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Project by lumberjacques posted 04-13-2009 08:10 PM 1220 views 6 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made from spalted Oak and Padouk





11 comments so far

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2222 days


#1 posted 04-13-2009 08:28 PM

A wonderful grain patten. Nice work!

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View Chris's profile

Chris

338 posts in 2053 days


#2 posted 04-13-2009 10:07 PM

Now that’s a nice box!

-- Chris

View savannah505's profile

savannah505

1708 posts in 2282 days


#3 posted 04-13-2009 11:35 PM

A very beautiful box. Love the wood, and a very nice design.

-- Dan Wiggins

View woodworm's profile

woodworm

14129 posts in 2286 days


#4 posted 04-14-2009 04:49 AM

Very nice box.

-- masrol, kuala lumpur, MY.

View mark76wa's profile

mark76wa

80 posts in 2091 days


#5 posted 04-14-2009 07:14 AM

What is spalted oak? It is a very nice.

Mark

View lumberjacques's profile

lumberjacques

71 posts in 2043 days


#6 posted 04-14-2009 04:22 PM

A very special kind of Oak. When you cut it thin enough, you get “spalt and paper”... (sorry, couldn’t resist that one). Actually, spalting is common to many types of wood. It occurs when certain families of fungus “invade” a tree, most often after it has fallen to the ground and left to rot. The black lines are created when the “battlefronts” of two different families of fungi meet. Different types of fungi cause different coloration, even within the same wood. This is my “reader’s Digest” explanation. You can create your own spalted wood by leaving a section of tree on it’s side in a shady moist area, (right next to a woodpile is an EXCELLENT place, and turn it one quarter turn every few months. You can tell the spalting process has started most often (but not always) by the growth of “mushrooms” on the outside of the log. Or, you can go for a walk in a forest, look for logs that are on the ground which have fungi already growing on them. It is important to stop the spalting process at some point, or the piece of wood will go “punk” (the wood rots to the point where it becomes very soft, losing the wood consistency)on you.

You can get more in depth information at :

http://www.hiltonhandcraft.com/Articles/Spalting_a_Fungus_Amongus.asp

http://www.hawaii.edu/abrp/Technologies/fungus.html

http://www.woodturninglearn.net/articles/spaltedwood.htm

Aren’t you sorry you asked…..??

View rance's profile

rance

4143 posts in 1856 days


#7 posted 02-23-2011 07:43 AM

I’ve seen that log! But you’ve placed it well on the lid. Nice box dude.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Woodbutcher3's profile

Woodbutcher3

364 posts in 1582 days


#8 posted 09-11-2011 01:33 PM

Lumber Jacques – I love that “Spalt and Paper” – you and Rance are going to get along very well. He has the same sense of insanity. Beautiful work! I like the way you set off the sides from the top so they have their own statement. I often wonder how to put a box together like wher the wild grain doesn’t interfer with the other portions of the box. I’ve got a nice tall thick piece of spalted maple waiting in the basement for something. I think I’ve found it.

Look forward to seeing more from you!

-- Rod ~ There's never enough time to finish a project, but there's always time to start another one.

View fisherdoug09's profile

fisherdoug09

86 posts in 1370 days


#9 posted 04-16-2013 02:09 PM

Beautiful boxes, love the spalted wood. I live in Montana and all our trees are soft wood, pines and firs. Envy you guys sometimes that live in areas where hardwood trees grow. My only access to spalted wood is my local supplier and the selection is not very good.

View lumberjacques's profile

lumberjacques

71 posts in 2043 days


#10 posted 04-16-2013 05:09 PM

make your own!!!! very easy—many “recipes” on the internet, but essentially:
1-go to your favorite place where trees grow
2- look for a fallen tree that has mushrooms growing on it
3- scrape away some mushroom and bark; go to the wood. you will see spalting.
4- different species of mushrooms create different types and colors of spalting
5- when you find the spalting you like, scrape off some fungi, moss, and bark. put in a bag and bring home
6- pick the log or piece of lumber you want to spalt
7- put some sawdust into a plastic trash bag. wet it thoroughly
8- mix 3/4 of the stuff you scraped off the tree into the wet sawdust
9- put lumber into bag. make sure its covered with the sawdust mixture.
10- put remaining stuff from forest over the top (like icing on a cake)
11- close bag. put in room temperature(or slightly warmer) area.
12- check every few months. do not let dry out. move lumber around every time you check
13- at some point the spalting will do it’s thing. generally a good sign is when the fungi thrives. don’t be afraid of mixing fungi in the same batch. this is how you will get different colored lines rather than just plain old black. i’ve had red, green, blue, violet, orange for line colors. and when you can get that variety on one piece of wood…..
14- spalting is mold. some folks are allergic to mold. take appropriate precautions.
15- if you live where it doesn’t go below freezing, you can omit the trashbag; just put the whole thing in the corner of the yard, protect from heavy rains and strong sun by erecting a small lean to roof over the pile. turn the lumber/log over (quarter turn each time)every 3-4 months so the the spalting grows well distributed. hose down when it shows signs of drying out.

there are many other ways/tricks/methods. check the ‘net.

lumberjacques

View lumberjacques's profile

lumberjacques

71 posts in 2043 days


#11 posted 04-16-2013 05:11 PM

make your own!!!! very easy—many “recipes” on the internet, but essentially:
1-go to your favorite place where trees grow
2- look for a fallen tree that has mushrooms growing on it
3- scrape away some mushroom and bark; go to the wood. you will see spalting.
4- different species of mushrooms create different types and colors of spalting
5- when you find the spalting you like, scrape off some fungi, moss, and bark. put in a bag and bring home. some of the “punk wood”—(completely rotted)—is a plus as the mold is well established in there.
6- pick the log or piece of lumber you want to spalt
7- put some sawdust into a plastic trash bag. wet it thoroughly
8- mix 3/4 of the stuff you scraped off the tree into the wet sawdust
9- put lumber into bag. make sure its covered with the sawdust mixture.
10- put remaining stuff from forest over the top (like icing on a cake)
11- close bag. put in room temperature(or slightly warmer) area.
12- check every few months. do not let dry out. move lumber around every time you check
13- at some point the spalting will do it’s thing. generally a good sign is when the fungi thrives. don’t be afraid of mixing fungi in the same batch. this is how you will get different colored lines rather than just plain old black. i’ve had red, green, blue, violet, orange for line colors. and when you can get that variety on one piece of wood…..
14- spalting is mold. some folks are allergic to mold. take appropriate precautions.
15- if you live where it doesn’t go below freezing, you can omit the trashbag; just put the whole thing in the corner of the yard, protect from heavy rains and strong sun by erecting a small lean to roof over the pile. turn the lumber/log over (quarter turn each time)every 3-4 months so the the spalting grows well distributed. hose down when it shows signs of drying out.

there are many other ways/tricks/methods. check the ‘net.

spalting is mold. some folks are allergic to mold. take appropriate precautions.
spalting is mold. some folks are allergic to mold. take appropriate precautions.
spalting is mold. some folks are allergic to mold. take appropriate precautions.
spalting is mold. some folks are allergic to mold. take appropriate precautions.

lumberjacques

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