LumberJocks

Shaper Dough Nut or is it Donut?

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Project by robscastle posted 04-09-2015 06:46 AM 1330 views 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I havent been doing much wood work lately as I have been preparing The Castle for a paint make over, but is still has not happend due to inclement weather, but the preparation work has kept me busy.

Then there was the Easter Break, and of course the supply of lots of Easter eggs which had to be consumed, along with lots of holidays and other activities as well.

Anyway along with the chocolate Easter Eggs I managed to knock over a dough Nut as well.

A lot more heathier than loads of Chockies I tell you.

Its for my shaper

I cut the stock with the bandsaw, then sanded it to fit the opening.

Once that was done all the other work was done using the Shaper itself and a series of various router bits some having conventional use others used because they would work with what I was doing.

Removal of the excess material was completed with a rabbeting bit

Penetrating of the center was with a T Slot cutter,I held the donut in place and gently raised the bit .

Shaping of the outside and removal of stock inside was done with a 2.5” round over bit.

The final drilling of the locating holes was completed using the insert as a template guide

All should work without jambing anywhere.

Then a final sand and wax completed the job.

Ready to roll!

  • Post Comment:*

This may actually be a tool tip rather than a project but hindsight is a great thing !!

-- Regards Robert





11 comments so far

View BobWemm's profile

BobWemm

1816 posts in 1393 days


#1 posted 04-09-2015 08:49 AM

Looks really good Rob.

Bob.

-- Bob, Western Australia, The Sun came up this morning, what a great start to the day. Now it's up to me to make it even better. I've cut this piece of wood 4 times and it's still too damn short.

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

326 posts in 998 days


#2 posted 04-09-2015 11:51 AM

Please excuse my ignorance, what is the purpose of the Dough nut?

View David Dean's profile

David Dean

604 posts in 2365 days


#3 posted 04-09-2015 12:24 PM

good work Rob.

View intjonmiller's profile

intjonmiller

20 posts in 1288 days


#4 posted 04-09-2015 02:50 PM

I’m with TechTeacher04. I don’t understand what this is for. But then I’ve only used a shaper a couple times, almost a decade ago, and that was just with a power feeder doing raised panel doors. I’m really quite curious about this.

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1918 posts in 1782 days


#5 posted 04-09-2015 08:39 PM

+1 with TechTeacher04 and intjonmiller … ?

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View mafe's profile

mafe

11172 posts in 2556 days


#6 posted 04-10-2015 12:17 AM

Help us?
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1671 days


#7 posted 04-10-2015 07:27 AM

Hello fellow LJs,
Try as I did to delete this project and post it in the correct area as a tool tip in Blogs I could not work out how to do it.
So I thought I could just cut and paste it, I failed there also.

Next step was to delete it outright I could not even do that, I guess its fess up time!

The donut, or dough nut however it is correctly spelled for my shaper is hereby explained.

I must apologise as I do not know if its the correct name which is possibly why its causing the confusion.

Anyway a description of what it does and why I made it follows:-

Background:
As you would be all aware a Shaper/Moulder/Router Table is great for profiling edges as long as they are not too high, otherwise its a matter of raising the bit to suit.

However making curved legs for chairs incorporating Maloof Joints requires the ability to be able to move the curved surface, and I am talking concave shaped sides here across the path of a round over bit, or the appropiate profile you require, whilst having a large section of material at either end, that being a section for a Joint or a section for a foot.

Its not a “must have” but it makes the profiling task quicker, otherwise it would be out with the rasp or profile file.

After seeing the reply posts asking what is was for I was firstly concerned about giving out incorrect information.

Hence the reason for attempting to remove and relocate it.

So I went looking on the net, and sure enough possibly as you guys had already found out, there is almost nothing relating to wood work.

Lots of hair do donuts but not a lot else.

However I did find a utube video by our very own LJ Canadian wood works profiling curved Sam Maloof chair legs.
So I would suggest that you take a look at it and It hink you will say a silent “Oh now i understand”, when you see him using his Shaper.

I hope this helps!....and I promise never to post tips as Projects again!

-- Regards Robert

View mafe's profile

mafe

11172 posts in 2556 days


#8 posted 04-10-2015 10:30 AM

Thanks now I get it.
Here are the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYnzoGFL380
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View NoThanks's profile

NoThanks

798 posts in 995 days


#9 posted 04-10-2015 01:20 PM

Thank You for one of the below,

For the Update
For the Youtube explanation
For not Posting tips again!

You decide which one.

J/K, of course thanking you for the update and youtube, post your tips any time. :)

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

326 posts in 998 days


#10 posted 04-10-2015 04:25 PM

Thank you, makes perfect sense now.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1671 days


#11 posted 04-10-2015 08:42 PM

Glad to be of assistance

-- Regards Robert

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