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Moxon Vise & Lamb's Tongue

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Project by Luke Addington posted 03-20-2015 01:00 AM 4637 views 33 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My favorite shop tool. 8/4 air dried maple from my Amish friends in Ohio. Benchcrafted hardware. Works beautifully and saves my back on a daily basis!

The plans for the Moxon vise can be found on the Benchcrafted website for free, so if you’re interested in building this vise I would suggest downloading them so you can see how easy this build is! In this picture I have my centers lined up and marked, as well as the mortise for the fixed jaw marked out.
http://benchcrafted.com/PDF%20Files/Benchcrafted%20Moxon%20Vise.pdf

I worked over at my tablesaw because the light is much better there for pictures. Takes too long to go back and forth from the bench to the saw.

Stabilizer block for the back of the vise.

I got this diagram from Chris Schwarz’s article here: http://www.leevalley.com/US/newsletters/Woodworking/5/3/article1.htm
and resized it until it was 1 3/8” wide. Then I printed it on cardstock and carefully cut it out.

To layout the Lamb’s Tongue, mark a point (mine was about 5 inches in, but go with whatever you think looks good) and trace your template. Then flip it over and trace it on the other face of the chop. Then use your marking gauge to scribe a line from the top of one end of the template to the other, then repeat on the opposite face. Keep the same setting so things remain even.

I used my crosscut saw to cut right down to the corner of the template. This will help out a lot later. Repeat on the opposite end.

Then (still using the handsaw) I made a cut every half inch, making sure not to go past my scribe lines. This took about 5 minutes.

After that I used a 3/8” mortise chisel to pop the waste out. Also make sure to get your table saw or benchtop as messy as possible, that’s really going to help you out here.

After chopping out the waste I used a spokeshave set for a heavy cut to take out the bulk of the material. A drawknife would be ideal here, but I don’t have one. As I got close to my scribe lines I set the spokeshave for a light cut and eased up to the lines. Then I used a rabbeting block plane to get into the corners, planing across the grain. This whole process only took about 10 minutes.

Now it’s time to work on the Lamb’s Tongue. I used my fret saw to saw out most of the waste. On a smaller Lamb’s Tongue you can use a bench chisel for the whole process, but I did not want to remove this much waste in hard maple with a chisel alone.

I used a 1/2” bench chisel to pare close to the line. I kept the chisel skewed and worked across the grain taking light cuts

To carve the tip of the Lamb’s Tongue I used a #6, 14mm gouge. I think any gouge #3-#6 would do fine here. Used a scooping action to remove the waste.

Used a file to clean it up.

Then I sanded it and took it up through 0000 steel wool.

The shadows are pretty dramatic.

Applied a simple tung oil finish.

This is the contact cement I found and it seemed to do a good job. I brushed the first coat on the suede (not on the wood at this time) and let it dry for 20 minutes. Think of this as your pore filling coat.

Normally you would only glue the suede to the movable jaw. But I usually work in wood species that are softer than hard maple and am concerned about marring the workpieces. I cut the piece of suede in half and put it on both sides of the jaws when I had it together earlier and the grip was rock solid. It did not seem to diminish the holding power at all. I also used a board that went the full distance between screws and there was no movement when the vise was tightened.

After the 20 minutes were up I brushed the second coat on the suede and immediately went to apply the cement to the wood. I live in Tucson, AZ, so the temperature in the shop that day was around 100°.

With the hardware in

Thank you for taking a look!

-- Luke, http://www.AddingtonFurniture.com





26 comments so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

2118 posts in 2437 days


#1 posted 03-20-2015 01:13 AM

Very nice build. Thanks for all the great photos showing your process.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

1154 posts in 1099 days


#2 posted 03-20-2015 01:16 AM

Nice job, it’s a clean look.

That fret saw in hard maple must have taken a long time… my vote would have been for the chisel being lazy.

Hope you didn’t put oil where the contact cement is going.

-- Jeff NJ

View Matt Vredenburg's profile

Matt Vredenburg

164 posts in 2879 days


#3 posted 03-20-2015 01:23 AM

Very nice job. I love using leather on my vices too! Good addition.

-- Matt, Arizona

View Luke Addington's profile

Luke Addington

72 posts in 633 days


#4 posted 03-20-2015 01:27 AM



Nice job, it s a clean look.

That fret saw in hard maple must have taken a long time… my vote would have been for the chisel being lazy.

Hope you didn t put oil where the contact cement is going.

- woodchuckerNJ

Nope I made sure to tape off the area for the contact cement & suede. The fret saw was quite fast, I used a coarse pegas blade – for me I think the chisel would have taken longer!

-- Luke, http://www.AddingtonFurniture.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2554 days


#5 posted 03-20-2015 01:36 AM

A beauty.
And can’t get my eyes of that bile in the back…
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Greg In Maryland's profile

Greg In Maryland

550 posts in 2463 days


#6 posted 03-20-2015 02:48 AM

Nice tutorial and vise.

I think that Mads was referring to your bike in the background. Maybe you should take some pictures of just the bike so Mads and I can live vicariously through you.

Greg

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2673 posts in 2649 days


#7 posted 03-20-2015 03:17 AM

Nice details on the lambs tongue. I need to build one of these someday for joinery without back pain.

-- Allen, Colorado

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#8 posted 03-20-2015 04:10 AM

Nice work and details Luke.
I can see why you like it so much.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View pjr1's profile

pjr1

26 posts in 680 days


#9 posted 03-20-2015 04:55 AM

Beautifully done, both the vise and the write up. Thanks for posting this!

View Luke Addington's profile

Luke Addington

72 posts in 633 days


#10 posted 03-20-2015 05:17 AM



Nice tutorial and vise.

I think that Mads was referring to your bike in the background. Maybe you should take some pictures of just the bike so Mads and I can live vicariously through you.

Greg

- Greg In Maryland

Hah! I can do you one better, here’s a quick video of the bike running https://instagram.com/p/ms151El3Po/

-- Luke, http://www.AddingtonFurniture.com

View Luke Addington's profile

Luke Addington

72 posts in 633 days


#11 posted 03-20-2015 05:25 AM

Thank you very much everyone!

Paul – the next time you’re in town I will bring it over so you can give it a try. I think you would like it, you don’t have to lean over so much when you’re using this vise.

-- Luke, http://www.AddingtonFurniture.com

View Jack Houweling's profile

Jack Houweling

89 posts in 668 days


#12 posted 03-20-2015 06:06 AM

What a nice job and I like the step by step instruction.

-- Jack, Delta B.C. http://www.jax-design.net

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2447 posts in 1657 days


#13 posted 03-20-2015 10:13 AM

Awesome work

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

View rtbrmb's profile

rtbrmb

468 posts in 1854 days


#14 posted 03-20-2015 11:38 AM

Beautiful & functional – very nice work.

Where did you get the hardware for the vise?

Thanks for sharing.

Bill in MI

View mafe's profile

mafe

11157 posts in 2554 days


#15 posted 03-20-2015 12:55 PM

Ha yes sorry my miss writing… I was thinking of the bike.
That’s a real easy rider, makes me think of Peter Fonda down the road.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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