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My kerfmakers

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Project by MrLaughingbrook posted 06-07-2015 06:01 PM 17022 views 23 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My kerfmakers -

I read about this useful jig on LJs and decided on making each dedicated to a blade (or stack) to avoid the complexity of an adjustment.

1. those kerfmakers with three limbs look hard for a first kerfmaker
2. thought if i cut through the throat and dedicated it to a single blade or stack then I could get by with two pieces
3. centered groove in top and bottom pieces
4. glued a protruding rail, spline in the bottom half
4. cut a block off of the top, glue it to the bottom, note pieces are still long
5. shape a recess for the bolt head in the top at the router with stop block at start and finish, several passes to deepen it on a straight bit, moving the fence back a bit for each pass. Drillpress a hole to start a slot (vertical now if you follow this is for the bolt going down to the base), mount the top through drilled hole on straight bit in the router and route to a stop block.
6. drill press hole in bottom, near opposite end from throat to match floor in top, install threaded insert
7. assemble with throat closed tight, bolt tight, and cross cut the ends to flush top and bottom
8. with throat closed, cross cut a dado right on the slot, full depth of top piece,
9. remember which blade made it

I was asked about that one with no kerf.

It is a blank. It will get a kerf in the throat when I have a stack picked for a project. Actually, the first pictured is 1/4 as measured by the Freud dado blades stacked with no spacers, the second is 1/8 as measured by the flat top Freud rip blade, the third (because it was a test cut with an 1/8 crosscut blade that will not be used for dados, can become anything larger with a cut covering both edges) and fourth are blanks.

I’m thinking for ~3/4 dados then I’ll stack blades and chipper to 1/2 and dedicate a kerfmaker. Two overlapping passes at 1/2 should make a nice ~3/4 fit.

Thanks for looking.

-- MrLaughingbrook





13 comments so far

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1632 posts in 2710 days


#1 posted 06-07-2015 06:37 PM

Nice Set of Kerf Makers.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

9158 posts in 3125 days


#2 posted 06-07-2015 06:48 PM

Those are sweet!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View mafe's profile

mafe

11537 posts in 2786 days


#3 posted 06-07-2015 07:01 PM

Cool idea, lovely jigs.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View MrLaughingbrook's profile

MrLaughingbrook

109 posts in 1664 days


#4 posted 06-07-2015 08:06 PM

I feel lucky to have my post noticed by tyvekboy and mafe. tyvekboy invited me to LJs and provided inspiration. mafe I have read all your posts, you rock. Next I’m going to make a copy of your threaded insert install jig!

tyvekboy asked for more details and thought process. I did not take pictures as I went, but here was my thought process and procedure as I remember it.

1. those kerfmakers with three limbs look hard for a first kerfmaker
2. thought if i cut through the throat and dedicated it to a single blade or stack then I could get by with two pieces
3. centered groove in top and bottom pieces
4. glued a protruding rail, spline in the bottom half
4. cut a block off of the top, glue it to the bottom, note pieces are still long
5. shape a recess for the bolt head in the top at the router with stop block at start and finish, several passes to deepen it on a straight bit, moving the fence back a bit for each pass. Drillpress a hole to start a slot, mount top through straight bit on the router and route to stop block.
6. drill press hole in bottom, near opposite end from throat to match floor in top, install threaded insert
7. assemble with throat closed tight, bolt tight, and cross cut the ends to flush top and bottom
8. with throat closed, cross cut a dado right on the slot, full depth of top piece,
9. remember which blade made it

-- MrLaughingbrook

View gsimon's profile

gsimon

1235 posts in 1810 days


#5 posted 06-07-2015 08:35 PM

Nice!

-- Greg Simon

View mafe's profile

mafe

11537 posts in 2786 days


#6 posted 06-07-2015 08:50 PM

You got noticed because you did a wonderful job on these. ;-)
Big smile here.
Thank you for that fine compliment, it is so wonderful how we can inspire each other and new things or versions emerge from this.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View MrLaughingbrook's profile

MrLaughingbrook

109 posts in 1664 days


#7 posted 06-08-2015 09:50 PM

re: using the fence rail for stop v magnet is a range choice for me.

-- MrLaughingbrook

View TheHerm's profile

TheHerm

3 posts in 1303 days


#8 posted 10-11-2015 08:54 PM

OK, now I have a solution I like – yours.

These are so simple you can batch them out and have one for each blade, and a couple blanks ready for the dado stack.

I have now imagined two ways to make them. Build the kerfmaker so the butt ends are even when the jaws are closed. Then:

1) With the jaw closed tight, chuck up the blade you will use and saw right into the meeting point to make a gap that is one kerf wide.

2) Or, chuck up the blade and close the jaw onto it, then tighten the screw. Then head over to the chopsaw and cut the butt end off so it is even.

Thank you so much for posting your design. All other solutions I found took a lot more machining to accomplish…

Herm

P.S. Did my post make sense? Maybe I need to draw a picture…

View MrLaughingbrook's profile

MrLaughingbrook

109 posts in 1664 days


#9 posted 10-11-2015 09:55 PM

Herm,

My initial woodworking coach, teacher, and grandfather is Herman. I do understand your post and appreciate that you see the point of this kerfmaker design. I too want to avoid the complexity of a three piece design and will willingly dedicate a maker to each blade. I still have one uncut and waiting for some requirement for a new dado stack.

-- MrLaughingbrook

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2246 posts in 1345 days


#10 posted 05-01-2017 04:24 PM

Absolutely brilliant design, easy on the eyes too!

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View papadan's profile

papadan

3076 posts in 3065 days


#11 posted 05-01-2017 04:40 PM

I have a question, what is the purpose of a kerfmaker and how do you use it?

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

View MrLaughingbrook's profile

MrLaughingbrook

109 posts in 1664 days


#12 posted 05-01-2017 05:06 PM

papadan,

A kerfmaker is used to position a fence for making a dado slot wider than the blade/stack. Often this is easier than trial cuts and shimming the stack to find a perfect fit.

This style kermaker has a mouth that is exactly the width of the blade/stack. To set it for cutting a dado to receive another piece then close the mouth onto that piece and tighten the thumb screw to lock it in place. Set the fence for the first cut; clamp a block to trap the kermaker tightly in place (see my comment/picture above about range); make the first cut; rotate the kerfmaker so that the back end clears the block; slide the fence to meet it; lock down the fence; make the second cut. See my http://lumberjocks.com/projects/159066 for example results. Also, mafe posted a nice blog: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/18170

David

-- MrLaughingbrook

View papadan's profile

papadan

3076 posts in 3065 days


#13 posted 05-01-2017 05:15 PM

Thanks David.

-- Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity!

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