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Laminate Floor Workbench Top

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Project by edwood1975 posted 06-17-2015 06:38 PM 2021 views 3 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

After a year of heavy project traffic I decided to put a new cover on my workbench and I saw a lot of ideas online but one hit me as the best solution !!! Laminate floor.

I used an oak laminate with board dimensions of 5”x 50” and 7mm thick .. It was one of them boards that has a click and go system so no glue..

I laid the flooring out on the table to decide what was the best way to fit them to the table and screwed the outter perimeter and I’ll finally put a trim around the outside .

It took about 90 minutes and the beuty of it is if I need to replace a board I just have to remove the board and replace no fuss, no glue and it was a cheap way to do this only $18 for this project..

Hope you like

-- Ed





12 comments so far

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1889 days


#1 posted 06-17-2015 08:22 PM

Necessity is the mother of invention… way to go.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5221 posts in 1505 days


#2 posted 06-17-2015 08:56 PM

This is a great way to resurface your bench top quickly and on the cheap. I have done this also on my assembly bench, and never regret it.
Looks great.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1917 posts in 1777 days


#3 posted 06-17-2015 10:44 PM

Looks like a good way to resurface … In 1995 I built a workbench from (I think) Wood Magazine, that had a replaceable hard board (Masonite) top. after all these years the original top is still serviceable … I hope that your top lasts that long.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Robsshop's profile

Robsshop

899 posts in 2437 days


#4 posted 06-18-2015 02:13 AM

Very nice looking up grade and the positives of the flooring are worth considering. Does the slick surface pose any problems when doing any hand work and if so do you think that taking down the finish some might help?

-- Rob,Gaithersburg,MD,One mans trash is another mans wood shop treasure ! ;-)

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2543 days


#5 posted 06-18-2015 01:24 PM

I may have to consider that on my table saw run out table. I use polyurethaned MDF now, but the flooring is so much harder and smoother. i think it is worth a try.

-- Chris K

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

111 posts in 1196 days


#6 posted 06-18-2015 03:19 PM

Please keep us updated on how this works out for you in the long run (or maybe doubleDD could chime in). I am planning a bench build myself, and I like this idea better than the hardboard top, however, I have two concerns:

- Most laminate flooring instructions say to leave a gap around the perimeter to allow for expansion with the seasons. I’m curious to see if screwing around the perimeter will cause either gaps or buckles in the flooring over a couple year’s time.

- Is it too slick? Do projects slide around on you unexpectedly? This is not a deal breaker for me as I plan on having dog holes, so I can just make some stops if needed. But I’m just curious.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 638 days


#7 posted 06-18-2015 03:22 PM

I will have to keep your idea in mind for the next time I have to resurface one of my tables.

Please keep us advised as to how it holds up.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View DRSWoody's profile

DRSWoody

44 posts in 841 days


#8 posted 06-18-2015 05:59 PM

I once made a bench top out of an 8” section of bowling lane. 3” of solid maple on edge tougue and grouved together and 24” wide. Ultra durable and would never wear out but eaqually as heavy as it was durable. I had to take it off the heavy duty legs every time I moved. After about 2 or three moves I left it in one of my shops somewhere 20 or so years ago. Someone is probably still using it.

-- R. Smith Central Iowa

View Roger's profile

Roger

19867 posts in 2266 days


#9 posted 06-20-2015 04:39 PM

I would think this will hold up quite a while. Nice

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1917 posts in 1777 days


#10 posted 06-21-2015 12:01 AM

Robsshop and others,

You are concerned about the top being too slick? ... Think Router matt. I wear out several in a years time, I use them for sanding small projects to illuminate the scratches from the bench top.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View MikeSpanky's profile

MikeSpanky

177 posts in 825 days


#11 posted 06-24-2015 03:08 AM

I may have to give your idea a go. Was thinking Formica but the idea of scratching and scuffing it along with glue drippings just didn’t make sense when I considered the cost. This makes good sense.

-- There's no crying in woodworking. Just measure and cut again.

View edwood1975's profile

edwood1975

492 posts in 805 days


#12 posted 07-06-2015 03:11 PM



Please keep us updated on how this works out for you in the long run (or maybe doubleDD could chime in). I am planning a bench build myself, and I like this idea better than the hardboard top, however, I have two concerns:

- Most laminate flooring instructions say to leave a gap around the perimeter to allow for expansion with the seasons. I m curious to see if screwing around the perimeter will cause either gaps or buckles in the flooring over a couple year s time.

- Is it too slick? Do projects slide around on you unexpectedly? This is not a deal breaker for me as I plan on having dog holes, so I can just make some stops if needed. But I m just curious.

- Tony1212


Hi Tony.. After using the workbench for the last couple of weeks and it’s not too slick but it is dulling after some projects it’s not as slick as it was

-- Ed

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