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Table Saw Straight Line Rip Jig

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Project by ilyac posted 03-28-2015 08:40 PM 5809 views 20 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My previous project (My First Cutting Board) taught me a lot. Most importantly, I can force my way through a project with not much more than a table saw and moxy, but man o’ man would it be nice to have some jigs to make my life easier.

So I decide to make a straight line rip jig so I can get a nice clean line on slightly warped wood nice and easy. I made some dados for small miter tracks that will have some aluminium hold down clamps using my crosscut sled, and a similar one on the bottom for a UHMW miter bar. Again, because of Florida + no HVAC in the garage, I wanted something that would not warp with the brutal humidity we have down here.

I could have not had the miter bar at all, but since I have the aluminium tracks, I did not want to risk a “d’oh” moment, use my fence as my guide, and set it too far in. I cut the whole thing straight after I put my miter bar in so that now it’s zero-clearance when I straight line rip as well.

I tossed some paste wax on it so that it glides smooth, and that’s about it. A test piece worked great in it. Whole thing it 12” wide, 24” long.

As per usual, my lesson learned:

1. It’s very easy to forget that when making dados on a normal table saw blade, take the blade thickness into account. I now realize why thinks like Kerfmakers exist. Woops.

(only one lesson this time, must have been a fluke, I promise more mistakes in my next project)





7 comments so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2154 days


#1 posted 03-29-2015 12:07 AM

I have one identical to yours except my hold downs and T track are shop made. I just used it today to cut tapers (it is much safer than using one of those hinged taper jigs that slide along the fence). I really wish I had one 8’ long for straight edging slabs.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View ilyac's profile

ilyac

54 posts in 1542 days


#2 posted 03-29-2015 01:32 AM

when I first decide to make this I figured I would make the hold downs myself as well, but I was at a Woodworking Show in Tampa hoping to get some lumber, but no one was selling anything (not a lot of lumber yards down here) so I decided to pick up a few odds and ends at one of the booths, those were a few bucks a piece.

I think it will be a while before I need a 8’ long one though, kudos to you for even needing something like that!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2154 days


#3 posted 03-29-2015 02:05 AM

I have a sawmill and saw a lot of live edge slabs. I usually straight edge them on the mill.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3140 days


#4 posted 03-29-2015 04:09 AM

I like it! nice idea.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View devann's profile

devann

2201 posts in 2156 days


#5 posted 03-29-2015 12:19 PM

Nice looking jig you made there. Correct me if I’m wrong, but is it just for straightening shorter pieces of stock? I guessing 36” and shorter?

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View ilyac's profile

ilyac

54 posts in 1542 days


#6 posted 03-29-2015 12:53 PM

Devann, exactly. When I was previously cutting my maple into thinner strips they had a tendency to warp a bit. I don’t have a jointer so previously if I wanted to correct that I had to use a straight edge and my router, which was a cumbersome mess.

If i’m not worried about chipout I could go beyond the 24” length of my jig. I didn’t want to make something so large that it would be combursom to use and for the time being the 24” jig is exactly what I need.

View devann's profile

devann

2201 posts in 2156 days


#7 posted 03-29-2015 03:03 PM

Thank you for your reply iylac, I have a similar jig but I made it for eight foot stock. Yes, it is big and cumbersome. I was hoping for a duh moment that would render mine obsolete. I’m sometimes quick to make a jig without a lot of forethought.

To your jointer situation. You can make a poor man’s jointer if you have a router table. A split fence is required. I do it with a 2” straight cut bit. Set the fence offset with a pair of small washers used as depth of cut gauges against the infeed side of the fence. I do this by standing the washers on edge against the infeed side of the fence and using a steel ruler set against the outfeed side of the fence for alignment. Once the fence is aligned and tightened so it moves as one fence I set the straight edge to the cutter with the cutter touching the straight edge. This only works for shorter boards, 4’ or less & that are no more than 1 1/2” thick. It’ll give you a nice smooth, 90° edge on your board. Good for glue up applications.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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