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Chisel Restoration

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Project by WayneC posted 05-28-2007 07:02 PM 5627 views 3 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I went out in the shop to continue sharpening this morning and decided to share some info about this chisel. I pick up old chisels when I come across them if they are reasonably priced. This one did not have a handle and I matched it with one I had in the shop.

I checked the grind angle (25 degrees) and then reground on my grinding wheel. I then went to the Work Sharp and flattened the back of the chisel. There was one low spot and I wish I had a corser grit abrasive. The work sharp comes with 120 grit and you can buy a course grit accessory pack which has a 60 or 80 grit abrasive.

In the picture you can see where I ground a secondary bevel. It is interesting to note that the Work Sharp removes materials more quickly from the outside of the wheel. Not great from an astethics perspective, but it works fine.

To test the chisel, I pared some end grain on a piece of soft wood. It works as advertised.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov





21 comments so far

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2743 days


#1 posted 05-28-2007 07:19 PM

Don’t you just love finding old tools?

makes sense that the worksharp would remove more from the outside edge. Your covering more linear length with each rotation.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2796 days


#2 posted 05-28-2007 07:29 PM

Wayne -

Very nice chisel! I like the handle you made. Looks like I DO need a lathe! Thanks for the update on the Work Sharp.

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#3 posted 05-28-2007 09:36 PM

Actually, the handle came from a box of old handles I keep on hand. I have been picking them up to use as templates for new handles. This one just matched perfectly.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2694 days


#4 posted 05-28-2007 10:38 PM

That restored very nice. I had an old Fuller chisel that I used the Mk.II to put an edge back on that worked very well. I’m interested to read your comments on the worksharp. I looked hard at one but couldn’t get one in Canada at the time I wanted a system. That’s why I went with the Mk.II.

And David, you DON’T have a lathe? Looks like I’ll have to do a video review of the Nova DVRXP to help you spend some money! LOL

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Paul's profile

Paul

649 posts in 2750 days


#5 posted 05-28-2007 10:52 PM

Wayne -

Like you, I pick up chisels when I have the chance. Unlike you, I have restored and sharpened very few of them!

-- Paul, Texas

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#6 posted 05-29-2007 12:38 AM

I’m not sure if you saw it Tom, but I did a full review of the Work Sharp in my blog a couple of days ago. These days blog entries scroll away so fast.

I think they are worth the effort Paul. It is always nice to have good tools. This one is marked the James Swan Company and has an engraved Swan on the blade. It is 1” wide and 16” long with the handle.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2904 days


#7 posted 05-29-2007 06:15 AM

Nice restoration Wayne, I love old wood chisels. Or new ones for that matter. I just like working with them. jockmike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2694 days


#8 posted 05-29-2007 07:30 AM

That’s a good review in your blog. It just whizzed by so I missed it. If it gets past the first page of pulse, I’m boned as well. Thanks for pointing it out!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3058 days


#9 posted 05-29-2007 03:17 PM

Great restoration.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View PanamaJack's profile

PanamaJack

4473 posts in 2735 days


#10 posted 05-29-2007 03:38 PM

I did something like this to an old Framing Chisel. Sharp! Like yours here, it started out like it was ate up with metal termites! Wish I had thought about a “before” pic.

It looks like you can use it now.

-- Carpe Lignum; Tornare Lignum (Seize the wood, to Turn the wood)

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2747 days


#11 posted 05-29-2007 04:21 PM

Wayne.. I have a Worksharp also… I realized, you just have to wait till the left side of the tool is cleaned up for a square look.

A general note for all interested. Correct the math if I am wrong please. : All spinning tools develop more speed at the outside edges which is why larger drill and router bits need to be run at lower speeds. I think the Worksharp runs at around 580 RPM. A point 1/2” out from the center must travel aprox. 3” around the circle. While a point 2 1/2 inches out must travel aprox. 15” in diameter. It is going around 5 or more times faster on one edge of a 2” chisel if you had the chisel set as described. So users must be around 5 times more patiend to grind down the left.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#12 posted 05-30-2007 04:27 AM

Agreed John. I belive your math is correct or very close. Although it is a pain in the a#$ to regrind a quality 1” chisel with 120 or so grit. To get the hollow grind out will take quite a while. I think I am going to buy the course abrasives set to get a lower grit abrasive for grinding the primary angle.

Have you purchased any of the other abrasive packs or have any recommendations relative to the work sharp?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2747 days


#13 posted 05-30-2007 04:38 AM

I think the strength of the tool is the retouching, the Worksharp takes a long time to fix an already severly damaged tool.

I am going to try out some 80 grit or just sharpen the backs on my waterstone to start with. Have you tried the lower grit? Getting out the high and lowspots is the major pain. I mark the backs with a Sharpie so I can see how it is working. I am also thinking about getting another glass plate and loading it with two 80 grit papers so that I can grind the initial nasty chisels without flipping the plate back and forth.

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#14 posted 05-30-2007 04:47 AM

I’ve been using my grinder to fix real bad chisels. I was thinking of getting an extra plate and setting them up as 80/120, 400/1000, and 3600/6000 wheels. I have the leather wheel as well.

I just got it last week and only have the standard abrasives, so I have not tried the lower grit. I’m thinking I would use my waterstones for fine tuning, micro bevels and any cambering that may be needed.

Also, feel free to comment on the write-up of it I did in my blog.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2743 days


#15 posted 08-10-2007 06:52 PM

This just came up in the new front end and I thought I’d chime in. When I needed to flatten the back of an old chisel I clamped my belt sander in my workmate and used and 80 grit belt…..works great for the 1st touch.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

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