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Router table

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Project by jesinfla posted 05-01-2015 03:31 PM 1090 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I created a simple router table that attached to my work bench – I’ve never used a router before.

Unfortunately, it worked better in theory than in practice. When I went to use the router, I placed a scrap board on it, and as I moved the board, the whole table shifted. Not good!

I decided to change the design and went with a box instead – works much better.

I think my router bits though aren’t very sharp – I tried to dado out a channel and it was very difficult moving the board – don’t think it’s supposed to be difficult – is it?

Anyway, it’s not pretty but it’s functional.

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(





9 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2570 days


#1 posted 05-01-2015 11:51 PM

That is a cool design and looks to get the job done!!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

219 posts in 2255 days


#2 posted 05-02-2015 12:28 AM

Jes, I bet the problem was trying to take too deep of a bite in one pass. Try routing your channel in multiple passes, raising the bit like 1/8 of an inch at a time and I think you’ll be golden.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

View htl's profile

htl

2210 posts in 624 days


#3 posted 05-02-2015 03:50 PM

Bob’s comment,
Plus needs a plastic laminate top and fence to help the wood slide across the table.
A good sanding of the top and some paste wax will work but plastic will last a lot longer and be safer to.
A sharp saw blade or router bit are safer because they will cut better through the wood and you don’t have to force it.
Just my $.02

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View jesinfla's profile

jesinfla

274 posts in 602 days


#4 posted 05-03-2015 08:54 AM

Thanks guys – I had the bit set to 1/4” is that too high?

Didn’t think about waxing the top or adding plastic – I have some hardboard perhaps that would work?

The table and I set a board on fire today – not good :(

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2526 posts in 1741 days


#5 posted 05-03-2015 11:02 AM

Yes removing 1/4” in one pass is too much. Removing that much with a 1/4” shank bit could cause bit failure (breakage). Remove 1/8” or less in a single pass and make multiple passes until you reach the depth you want.

If your table isn’t what you envisioned, then maybe these suggestions may help…...

Plan A. If you have a countertop fabricator in your area, you can get a sink cutout for real cheap if not free. A double bowl sink cutout would be a perfect size for a small router table. You would simply square it up, edge band it, and drill holes for the router. A cutout would be HPL (high pressure laminate) over a particle board or MDF substrate and would be a perfect slick/flat work surface.

Plan B. The big box stores may sell melamine shelving or smaller melamine sheet goods (or get a 4×8 sheet and save the rest for another shop project). Buy the appropriate piece and cut it to size. IMO, melamine isn’t as durable as laminate but would be a slick/flat surface.

Plan C. Make your own top. Buy a particle board or MDF substrate from the big box store, a sheet of laminate, contact cement, and a J roller. Apply laminate to both faces to keep it stable and flat. Edge band it and mount your router. You may find suitable precut sizes and not have to buy full sheet goods

Plan D. Purchase a top. Some woodworking vendors sells smaller bench top router tables. You get some of the bells and whistles of the bigger table tops like a fence, miter gage slot, predrilled holes for router mounting, et cetera…..

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View jesinfla's profile

jesinfla

274 posts in 602 days


#6 posted 05-04-2015 11:47 AM

thanks hdc – going to try the 1/8 – sounds like I’m taking off more than I can chew LOL

I’m attaching a hardboard this week to it, waxing it and going to try it again

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#7 posted 05-04-2015 01:10 PM

This won’t be the first router table that you build. You will find that you may have two or three of these. For some projects it’s nice to have more than one router to be set up at the same time. Congratulations on your first router table. It will be a great addition to your shop.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View cnarf's profile

cnarf

53 posts in 1502 days


#8 posted 04-04-2016 07:58 PM

http://www.finewoodworking.com/workshop/video/router-table-tricks-for-deep-cuts.aspx
You might get some useful ideas here.

-- cnarf, Ireland

View jesinfla's profile

jesinfla

274 posts in 602 days


#9 posted 04-04-2016 10:52 PM

Thanks for the link cnarf – just bought a new table from HF and made an additional table for my first router.

Still don’t now how to use the router though LOL

-- They said I could be anything... So I became Sarcastic! They also said making drawers is easy... I think they lied :(

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