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Guitar pedal board

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Project by AZWoody posted 03-31-2015 04:57 PM 1821 views 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Aside from my hobby of woodworking, my other love is music.

Guitars, keyboards, violins, anything that I can relax and play. For my guitars, I slowly had built up a rather diverse set of effects pedals. Some I use frequently, others, not so much but I was running out of room on my pedalboard that I had purchased that had a power conditioner and power plugs for my pedals on it. I used it when I used to travel and play concerts and such.

Well, I no longer do that so I dismantled it and integrated the power bar part of it and made a three tier shelf that could hold my pedals and make them easier to access due to the different levels.

Eventually, I will make a seconday for the guitar amp pedals and a few other miscellaneous items. I also made it so I could run the cables underneath the pedals to make the cabling look much more oragnized.

I used some scrap 3/4 plywood I had and for the sides, I used Macacauba which I had some boards extra as well.

The steps are spraypainted black and then everything was covered with several coats of poly spray.





8 comments so far

View htl's profile

htl

2186 posts in 621 days


#1 posted 03-31-2015 08:33 PM

Nicely done!
I can see way that project needed doing.
I have the same problem with my many PC’s, with a lot less cables I would think.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Brohymn62's profile

Brohymn62

125 posts in 1718 days


#2 posted 03-31-2015 10:02 PM

As a guitar player, I’m in awe, great work!

-- Chris G. ; Los Angeles, CA

View danr's profile

danr

154 posts in 2647 days


#3 posted 04-01-2015 02:46 AM

Hey that looks great.

My son has a large collection of those gadgets and has outgrown is old beat up suitcase he was using to haul them around. We have been looking at a solution like yours. My thought was to do something similar but to have a lid (or a top) that latches down to make it a case with a handle for transport. I would also put metal corners on it to make it abuse resistant. Thanks for the inspiration.

Can you tell me a little bit more about that “conditioner” think that goes across the back and has an electrical plug. Its great that you integrated that with the unit.

Thanks,
danr

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#4 posted 04-01-2015 05:07 AM

The power supply was from a Furman pedal board which was basically a large piece of fiberglass covered with velcro. The power supply portion has a surge protector and several 9 volt plugs to power the pedals. It also has 1/4” in, out and effect loop plugs to make it simple to plug in the guitar and amp to the unti and not have to plug into the pedals.

I pretty much just unscrewed it and fit it to a piece of plywood underneath as shown in the first photo.

Unfortunately, there aren’t enough 9 volt plugs for all my pedals so underneath, I attached a JOYO power supply which you can find on Amazon for under $50. It’s worked great and much cheaper than the more well known brands by far.

For my next pedal board, which I want to plug my amps into and then place my wah pedal and the pedals that control the amps I bought a Furman SS-6B which has 6 110v plugs and has surge protection.
Furman has a very good reputation for music based power protection.

Making this portable would be pretty simple I think. Just basically make a reverse set of side boards from the macacauba and basically make a lid that can latch down on the side and have a handle and you’re good to go. I hope you post it when you make it, I’d love to see.

View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#5 posted 04-08-2015 02:33 PM

Nice board….and an impressive array of pedals.

I used to have a large pedal board, but I sold most of them off when I bought a Line6 Hd500 unit a couple years ago. The only pedals I kept were a Cry Baby Wah and a Carbon Copy delay…and my loop station. Here is a small board I built for that..

Do you play professionally?

-- Ed

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#6 posted 04-08-2015 03:24 PM

Thanks. I used to play professionally but back then, I didn’t have many pedals. I was playing fiddle so all l had was reverb, eq pedal and my wireless for the fiddle and the wireless for my inear monitors.

The pedal board I had was the large Furman unit which I broke down to make this one.

This is something to sit and play around and toy with new ideas and sounds. The looper pedal is a blast and really has opened up so much more to what I can do and even helps with practicing.


Nice board….and an impressive array of pedals.

I used to have a large pedal board, but I sold most of them off when I bought a Line6 Hd500 unit a couple years ago. The only pedals I kept were a Cry Baby Wah and a Carbon Copy delay…and my loop station. Here is a small board I built for that..

Do you play professionally?

- handsawgeek


View handsawgeek's profile

handsawgeek

591 posts in 858 days


#7 posted 04-08-2015 06:06 PM

Hey, I play e-violin,too!! It’s actually my main instrument. What kind do you have?

Yep, loop stations are really nice for practicing. Many times I’ve layered up little ‘back-up tracks’ with guitar, bass (guitar run through an octaver), and percussion patterns. The looper never gets tired, but I can practice riffs and improvs until my fingers bleed!

Some of my favorite effects that I use regularly with the violin are:
Octaver: Takes things down to viola and high cello range
Wah: really cool with violin
Phaser: also very effective with violin. I prefer the Script 90 version
Distortion: This one’s tricky. I’ve found the ones that work best with violin are the high gain ‘metal’ varieties. More subtle distortion pedals don’t give too much difference until you bounce the bow and let the notes free-ring.
Chorus: Gives a ‘fatter’, multiple violin sound to the proceedings.

-- Ed

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#8 posted 04-08-2015 07:41 PM

When I played concerts I just added a little reverb to make it not sound so sterile and then the EQ was to tone down a little of the tinniness that you can get from a piezo but mainly to use it as a booster for solos.

I have actual violins that have bridges with a piezo built into them. They guy who makes them used to work with Barcus Barry back in the 70s when they first started making their electric violins. They work great.

I have 3 violins, 2 that were custom ordered and another one that’s little bit thicker depth than a standard and strung with heavier strings and tuned down an octave and it sounds just like a cello. Barcus Barry I think called it a chin cello back in the day when they first started making them but now they’re called either a baritone violin and there are some other names which I can’t recall. It had a cool story that the wood was from a post office that was torn down in Oregon from the 1800s.

When I have some time, I”m going to have to plug one in through my pedal board and let ‘er rip.

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