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Mini Krenov hand plane - in respect for the master

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Project by mafe posted 04-05-2015 03:25 PM 3308 views 3 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Mini Krenov hand plane
in respect for the master.

Just became so full of smiles when I finished this little fellow today, that I could not help share him with you.
Most of you are familiar with James Krenov , his wonderful planes, woodworking and the plane making technique he refined and made into a trade mark, that will pass down in history.
I am working on a handful of mini planes and like to give them different styles, this one became in honor of James Krenov, respect!


Pictures:
1. Palm size Krenov plane.
2. Luthier, Krenov and mini kanna jointer.
3. Less is enough… 4 – 8,4 – 12,5 cm
4. Size does matter, small can be really good.
5. Finish a wee rough in the spirit of Krenov.
6. Nice tight mouth.


Foolish shot!

The blade on this one are from a old French lot of blades I bought some years back.
Hand forged, from Peugeot, and had already been changed from a bench plane iron into a narrow width iron.
Yes you read it right, the French car company.
Peugeot:
http://www.peugeotdesignlab.com/en/studio-3/history?view=produit&id=49
More info on types:
http://toolemera.com/Manufacturers%20&%20Merchants/Mfg.%20pqr/mfg.peugeotfreres.html

Later I will share a blog on the build of a bunch of little planes.

Perhaps this can inspire others to make planes in all sizes, it is great fun.

Best thoughts,

MaFe

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.





26 comments so far

View gsimon's profile

gsimon

1198 posts in 1581 days


#1 posted 04-05-2015 03:36 PM

nice homage! the pics are perfect

-- Greg Simon

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8768 posts in 1308 days


#2 posted 04-05-2015 03:43 PM

Mini’s are great, Mads! Thanks for sharing the smiles.

-- God bless, Candy

View Andre's profile

Andre

1023 posts in 1274 days


#3 posted 04-05-2015 03:46 PM

Looks good, but pretty sure his planes did not use a brass cross pin, In his book The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking on pages 86 and 87 there is a picture of one of his planes, shows the hand carved cross pin, and his preferred style of wedge. There is a small School in Roberts Creek British Columbia where a lot of his tools now call home, if you ever get the chance or are in the area you have to go there!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1344 posts in 2481 days


#4 posted 04-05-2015 03:47 PM

What are you using for the plane irons?

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3557 posts in 2029 days


#5 posted 04-05-2015 04:10 PM

mafe

I sure would like to know more about making them.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View rayn's profile

rayn

162 posts in 2686 days


#6 posted 04-05-2015 04:13 PM

Beautiful ! You have created an heirloom tool

-- Ray,Iowa

View siavosh's profile

siavosh

674 posts in 1339 days


#7 posted 04-05-2015 04:54 PM

Beautiful set, they might belong in that museum :)

-- http://woodspotting.com/ -- Discover the most interesting woodworking blogs from around the world

View mafe's profile (online now)

mafe

11175 posts in 2557 days


#8 posted 04-05-2015 05:01 PM

Rad457, you are completely right, he made them of wood in full scale, here you can see how they are made when I full size of wood: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/20806 , on larger versions the wood pin provides a good hold, so it is much preferred, on these small versions there are not so much force going up, and the wood pin could easily break, when wedged, so I prefer brass or steel pins on smaller planes.
On the luthier version I made, I roughed the back of the pin a wee bit to create non slip.
(I got the book and made a few of both types).
I would love to go and see that place one day. ;-) Thanks.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View mafe's profile (online now)

mafe

11175 posts in 2557 days


#9 posted 04-05-2015 05:10 PM

I do have a small piece of ivory, so perhaps one fine day… Smiles.
Here a wonderful video with the master: http://www.finewoodworking.com/woodworking-plans/video/james-krenov-on-handplanes.aspx

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4881 posts in 2135 days


#10 posted 04-05-2015 06:23 PM

Nice little plane and does not look overly complicated so I maybe able to make one with my limited wood working skills .

But this the plane I would like to make one day because it is the one my uncle I Germany used most and brings back memory’s of my youth .
So keep teasing and one day it will happen and I will make a plane or maybe a set .
Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View Northwest29's profile

Northwest29

1503 posts in 1958 days


#11 posted 04-05-2015 06:36 PM

Beautiful little plane! When you find the time please do share your building process with us. TIA

-- Ron, Eugene, OR, "Curiosity is a terrible thing to waste."

View mafe's profile (online now)

mafe

11175 posts in 2557 days


#12 posted 04-05-2015 06:38 PM

The blade are from a old French lot of blades I bought some years back.
Hand forged, from Peugeot, and had already been changed from a bench plane iron into a narrow width iron.
Yes you read it right, the French car company.
Peugeot:
http://www.peugeotdesignlab.com/en/studio-3/history?view=produit&id=49
More info on types:
http://toolemera.com/Manufacturers%20&%20Merchants/Mfg.%20pqr/mfg.peugeotfreres.html

The problem with old blades:
Some of them can’t hold a edge, some are amazing, so it’s best to try them before building the body.
(I did have to scrap one of the planes I am working on, du to that fact…).

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View madts's profile

madts

1686 posts in 1808 days


#13 posted 04-05-2015 07:10 PM

Nice planes Mads. Even though I now can comment.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7175 posts in 2266 days


#14 posted 04-05-2015 08:01 PM

I like ‘em Mads.
Of all my shop made planes, I think I am most attached to the little guys too.
They always make me smile too.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Johnny Boy's profile

Johnny Boy

76 posts in 2687 days


#15 posted 04-05-2015 08:09 PM

My father worked for Peugeot for 30 years. I worked for them a while ago too.
Very well done building by the way.

-- Johnny Boy

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