what good or bad about a piece. What I hope to get is new different angles, ideas, suggestions, different view on aesthetics, etc. Technical tips are always welcome – I consider myself the eternal pupil.

Thank you Dreggy. Fact is, we did make some more collaborative pieces, alas, the fimo cracked, or we were not as happy with them as with this one. I find it resembles old chinaware, other see it as plain defective. Hold on, let me see if I have pics somewhere…

see the cracks?

-- Knowlege is just like love - it never dilutes, only grows! Sharing it with others just strengthens it

View BobWemm's profile

BobWemm

1814 posts in 1392 days


#9 posted 06-29-2015 06:00 AM

Yuval, I absolutely love the concept, but the only problem I see is that the Polymer Clay cannot expand and contract with the wood movement over time. Otherwise a magic idea.
Thank you for sharing.

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

View Yuval Eitan's profile

Yuval Eitan

114 posts in 793 days


#10 posted 06-29-2015 08:39 AM


...the only problem I see is that the Polymer Clay cannot expand and contract with the wood movement over time…

Gdday Bob!
GOOD POINT!!
Indeed, I have pondered the expantion and contraction issue, on two levels: short term and long.
After the polymeric clay is applied to the wood, the “hybrid” piece undergoes baking in the oven, at ~100degC (~212degF), to cure the polymer. It is this step that I was most concerned about. On some pieces, where my collaborator applied an undercout of glue, and/or over-stretched the clay, cracking of the clay was a problem. Otherwise it went pretty well.
Althogh cured, FIMO does have some inherent elasticity. That, along with a fair amount of shellac as a finish, minimizes the risk of future cracking (I realise shellac is poor as a tight moisture sealant). This piece has survived only one majour seasonal transition, so I guess I’ll be wiser in a couple of years…
I assume that a well seasoned, dry stable wood is preferable. Oak, cypress, avocado, ucalyptus, ficus – all survived the baking step well. The oak I got as a leftover from a woodworking shop (probably kiln dried), the rest I gathered over time as branches or trunks, and have been drying at my place for at least a year, plus the turned pieces were pre baked to assure dryness and stability.

Thanks for the interest and input, mate!

Yuval
ps. Just over a decade ago, while touring in Aussiland with my wife, we neglected the west. Promise to rectify next time… ;-}

-- Knowlege is just like love - it never dilutes, only grows! Sharing it with others just strengthens it

View Dreggy's profile

Dreggy

60 posts in 1070 days


#11 posted 06-29-2015 03:45 PM

Yuval, thanks for the additional pics & way to go, Daily Top 3! I had some questions, but I got them answered in your last post. I see some experimenting in my future.

-- No matter how many mistakes you make or how slow your progress, you're still way ahead of everyone who isn't trying.

View Yuval Eitan's profile

Yuval Eitan

114 posts in 793 days


#12 posted 06-30-2015 09:13 AM

Dreggy, glad I (pre)answered your questions, and thank you very much for the complement on the top daily 3.
Yuval

-- Knowlege is just like love - it never dilutes, only grows! Sharing it with others just strengthens it

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