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Shooting Board and Plane

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Project by Todd Swartwood posted 03-23-2015 07:13 PM 1825 views 1 time favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been watching guys using shooting boards with end results close to perfect.
I decided it was time to have a shooting board for myself.I rebuilt an old Sargent #5 that I did not use much anymore.
The most important thing for this transformation was an angled tote. Changing the tote was really pretty straight forward. I first made a regular new tote out of Bloodwood, I then made a transition to angle the tote out of hard maple.
I must admit I am a little disappointed, I do not seem to find myself using it very often.
I must say however it does do what it is supposed to do and that is true up end grain very well.

Well thanks much for looking and comments do encourage me to post things more often.

Have a blessed day and fun making dust, Todd

-- Todd Swartwood (Todd Swart-Woodworks)





15 comments so far

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Andre

1018 posts in 1266 days


#1 posted 03-23-2015 08:17 PM

Board looks good! I use my 60 1/2 on a small board which I will replace with a bigger one some day.
I find the low angle works much better on end grains.
You are right, unless you make a lot of picture frames a shooting board usually isn’t on the bench all day!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#2 posted 03-23-2015 10:28 PM

I’ve watched videos of shooting boards being used but wondered how does the plane not plane the shooting board (if that makes sense)? Is it just the little section solid section of mouth/throat with no blade? Seems like Tom Fridgen uses his after every saw cut.

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Mark Davisson

597 posts in 2777 days


#3 posted 03-23-2015 11:42 PM

hotbyte, you are correct. The plane does plane the board where the blade makes contact with it, but the line of the board that makes contact with that solid section remains unscathed.

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

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JoeinGa

7472 posts in 1467 days


#4 posted 03-23-2015 11:48 PM

I’m glad you asked that hotbyte, I wondered the same thing.

Looks good Todd. Since I seldom (almost never) use my plane, I think I’ll pass on this one :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#5 posted 03-24-2015 12:33 AM

Thanks Mark!

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mafe

11135 posts in 2549 days


#6 posted 03-24-2015 12:19 PM

Really fine board, and fine idea to change the handle.
My shooting board are also not in use too often, but when I need it, I love it.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View JayT's profile

JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#7 posted 03-24-2015 12:39 PM

Nice job on the board & tote, Todd.


I ve watched videos of shooting boards being used but wondered how does the plane not plane the shooting board (if that makes sense)? Is it just the little section solid section of mouth/throat with no blade? Seems like Tom Fridgen uses his after every saw cut.

- hotbyte

You are correct, here is a good graphic from an article on Derek Cohen’s website.

The other thing to keep in mind is that the shooting plane is riding on and referencing off of the side, not the sole any more. That little lip now becomes just a stop and you have to be conscious of not tipping the plane into the cut. The side and sole on a plane used for shooting need to be exactly perpendicular because of this.

When working with hand tools, a handsaw or miter box & saw is used to get a board close to the final dimension and pretty square, then the shooting board is used to finish it off precisely. If you are cutting crosscuts and miters by hand, a shooting board and plane are essential.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Florida_Jim's profile

Florida_Jim

83 posts in 2337 days


#8 posted 03-24-2015 12:56 PM

That looks very good. I like the modified plane.
How did you do the long screw through the tote at an angle?

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#9 posted 03-24-2015 01:04 PM

Great picture and explanation JayT!

I’m wanting to grow my hand tool use and these projects/topics are great!!!

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3557 days


#10 posted 03-24-2015 01:05 PM

Very nice.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#11 posted 03-24-2015 01:05 PM



How did you do the long screw through the tote at an angle?

Looking at pictures 4 and 5 I think Todd used an angled “adaptor” piece. This piece probably screws into the plane and the original handle screws into the adaptor.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View JayT's profile

JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#12 posted 03-24-2015 01:58 PM



Great picture and explanation JayT!

I m wanting to grow my hand tool use and these projects/topics are great!!!

- hotbyte

Then I would highly recommend Derek’s website: http://inthewoodshop.com/

He is a fellow LJ member and there are a lot of good articles on his site. One of the things I really like is that Derek explains why he does things a certain way, not just how. Makes it easier to apply principles across to other projects.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View sepeck's profile

sepeck

314 posts in 1601 days


#13 posted 03-24-2015 06:19 PM

I am planning on making the Paul Sellers shooting board myself at some point.
In the video around 38:40 he discusses the step created by the blade that JayT’s reply mentions

-- -Steven Peck, http://www.blkmtn.org

View Todd Swartwood's profile

Todd Swartwood

257 posts in 1185 days


#14 posted 03-25-2015 11:59 PM

Hi Guys:
rad457, The only plane I own that is low angle is a number of block planes. I have no problem with the plane cutting end grain, the plane needs to have a good sharp iron.

hotbyte, JayT’s diagram is on the money, it is just that little section keeps it working.

Mark, thanks for jumping in and helping with the details.

Hey Joe, your just having to much fun with the lathe right now.

Mads, Thanks for taking the time for a short comment.

JayT, thanks for the diagram, that picture was worth a lot of words. And you are quite right about cleaning up hand saw cuts. Thanks for your comments.

Jim, I actually put the threaded rod into the plane, and then by using the modified tote bent the rod to the right angle. I then put the tote over the rod and tightened down the brass tote nut. I did have to drill the hole through
the tote a little bigger than usual. Thanks for the positive comments.

Wayne, Thanks for taking the time to comment.

Sawdust, Thanks for trying to explain, but I actually made the tote and then glued the transition to the bottom of tote. I then completed contouring until it fit the plane and my eye. I then drilled vertically up through the transition
about 3/4” and the turned the tote over and drilled at the angle to intersect with the vertical hole.

sepeck, thanks for taking the time to comment.

Thanks to all for your kind words.
Have a blessed evening, and having fun making dust, Todd

-- Todd Swartwood (Todd Swart-Woodworks)

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mafe

11135 posts in 2549 days


#15 posted 03-26-2015 12:25 AM

;-)

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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