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Wife's Patience Test

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Project by RICOCO posted 05-12-2015 05:21 PM 1391 views 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In 2012 I promised my wife a new kitchen. A year and a half after I started, it’s finally complete. Being on a fixed income the budget was tight to say the least. I told her I could do it for $2500.00. After she stopped laughing I was given the green light. It’s a small kitchen, 9’6” and 6 feet of counter top. All the carcasses are made for 3/4 economy birch ply AKA imported cr*p. However bad it is, it’s still more durable than particle board. For the doors and drawer faces I opted for domestic 3/4 birch ply.
The drawers are 1/2 baltic birch with 1/4 melamine hardboard bottoms on full extension slides. The doors are nothing fancy, inset flat panels, simply edge taped with euro hinges. The counter tops are my pride and joy. Made form 3/4 economy ply cut into 1.5 inch strips of varying lengths from 6 inches to 4 feet and glued together to form the slabs. Titebond 3 and a 10 foot aluminum ladder section was used as straight edge to keep the slab true. I also used my router table with a finger joint bit to lengthen the strips as required. We saved money wherever possible. The under mount sink was greatly discounted at $75.00, I wasn’t about to pay $250.00 for the blind corner hardware so I made my own for about $60.00 from repurposed available hardware. To sum up, the entire project including all the hardware, every screw, and drop of glue came to a grand total of just under $2400.00. My wife reconciled all the receipts and that’s my proof.

Additional info on the counters:

Edge banded with maple for added durability.
I filled any voids with a slurry of Titebond 3 and sanding dust.
The finish on the counter tops is danish oil, 5 coats, allowed to dry a week each coat.
Finally 5 coats of water based poly.

All questions & Comments welcome

Last image is the old kitchen
Paul

-- Paul





14 comments so far

View ksubenny's profile

ksubenny

74 posts in 1323 days


#1 posted 05-12-2015 05:49 PM

Very nicely done and impressive you were able to come in under budget!

View MrFid's profile

MrFid

805 posts in 1370 days


#2 posted 05-12-2015 06:47 PM

Did she let you keep the last hundred for yourself? Nicely done with the kitchen.

-- Bailey F - Eastern Mass.

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1835 days


#3 posted 05-12-2015 06:58 PM

That’s a great lookin’ job, Paul. Coming in under budget deserves praise as well. I’m just getting ready to begin our kitchen remodel, and I’m estimating around $2000 (not including countertops, but including $500 in new tools) and will be using the imported plywood for the boxes/door panels. What do you feel was the biggest problem you ran into?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1511 days


#4 posted 05-12-2015 07:13 PM

Great job. Very clever use of plywood for the countertops.

-- paxorion

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

118 posts in 1197 days


#5 posted 05-12-2015 07:32 PM

Nice job! Very creative way to use the plywood for the counter top. Please post a few more pictures of the counter top surface. Was it difficult to make it consistently flat? I wonder what Baltic Birch (pricey) would look like if utilized in the way you did. Did you use any software for planning or design (e.g. SketchUp, cutlist software, etc.)?

Thanks,
Bill

View RICOCO's profile

RICOCO

46 posts in 2047 days


#6 posted 05-12-2015 10:57 PM

Thanks all for the kind comments.

BinghamtonEd: The biggest issue is the plywood is rarely flat making it very awkward to fit inset doors.

Bill: I clamped the first 3 to 4 rows to the straight edge of an aluminum ladder once the block was stiff enough I placed it on edge and brad nailed and clamped each additional strip avoiding nails near the sink hole and within 2 inches of the ends

I used 3.5 sheets of 4×8 ply. Baltic birch would look great with fewer voids.

I depend heavily on SketchUp. I have cultist but don’t like it much


If you look close you can just see the occasional finger joint

-- Paul

View Levex's profile

Levex

38 posts in 621 days


#7 posted 05-13-2015 12:01 PM

Awesome job on the counter top. It must have been a lot of work but the results look great.

View DustyMark's profile

DustyMark

342 posts in 1535 days


#8 posted 05-13-2015 02:38 PM

You did a great job on your kitchen cabinets! It must feel great to be in the “admiration” phase of such a major project…

-- Mark, Minnesota

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

118 posts in 1197 days


#9 posted 05-13-2015 03:00 PM

Thanks for the additional detail Paul. I think it looks fantastic! It looks a little like Zebrawood. That’s a great idea using your ladder as a straight edge.

Did you considered using LVL (http://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/engineered-products/laminated-veneer-lumber-lvl-strand-lumber/c-5663.htm)? I wonder if LVL would have been more expensive or perhaps the quality isn’t as good?

View RICOCO's profile

RICOCO

46 posts in 2047 days


#10 posted 05-13-2015 07:20 PM



Thanks for the additional detail Paul. I think it looks fantastic! It looks a little like Zebrawood. That s a great idea using your ladder as a straight edge.

Did you considered using LVL (http://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/engineered-products/laminated-veneer-lumber-lvl-strand-lumber/c-5663.htm)? I wonder if LVL would have been more expensive or perhaps the quality isn t as good?

- Bill_Steele

I’ve seen two different types of LVL 1 is made similar to plywood (in layers) that you would still have to cut into strips and reglue. the only advantage I see is you could get the desired length 10’ 12’ 14’ etc.

The other is wood chips and looks like OSB. not the best look for a kitchen.

As for cost I don’t know.

-- Paul

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

582 posts in 1102 days


#11 posted 05-13-2015 10:29 PM

Wow! Great job.
I think that you had a lot of patience also.
I am in the process of drawing up my own kitchen remodel.
How long were you without a kitchen?
That is what will be hard for us.
Thanks for sharing.

-- Chem, Central California

View CJIII's profile

CJIII

154 posts in 1070 days


#12 posted 05-13-2015 11:37 PM

Nice job on the kitchen!

-- Woodworking with Limited Tools

View RICOCO's profile

RICOCO

46 posts in 2047 days


#13 posted 05-15-2015 04:40 AM


Wow! Great job.
I think that you had a lot of patience also.
I am in the process of drawing up my own kitchen remodel.
How long were you without a kitchen?
That is what will be hard for us.
Thanks for sharing.

- fivecodys


Thanks for the nice comments, My wife wouldn’t say patient, but slow.

The sink is the critical item. It took me 4 days to get that back in. tear out the old, repair the walls, repaint, install the cabinets, scribe a template, cut the counter to the template, install the counter, reconnect the plumbing.

loads of fun.

-- Paul

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16955 posts in 2654 days


#14 posted 05-15-2015 08:56 PM

Great work, Happy Wife = Happy Life LOL

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

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