LumberJocks

high stool from recycled end grain cutting board

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Project by moshel posted 01-22-2009 02:05 AM 1525 views 2 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

i have made a cutting board with very nice grain wood, but for some reason the gluing did not work well and there were small spaces between the rows. usually I would throw this away, but it was so nice…
so, i made up my mind to make high stool for our shower. as this is a totally inconsequential project, i decided to make the legs at an angle (never attempted this before) and to my surprise it worked very well. as this is really really inconsequential everything worked perfectly. actually my wife wants it now for the living room.

finished with tung oil and several coats of wipe on poly. Wood is rimu and black walnut.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...





5 comments so far

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2602 days


#1 posted 01-22-2009 02:37 AM

It’s the evolution of the end grain cutting board! Looks great now that it’s all put together.

Having your creations upgraded to living room status must mean you are doing something right!

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2371 days


#2 posted 01-22-2009 10:24 AM

yes, now my 5yr wants it for her room. i MUST be doing something right :-)

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2486 days


#3 posted 01-22-2009 12:41 PM

great save and a beautiful stool

-- making sawdust....

View johngoes's profile

johngoes

54 posts in 2130 days


#4 posted 01-22-2009 02:24 PM

What sets it off is the angled legs. The straight pattern of the end grain top makes you want to see straight legs and when they aren’t it becomes a whimsical piece of art. Makes me think of the dancing furniture in one of the disney animated movies. I could see why a kid would love it too.

Are the aprons attached with mortise and tenons? If so, how did you manage the angles? (If not, how did you manage the angles?)

-- Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2371 days


#5 posted 01-22-2009 03:30 PM

it does trick the eye… i had to check that its 90 degrees 10 times (and show my wife with two combination squares).

i used biscuits for the joinery, but mortise and tenon would be the same. the angle does not (to my surprise as well) change the joinery. you have to think about it for a while to see this. only the aprons have to be cut at angle.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

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