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Walnut and Spalted Oak Bombe Chest

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Project by lumberjacques posted 1964 days ago 2253 views 10 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, it’s sorta finished. I have not put the hinges on yet. Excuse the sawdust…..





14 comments so far

View pommy's profile

pommy

1697 posts in 2327 days


#1 posted 1964 days ago

That is stunning mate please do a blog on how to make this thank you very much for sharing

Andy

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

View lumberjacques's profile

lumberjacques

71 posts in 1984 days


#2 posted 1964 days ago

Before I show how, I need to ask this question: Because this procedure can be somewhat tricky(and dangerous), what will be my liability if someone tries this and gets hurt? Up here in Canada, I am constantly hearing horror stories about people suing people…..

p.s. Am I to take it that you are from Australia? My daughter will be going there in a few weeks to teach skiing during her summer break (she is last year student at McGill University).

View lumberjacques's profile

lumberjacques

71 posts in 1984 days


#3 posted 1964 days ago

Before I show how, I need to ask this question: Because this procedure can be somewhat tricky(and dangerous), what will be my liability if someone tries this and gets hurt? Up here in Canada, I am constantly hearing horror stories about people suing people…..

p.s. Am I to take it that you are from Australia? My daughter will be going there in a few weeks to teach skiing during her summer break (she is last year student at McGill University).

View Spoontaneous's profile

Spoontaneous

1309 posts in 1966 days


#4 posted 1964 days ago

Very good piece and I love the grain on the top panel… it makes the inside look cool in the open view.

-- I just got done cutting three boards and all four of them were too short. (true story)

View woodworm's profile

woodworm

14125 posts in 2227 days


#5 posted 1964 days ago

Beautiful piece from beautiful wood.

-- masrol, kuala lumpur, MY.

View Lou's profile

Lou

178 posts in 2718 days


#6 posted 1964 days ago

wow. very pretty wood! great work.

-- "What one can make with good tools is limited only by one's talent" (lucius-hill@comcast.net)

View Vince's profile

Vince

955 posts in 2065 days


#7 posted 1964 days ago

Use a disclaimer at the beginning and the end of the tutorial.
Your work is beautiful.

-- Vince

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1264 posts in 2378 days


#8 posted 1963 days ago

I like this one a lot. That spalted oak and walnut go well together.

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

View boxman's profile

boxman

104 posts in 2068 days


#9 posted 1952 days ago

the spalted wood always looks great,thanks for posting

-- john, Moose Jaw, Sask, j.soika@shaw.ca

View Karson's profile

Karson

34870 posts in 3037 days


#10 posted 1897 days ago

A beautiful box. Nice job.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2100 days


#11 posted 1792 days ago

i’d be interested to know how you sculpted those sides.

View lumberjacques's profile

lumberjacques

71 posts in 1984 days


#12 posted 1791 days ago

hiya aaron

it is actually extremely simple, but very dangerous if not done with great precaution. with the “disclaimer” part over with, here goes:

a) make box carcass, using the 4 planks of desired wood with the four corners of different wood. b) on tablesaw, clamp two “rails” of wood, one on each side of the blade, at an angle. the angle you choose will dictate the width of the “groove”. the smaller the angle, the narrower the groove. the rails must be the exact width of the finished carcass, but must allow the carcass to be drawn smoothly through them. c) bring up your blade (approx 1/8” at a pass) and pull the first side of the carcass over it CAREFULLY. then repeat for three other sides. keep doing this until the desired depth is reached. d) sanding can be easily accomplished by wrapping a piece of sandpaper around a cylinder of styrofoam (which you can turn on a lathe to the exact size of your “channel”), so that no gouges or ridges are left on the surface. e) do not try this at the end of the day, when you are hungry, tired, or irritated about something. this can be VERY DANGEROUS. do not be in a hurry to see the results. TAKE YOUR TIME.

ok, now that i have finished with a closing disclaimer, the entire operation is actually, quite easy. i have found that a “channel” narrower than a couple of inches can better be made with a router. i have also found that doing this on a cheap saw is not the best of ideas, as the blade can “wobble”, and the results can easily be observed.
finally, when you choose the method of assembling your carcass, i have also experienced that (gggrrrrr….) it is very important to consider the humidity factor of the final “resting place” for the box, as, when the seasons change…., well, you know…

p.s. choose the grains carefully for the end blocks (as you would for a cabriolet leg), as this will have a most dramatic effect on the finished product. another real nice effect is putting in an extremely thin slice of an offsetting colored wood—ebony, for instance—between the planks and blocks as they will “follow the curve” of the end block, adding greatly to the “wow” factor.

lumberjacques

www.woodwideweb.ca

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2100 days


#13 posted 1791 days ago

ah! so like cove molding! i am a bit scared to do this on my ts just yet – and there is some wobble which would make things nasty, as you say. great idea. you just use squared edges and the sculpting of the outside makes it look like you did some really fancy edge work on oak-walnut joinery (not to diminish the difficulty of nice miters)! impressive. i’ll have to remember this for when my skills and tools improve. thanks!

View thiswoodshop's profile

thiswoodshop

140 posts in 1193 days


#14 posted 1190 days ago

Very nice peace, what brand of wood did you use?

-- Mo... For safety is not a gadget but a state of mind. ~ "Eleanor Everet" - www.thiswoodshop.com

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