LumberJocks

Honey Locust and Walnut Tea Box.

  • Advertise with us
Project by Combo Prof posted 04-11-2015 03:15 PM 1107 views 1 time favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This box made of Honey lucust and Walnut with an Oak plywood panel bottom is 4.375” x 7” x 11.25”. So (Width)/(Height) ~ (Length)/(Width) ~ the golden ratio (approximately). Thus the sides of each of the 9 sections are also in golden ratio proportion. A channel or pocket is necessary under the chain and I wanted the box to look balanced, so made a 1/4” channel around the divided insert. This I suppose is the new design feature this project highlights. The Box was built and finished in 3-4 days for silent auction at our chapter trout unlimited banquet tonight. Besides the charity I was also motivated to build this because the banquet chair is the fishing partner who sold me many of the better hand planes that formerly belong to his uncle. I was in hurry so I did use power tools, but the box was smoothed with planes and cabinet scrapers and the hinges were mortised by tennon saw, chisel and knife. Boxguy gave me some useful instruction concerning the chain.

(I was formerly the LJ known as Comboprof with no-space between Combo and prof.)

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)





4 comments so far

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2168 posts in 1727 days


#1 posted 04-12-2015 01:33 AM

Don, thanks for the mention. I like the symmetry of this box. You can’t go wrong with the Golden Ratio. You would be the ideal person to explain the history and theory of this ratio. It looks very nice. The top turned out well. Glad the chain worked out. Keep boxing and keep posting.

-- Big Al in IN

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2373 posts in 737 days


#2 posted 04-12-2015 02:26 AM

Thanks Alan the final bid on the box was $110. I don’t think this means it would sell from a store for $110, but I was glad it generated that much for our TU Chapters stream conservation activities. It was one of the items with the most bidding action.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View ignatz's profile

ignatz

77 posts in 711 days


#3 posted 04-20-2015 08:19 PM

Beautiful box! How did you like working with the honey locust wood?

-- "I have learned from my mistakes, and I am sure I can repeat them exactly" — Peter Cook

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2373 posts in 737 days


#4 posted 04-21-2015 01:02 AM

So let me tell you about Honey locust. It is as you see very pretty. The piece I picked up was a true 1” by 8” by 32” piece with a couple of knots for $2. (By true I mean actual measurements, i.e. 1 is not 3/4” .) I used almost every bit of it. It was re-sawn and planed to two halves of even thickness. That was all fine. But near one of the knots there was a little tear out and where I cut mortice for the second hinge I had some trouble, because of the small knot on the backside. But in the end with cabinet scraper and smoothing planes it all worked out. I put more hours into then I would have liked, but it was for a good cause. Honey locust has long grain and splinters easily.
But cuts clean, and carves well under the knife. Its hard and its thorns were once used for nails. I broke a 1/16 drill bit in it when drilling the screw holes for the hinges. I could not remove the broken bit. Only time I heard a drill bit squeak when it was turned into the wood. Probably should have waxed it. I was cursing this wood at times but in the end I liked it. If and when I use it again, I would be sure to have enough to avoid knots even small ones. It sure made a pretty box. It took glue up with no problems and it took finish well. (Tongue oil and poly. I did not have time for other types of finish) Give it a try. Boxguy tells me he loves it.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com