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Knife with replaceable Swann Morton scalpel blades

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Project by Rick M posted 03-21-2015 04:35 AM 2079 views 5 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Bought these Swann Morton blades last fall but didn’t want to epoxy them into the handle. Whats the fun in have disposable blades if you have to resharpen them. The process was pretty simple although I had one hiccup along the way, the knife is working fine now. Don’t judge my carving skills, that was just to test it out :)

Also made a short video with more detail.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/





8 comments so far

View camps764's profile

camps764

867 posts in 1825 days


#1 posted 03-21-2015 12:53 PM

Great video Rick. I have a pack of those disposable blades sitting in front of me as I type this :) I’ve made a few epoxied knifes as well, but I like your design better.

One suggestion for future videos – the balance between your music and your voice is kind of off – your voice is quiet and then the music gets really loud. I think you did a great job editing the sequences together and your narration is good. I think if you tweaked your sound balance a bit you’d have a really good video.

-- Steve

View CL810's profile

CL810

3452 posts in 2454 days


#2 posted 03-21-2015 01:29 PM

Rick, thanks for making and posting the video. Well done on all fronts including the project.

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

1154 posts in 1099 days


#3 posted 03-21-2015 02:53 PM

so I think the wood failed because you didn’t clamp it. The C/A is not as strong as the yellow.

One hint would be to change the orientation of the endgrain to hold the blade. Endgrain gives less than longgrain.

Longgrain dents easily, while endgrain is meant to take structural strength.
It’s only a small amount, so no need to worry about movement.

Also I would sand the wood slices to a fraction thinner than the slot, so when you clamp it it is getting the full effect, if it is tight, it probably is forcing the end open, rather than allowing it to close on end.
And CLAMP.

For a chip knife, recess the blade even more, for more support. Your knife would be very good for a marking knife.

-- Jeff NJ

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#4 posted 03-21-2015 04:49 PM



Great video Rick. I have a pack of those disposable blades sitting in front of me as I type this :) I ve made a few epoxied knifes as well, but I like your design better.

One suggestion for future videos – the balance between your music and your voice is kind of off – your voice is quiet and then the music gets really loud. I think you did a great job editing the sequences together and your narration is good. I think if you tweaked your sound balance a bit you d have a really good video.

- camps764

Thank you for the feedback. I tried recording the voice over through the editing software and it had volume issues. I’ll use Audacity next time. I’ll watch the music volume too.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#5 posted 03-21-2015 04:55 PM


so I think the wood failed because you didn t clamp it. The C/A is not as strong as the yellow.

One hint would be to change the orientation of the endgrain to hold the blade. Endgrain gives less than longgrain.

Longgrain dents easily, while endgrain is meant to take structural strength.
It s only a small amount, so no need to worry about movement.

Also I would sand the wood slices to a fraction thinner than the slot, so when you clamp it it is getting the full effect, if it is tight, it probably is forcing the end open, rather than allowing it to close on end.
And CLAMP.

For a chip knife, recess the blade even more, for more support. Your knife would be very good for a marking knife.

- woodchuckerNJ

Good point on the end vs long grain. The veneer was exactly the width of the kerf so the glue scraped off and starved the joint. You may be right about wedging it open, although it looks fine from the outside. I have several ideas on how to improve the knife, depending on how this performs over time, I may make a stronger version.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5238 posts in 1509 days


#6 posted 03-21-2015 04:56 PM

Looks like a lot of effort went into making this. Informative video too.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4881 posts in 2132 days


#7 posted 03-21-2015 10:49 PM

I like that handle but a strop would help extending the live of the blade disposable or not no reason to waste them .

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#8 posted 03-22-2015 04:02 AM


I like that handle but a strop would help extending the live of the blade disposable or not no reason to waste them .
- kiefer

These are carbon steel so you could easily strop or resharpen, many people do. I’ve been tossing box cutter, hobby, and razor blades for many years, gone through thousands of them, and have no interest in resharpening.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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