LumberJocks

Rain Barrel Stand and Installation

  • Advertise with us
Project by mtairymd posted 04-20-2015 10:43 PM 1112 views 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Build Instructions:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Rain...-Installation/

Video of Build
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvSJxXqfP68

The purpose of a rain barrel is to catch rainwater from a downspout and store it for future use. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that a rain barrel will save most gardeners about 1,300 gallons of water during the hot summer months. Saving water not only helps protect the environment, it saves money and energy. Diverting water from storm drains also decreases the impact of runoff to streams.

This rain barrel shown was provided by a local Community Rain Barrel Program and was funded by a grant through the Chesapeake Bay Trust. To participate in the program, the user had to supply their own platform (at least 2 feet high) and be willing to help raise awareness of the program.





16 comments so far

View SteveW's profile

SteveW

392 posts in 2325 days


#1 posted 04-20-2015 11:30 PM

Heck of a nice rain barrel, and a good looking stand also.
well done!

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! SteveW

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5061 posts in 2614 days


#2 posted 04-21-2015 12:01 AM

This is a great idea!

I’d love to do something like this, but have run into lots of roadblocks. Not the least of which, is that a 55-gallon barrel ain’t gunna fit in the back of my ‘68 Mustang…......!

-- Dean

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

2897 posts in 2488 days


#3 posted 04-21-2015 08:34 AM

Nice rain barrel and stand. We catch all the rain water from our roofs. We have a 10,000 gallon catchment in the rear of the property…you see, where we live they do not have piped in water so catching from the roof and hauling it in is the only way we have of having water. We pump the water into the house through several filters

-- Larry in Hawaii,

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

700 posts in 854 days


#4 posted 04-21-2015 01:55 PM

Looks nice but I would attach this to the wall somehow to prevent it from being pulled over accidentally. Since it is so high and top heavy this could be pretty dangerous if a kid decided to climb on it our something.

I’ve got a 50 gallon rain barrel that we made out of a food grade barrel a few years ago. I spray painted it with a stone flex color to make it look nicer (it was bright blue). It only takes about 1/10 inch of rain before it overflows. If I had room for it I would put in a giant tank and use it for all my lawn irrigation.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View artsyfartsy's profile

artsyfartsy

648 posts in 625 days


#5 posted 04-21-2015 02:42 PM

Pretty nice idea. I’d like to have one right about now, it’s raining outside and I’m missing the catch of the day. LOL Is that grant available nationwide or just for your area?

-- DWelch. Michigan, The only dumb question is the one not asked!

View Fettler's profile

Fettler

200 posts in 1464 days


#6 posted 04-21-2015 06:25 PM

From a safety perspective, you might want to secure that barrel so that it doesn’t fall over and injury a small child.

BTW, i really like the video and design.

-- --Rob, Seattle, WA

View leafherder's profile

leafherder

897 posts in 1419 days


#7 posted 04-21-2015 08:01 PM

Nice stand. My city sponsored a “build your own rain barrel” workshop a few years ago in partnership with the local Soil and Water Conservation District – I was one of the first to sign up. It is not as nice as yours, but the local authorities only recommended a 1 foot tall stand (they suggested concrete blocks which is what I used, even made a nice little brick “patio” for the blocks to sit on.). I would be interested in learning why your requirements are a 2 foot tall stand.

My 55 gallon barrel fills up with half inch of rain, and I have not had to use City water for gardens or houseplants since I got it. I did have to change the spout this year after the plastic spigot cracked.

Thanks for posting and spreading the word about rain barrels.

-- Leafherder

View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#8 posted 04-21-2015 08:55 PM

Thank you.


Heck of a nice rain barrel, and a good looking stand also.
well done!

- SteveW


View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#9 posted 04-21-2015 08:56 PM



This is a great idea!

I d love to do something like this, but have run into lots of roadblocks. Not the least of which, is that a 55-gallon barrel ain t gunna fit in the back of my 68 Mustang…......!

- Mean_Dean

It wouldn’t fit in my car either. The grant people were nice enough to drop it off at my house :)

View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#10 posted 04-21-2015 08:59 PM



Nice rain barrel and stand. We catch all the rain water from our roofs. We have a 10,000 gallon catchment in the rear of the property…you see, where we live they do not have piped in water so catching from the roof and hauling it in is the only way we have of having water. We pump the water into the house through several filters

- Hawaiilad


Wow, that’s a lot of water. I was wondering where you lived to need that type of supply. I was thinking Alaska – then I saw your signature – very envious :)

View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#11 posted 04-21-2015 09:02 PM



Looks nice but I would attach this to the wall somehow to prevent it from being pulled over accidentally. Since it is so high and top heavy this could be pretty dangerous if a kid decided to climb on it our something.

I ve got a 50 gallon rain barrel that we made out of a food grade barrel a few years ago. I spray painted it with a stone flex color to make it look nicer (it was bright blue). It only takes about 1/10 inch of rain before it overflows. If I had room for it I would put in a giant tank and use it for all my lawn irrigation.

- Lazyman

Good idea. I will add that note to the build instructions on instructables. Note that this version has a diverter to prevent overflows.

View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#12 posted 04-21-2015 09:06 PM



Pretty nice idea. I d like to have one right about now, it s raining outside and I m missing the catch of the day. LOL Is that grant available nationwide or just for your area?

- artsyfartsy

I live in Maryland and my grant was provided by the Chesapeake Trust. The goal is to reduce runoff to the Bay. I would check with your local EPA to see if anything is available in your area. If not, the barrels with kits only run around $85. The next county over from us is selling them for $30.

View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#13 posted 04-21-2015 09:06 PM



From a safety perspective, you might want to secure that barrel so that it doesn t fall over and injury a small child.

BTW, i really like the video and design.

- Fettler

Noted…Thanks!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7487 posts in 1474 days


#14 posted 04-21-2015 10:40 PM

Good idea. I’ve been thinking of just using one of those blue plastic barrels (if I can find one cheap) to catch some for my plants also.

Why is the faucet so high off the bottom of the barrel? Looks like you can only get 2/3 of the water out.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View mtairymd's profile

mtairymd

96 posts in 847 days


#15 posted 04-21-2015 11:42 PM



Nice stand. My city sponsored a “build your own rain barrel” workshop a few years ago in partnership with the local Soil and Water Conservation District – I was one of the first to sign up. It is not as nice as yours, but the local authorities only recommended a 1 foot tall stand (they suggested concrete blocks which is what I used, even made a nice little brick “patio” for the blocks to sit on.). I would be interested in learning why your requirements are a 2 foot tall stand.

My 55 gallon barrel fills up with half inch of rain, and I have not had to use City water for gardens or houseplants since I got it. I did have to change the spout this year after the plastic spigot cracked.

Thanks for posting and spreading the word about rain barrels.

- leafherder


Thanks. I don’t know why 2 feet was required by the county. All you need is enough to get the desired pressure head. I needed 3 feet since the barrel is in a low portion of my yard and I plan to use a drip hose to water some shrubs. Yes, I assume I will only get a few years of use from the spigot.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com